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My son lives in Wisconsin and plans on buying a car from a private owner here in Michigan. He has to inspect the car before the sale is final. He than plans on driving the car back to Wisconsin. I know he needs a clear title. What other steps does he need to take?

Thanks for any help.
 

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Make sure the title vin matches the car vin.

I bought a car new from a Ford dealership in 03, they screwed up the vin on the title and it wasnt caught until I traded the car back in to them. 6 months to clear the error up. At first they wanted to pin it on me. When I didnt bite, they fixed it, but it was a PITA.
 

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Make sure he prints out a official MBV or DMV bill of sale from the state the car will be titled in and has it filled out by the seller. Learned this one the hard way when I bought my Mustang! Ended up paying tax for the average current selling price for a 1965 Mustang including 2+2's and convertibles!
 

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Go to the Wisconsin DMV website for details and forms; Read instructions; Follow instructions.
 

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Go to the Wisconsin DMV website for details and forms; Read instructions; Follow instructions.
/\This/\

Every state is different. CYA, and make sure you understand what YOUR state requires. Call them if you have too.
 

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In addition to all the above, he needs to find out if he can drive it from Michigan, through Indiana, into Illinois and up to Wisconsin on a Bill of Sale prior to registering it in Wisconsin. Some states will let you do this within a few days from the date on the BoS. So, you need to check that out for all four states. He should be covered insurance wise from his daily driver household policy but I would check with his company. If there are any doubts about any of this, I would arrange to have it shipped or take a trailer to take it home. Also, if it is a classic car, you never know what could go wrong and a trailer or shipping takes that problem away. The last place you want to get stranded is 80/94 in Indiana/Illinois. We call that stretch of road "the jaws of the monster."
 

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Insure it! I live in AZ and bought my Mach 1 in CA. Given the non-running condition of the car, I never considered it needed to be insured prior to towing it back home on a auto dolly. However, halfway home in the middle of the Nevada dessert, I found two lug nuts gone and two in the process of coming off on the DS rear wheel. I have AAA and figured they could help, but no. AAA has rules that prevent their authorized representatives from assisting under my policy. If the car is not licensed, that is a day pass through the states it will be driven, and insured, they will not touch it under your towing policy. So I tell the representative on the phone so you are just going to abandon me out here? Fortunately they were able to contact a local towing yard that would help.

Turns out, if any of the vehicles wheels are on the ground, it is being driven powered or not.

So get a temporary pass from the states he will be driving in and insure the car before leaving. Usually just a call, or message, to your insurance company will be enough. In AZ, you can get the temporary passes for 3 days cheap online. I would expect other states to have online services too.
 

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My best advice is to ship it home, or rent a U-Haul and a trailer. What he wants to do is a logistical monkeyfook.
 

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My son just went through this, and it turned out the bank that held the title (Capital One) does NOT release the title of the vehicle at the point of pay-off. After the loan is retired, they mail the title to the address listed on the bank loan.

So unless the seller has possession of the title, be ready for this.

In our case, we went to the seller's bank and paid off the seller's loan. We had the owner sign a statement in front of a notary public that said she agreed to sell the car in consideration of our paying off the loan. She would give up all rights to the car. That statement included her full name and address, my son's name and address, the description of the car and VIN including mileage.

We took possession of the car right then and there via my buddy's dealer plate and he drove the car home. We had to wait about three weeks for the bank to mail the title to the seller's home address, then wait for her to mail it to CT.

Of course, if the seller has the title, then never mind...

Good luck.

John
 

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My best advice is to ship it home, or rent a U-Haul and a trailer. What he wants to do is a logistical monkeyfook.
Yup. COMPLETELY agree. Lots of reasons to do this. Insurance and legality of driving through a bunch of states are but just two.
Also falls under the rule "you could drive it but just because you can, doesn't mean you should."
 

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Maybe I'm crazy or maybe I trust Mustangs too much.

A couple of years ago I flew up to Grand Rapids, MI and drove a fellow VMFer's newly purchased '66 Convertible 1380 miles back to Central Texas with a Dealer's Temporary License Plate taped in the rear window. A couple of months ago I flew to Ontario, CA and drove my newly purchased '15 EcoBoost Mustang almost the exact same distance back to Central Texas with a Dealer's Temporary License Plate. I didn't even have a screwdriver or a pair of pliers with me on either trip.
 

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I have bought cars and trucks out of state. Have the seller sign the title. Some states require it to be notorized. Get a bill of sale with the dollar amount. Drive it or trailer it home. I usually drive home.
 

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Also, if it is a classic car, you never know what could go wrong and a trailer or shipping takes that problem away. The last place you want to get stranded is 80/94 in Indiana/Illinois. We call that stretch of road "the jaws of the monster."
I call that stretch some other things, none of which are printable.
 

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Could you enlighten this ignorant southerner, as to why this road is so terrible? :surprise:
The main northern interstates going east/west have to converge at the southern tip of Lake Michigan. Six lanes wide, people and semis going 80 mph when traffic is okay (rarely) or just crawling along at 10 mph (often)
 

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Six lanes wide, people and semis going 80 mph when traffic is okay (rarely) or just crawling along at 10 mph (often)

That sounds about like Loop 610 around Houston. 6 lanes in each direction, posted speed limit of 60 mph and you'll get run over by the people driving 80 mph. Then you get to the I-10 and Hwy 59 interchanges and slam on the brakes.
Gawd, I love that place!
 

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The last place you want to get stranded is 80/94 in Indiana/Illinois. We call that stretch of road "the jaws of the monster."
Your either flyin or dyin! Did that stretch for 30 years and off! 90 mph or 1 mph with nothing in between. I believe the busiest corridor / bottleneck in M'erica
 

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Your either flyin or dyin! Did that stretch for 30 years and off! 90 mph or 1 mph with nothing in between. I believe the busiest corridor / bottleneck in M'erica
No, I80 at San Fran is the worst I've seen, but I hear that the Baltimore area is pretty bad, as is LA. The whole Bay Area needs to be blowed up and started over with a real plan this time.
 

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Huntsville/Birmingham/and Montgomery to some degree, have the same problems. Birmingham shut down a major interstate that goes through downtown to demolish several bridges and build new one's. Big mess up there. Glad I live in the sticks. Little traffic and slow going. >:)
 
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