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Discussion Starter #1
We are putting together the drive train a 289 with a C4 for a 1965 coupe. The C4 has the bellhousing already on and it has been recently rebuilt. we are looking to mate it up the the 289 now. I have ordered the bolts to hold the flexplate on (as well as the reinforcing plate). From what I see there is no bolts to hold the torque converter in place. I have also ordered the bolts that attach the bellhousing to the engine.

I am curious if there are any other bolts or fasteners I will need.

We have the speedo cable and gear ( I believe there should be a clip to hold it in place and assume a screw to keep the clip and cable from moving)

We have the transmission mount and the related cross member ready to go.

Are we missing anything that I should order with the bellhousing/engine bolts and flexplate bolts?

Thank you,

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #3
And left out another question. Is the dust shield attached with the same bolts used to attach the bellhousing to the engine?
 

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Yes there is a dust shield. You should have a small round load spreader that attaches the flex plate to the crank. I think that is the reinforcing plate you are talking about. You should also have 4 bolts that attach the torque converter to the flex plate (I think It's 4). I just took my C4 off and I have it on the garage floor. I can send you some pics when I get home if no one chimes in before that.
 

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As far as I remember, the big plate that goes between bellhousing and engine is installed towards the engine side before you install the flexplate. The bolts that attach bellhousing to engine goes through the holes on the plate and secures it; the lower small section of that plate is attached to bellhousing with separate smaller and shorter bolts. Torque converter is attached to flexplate with nuts (before you attach the small plate to bellhousing). Can't remember the bolt size and length for the small plate and nut for torque converter.
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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The torque converter should have four studs welded to it unless it's a "high stall" aftermarket one from TCI or someplace. Some of those take nuts and bolts. You need four Ford-specific converter nuts. Ones from a hardware store won't do.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It appears the torque nuts are 3/8-24X .34" and the inspection plate bolts are 5/16-18X 1/2" which my son found both.

I have ordered ARP bolts for the flex plate and the bellhousing to engine.

Thank you all for your input. It has been most helpful.

Bob
 

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The bolts on most cars that hold most the torque converters to the flex plate have very thin heads so they do not rub on the steel plate that goes between the block and the bell-housing. They bolts are installed after the trans is in place through the lower inspection plate which is missing 90% of the time??? You have to rotate the flywheel to install each bolt, just finger-tight. Then go back and tighten them down evenly a little at a time. They are not very big bolts so if your don't have a good idea of what "tight" on a small bolt is I used a torque wrench or your going to break a bolt or over stretch it.

But before you get that far you want to position one of the flex plate holes facing straight down and also one of the torque converter bolt holes straight down. That way you have a pretty good idea they are going to be close to each other. If your off a little the torque converter can be easily rotated with a little screwdriver through the flex plate hole. After the first bolt is started you need to put a socket on the crankshaft's harmonic balancer bolt and rotate the flex plate to access the other three bolts. At work we hooked up a remote starter switch to the starter solenoid and let it dangle under the engine instead of rotating the engine by hand, you just tap the switch. Saves wear and tear on you shoulders. Most of us still ended up having shoulder surgeries after 30-year's of working overhead. I've had three of them and I think I ripped the left shoulder for the third time. I'm waiting for the MRI but I know that pain well by now. Work smart and save "your" parts for your retirement years. One thing about the remote starter switch. If you have that by-pass ignition wire still hooked up on the starter solenoid when crank the engine with the remote switch it will try and start, even with the key off. Disconnect that wire first or disable the coil. The remote switch also works good if you have a manual trans that's fighting you going in. If one person uses the switch to crank the engine while another pushes and wiggles the trans most of the times it will slip in. That's if things are lined up close but still fighting you. When you pull at least one trans a week on a fleet of 400 vehicles you learn some shortcuts and you eventually make every mistake there is to be made.

Torque converter bolts do occupationally come loose and will rub on the steel plate and make a terrible clacking noise. The noise will change if you put the trans in and out of gear. That's usually a good indication your bolts have backed out. Its a good idea to apply blue Loctite to the bolts.

Some torque converters have studs in them that slip into the flex plate holes then they get lock-nuts on the studs. Its probably a better idea but there is not always room in the design for a thick lock-nut to stick out.

Something to be aware is the torque converter can easily slide out of the trans if the front of the trans is allowed to tilt down. They can be very difficult to get them back into place because they need to line up and drop over three things and its just about impossible to do it with the trans on its side. I always used a 15 gallon empty grease can and placed the trans inside standing on its tailshaft so I was staring straight down at the torque converter. When you drop the torque converter down on there and rotate it you will feel it drop three separate times. If it slides back out too far your screwed and I you will need to stand the trans back up on its tailshaft again to get the torque converter back in. Usually there is a temporary bracket installed by the rebuilder to keep that from happening. Do not remove it until you have the trans just about ready to slide the last couple inches into place.

A lot of the specialty bolts like the flexplate to crankshaft and the converter bolts should be available in Dorman and should be able to be ordered from the local parts store. They might even have them in there little p[erformance section. Why pay for shipping if you don't need to. The Bellhousing to block bolts are nothing special unless you looking for originality. Otherwsie go the local hardware store and get some grade 8 bolts and grade 8 washers. They must be hardened grade 8 washers so your bolts dont sink down into them like they will wih orindary washers. Plus you don't want to run the bolts heads down directly against the aluminum bellbousing. Throw some grade 8 lock washers on there too if you want. Those are blind holes in the block, meaning thy do not go clean through. Its very important to make sure your bolts are not so long that they bottom out against the block but you want the bolts holding by as many threads as possible. Those bolts we ran down with a 1/2 impact with a 3' long extension and a universal impact socket. Saves a lot of wear and tear on your body and it saves time.

Remote Starter switch.

This guy left off the part where you disconnect the "I" ignition terminal on the solenoid or the disable the coil.You can buy expensive remote starter switches aHarbor Freight one for $10.00 or make your own. They are handy for valve adjustments, rotatineng the engine to find top dead center and in stalling transmissions. Better than bending your fan rotating the engine. Especially useful when your by yourself.

 

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This is my blog entry for transmission install, it will contain some pics and tips to help you.

 

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Don't forget the thread sealant on the flywheel/flexplate bolts.....
Bart, you say this to stop oil leaks? I ask cause I looked at the holes on my crank when I installed my flywheel and they were blind. I know you've posted this before and it got me thinking.
 

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There is a small inspection plate which which does have a pair of small bolts that hold it on.
Those inspection plate bolts are typically 1/4".
 
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