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Discussion Starter #1
I got a set of rebuilt C9OE heads and can't really find much info about them on the internet. I got them with a rebuilt 302 block and a bunch of other parts for an amazing deal. It seems most of the info for this part number relates to them being 351 heads...

I think they are the smaller 58cc chamber ones but can someone on here confirm that for me. I am porting them to match the header gaskets and removing the thermactor humps. They will be going on a 1974 302 block that has been fully rebuilt with flat top pistons and a Schneider 262H cam. I think the block has been decked but I haven't measured yet. The pistons come up almost all the way to the top of the bore it that means anything.

I am trying to figure out what the compression ratio will be...

Here are some pics to help. Are these any good? This guy seems to think so...
http://forums.vintage-mustang.com/engine-drivetrain-parts-sale/536338-c9oe-heads-fresh.html
 

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The C9OE heads have a 60.4 cc combustion chamber. I've the exact same heads.

You should get screw in studs if they are not already done on your heads. You don' want the pressed in studs pulling out with a larger cam.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The C9OE heads have a 60.4 cc combustion chamber. I've the exact same heads.

You should get screw in studs if they are not already done on your heads. You don' want the pressed in studs pulling out with a larger cam.
I just found a blurb in the "How To Rebuild Small Block Ford Engines" (page 37) that states they are 58.2cc for 1969 only. Do you think that applies to these heads?...

How to Rebuild Small-Block Ford Engines - Google Books
 

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The 69 302 heads should be 58.2ccs...The 69 351 heads were 60.4.....You will need to measure how far down in the cylinder your pistons are..Then you will need to figure out how many ccs the valve reliefs are assuming you have a stock style flat top piston...There are lots of online calculators that can help you figure it out once you have all the measurements..
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I got around to taking apart the heads. It looks like they've been machined fairly well. Does this bowl look like it's been ported?



Also are these screw in studs? They are 3/8" fine thread. It looks like they have red loctite at the base of them and I found a bit that spilled from one shaft. Is there a way to tell for sure without removing them? Also the exhaust valve seats appear to be hardened and new valve guides have been pressed in and the guide bosses have been milled down. These heads came with a rebuilt block I got from a hot rod project that was not completed. They were completely rebuilt and never used. I didn't get to speak to the previous owner since he passed and his son really didn't know much about them...





 

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Greetings,

No, those are not screw-in studs. The "red loctite" you are seeing is sealer. The studs go into the water jacket, so sealer is a good precaution.

There are a couple of options for screw-in studs. If you wish to keep the rail rocker arms, not recommended, you can get a stud that has no hex, just a stop ring. Mr. Gasket used to supply these but don't know if they still do. the beauty of thsam was you onl had to tap the stud holes, not mill the stud bosses. My favourite is the 289 Hi-Po style stud. To install them you need to machine the pedestals down 0.230" and tap the holes 7/16-14 (UNC.). I would also suggest you intall the FRPP guide plates, and use either early 289 conventional rocker arms, or slightly better, mid '78 and up stamped steel rocker arms using modified sleds, or best of all aluminum roller rockers. Order custom length hardened pushrods to use with the guideplates.

Assuming you already have the heads disassembled and the studs pulled, you can machine your own stud bosses on a drill press using a counterbore cutter and pilot. Bolt your heads together, chamber side to chamber side so that the angle of one cancels out the angle of the other. This makes the stud bosses level with your drill press table. Set the depth stop on the drill press with a 1/4" piece of keystock. 0.250" is close enough to 0.230". Use the slowest speed on your drill press. Cast iron is best cut dry. Once the stud bosses are cut, use the drill press to ensure the holes are threaded straight. If anyone is interested, I can show a series of photos detailing the procedure, or will machine and tap them for you.

Don
 
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