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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so the first rule of cam breakin seems to be: NO UNNECESSARY CRANKING!

I'm a little worried about a couple things.

1) First, if you can't crank the engine the coolant system won't be burped. My solution for this was going to be to have someone watching the coolant in the radiator at first, filling as necessary and then closing the cap.

2) Timing, I figure I will have a second person rotate the distributor by ear.

3) Overheating, I figure I will have two fans on standby in front of the car in case things get a little hot with the car not moving.

4) Starting. I will be using a new carb. I am worried that the car may not start up right away or stay running if the carb is out of whack. Should I use ether to get it to fire right away and then just hope that keeping the throttle at 2000-3000rpms is enough to keep it running decently?

I plan to use Joe Gibbs breakin oil. I plan to prime the oil system. I plan to properly lube the cam and lifters (obviously).

Is it hard to sit there and modulate the throttle for 20 minutes to a half hour? Should I have another person on standby to takeover halfway through?

What else?
 

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what kind of engine is it? flat tappet? roller? for roller camshafts you don't even need to break them in.

As far as the overheating issue goes the engine won't be taking in any coolant until it warms up enough anyways since the thermostat will be closed so no worries there.

As far as the timing goes I would just start the car, set the timing, then begin the break-in process.

maybe have a second person to top off the radiator but just fill it up before you start it off. it will be fine.

as far as regulating the RPM's I would just set the idle as high as you can once you have everything else squared away and just give it a nice blip every 5 minutes or so.
 

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- If you point the vacuum advance straight ahead, toward the radiator, that's a good starting point for timing

- You can put straight water in the cooling system for startup. Open up the drain valve and let the water run out while you have a garden hose in the radiator running slowly. This will keep a constant supply of cool water in the system ensuring it will not overheat. Obviously, this isn't an option if you plan to run distilled water in the cooling system

- Adust your idle screw to open the carb the same amount as it's opened when the choke is closed and the fast idle is engaged. This will keep the RPMs up even after the choke opens

- Fill the carburetor bowl through the overflow hole at the top. Pump the throttle until you see some fuel squirt from the accellerator pump. Then it should be good to go

- Say a few prayers, ensure everything and everyone is clear of the engine and go for it!

- Keep an eye on the oil pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It is a hydraulic flat tappet cam.

Thanks for the ideas. I just don't have experience here.

I don't have an oil pressure gauge right now. Perhaps this is a perfect opportunity to install a real oil pressure and water temp gauge.

The radiator thing is a good idea. I'll be doing this in my garage, perhaps I can run a tube from the drain out into the driveway so my garage won't get wet.
 

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GET AN OIL PRESSURE GAUGE. Make sure you get a decent 50ish psi while you are priming the system with the drill.

Turn your idle screw all the way in = gets the idle rpm into the 1200 range for startup.

Make sure there is gas in the carb, either pour some in or pump the pedal enough times to get the gas all the way to the carb.

Fill the radiator and leave the cap off. You should have the engine pretty well timed and idling by the time the thermostat opens and you can burp and top off the cooling system.

Good luck!
 

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I was also terrified when I first started mine a few months ago. Something that I was told was that if you do find a problem like no oil pressure, a header glowing or some crazy noise you can stop the engine. Then fix the problem and then start it back up and continue the process. I was under the impression that once you start then you have to finish, but I guess that's not entirely true. That was also my first time actually building a motor and breaking it in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Where is a good place to put an electric oil pressure sensor?
 

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on the engine block? the place to put it is on the drivers side right next to the timing cover. that's the standard location.

as far as inside the car most people mount additional gauges under the dash below the radio.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Going with this setup:
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SWW-122264/
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SWW-122255/
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SWW-814143-F/

Is there any reason not to use the port (that will normally be unused on a '65 Mustang) on the rear coolant crossover of my Performer RPM Manifold for the aftermarket gauge? This will allow me to retain the port on the front coolant crossover for my OEM in dash gauge. I would feel weird if I had a gauge in my dash that was not functioning even though it's no longer needed.

Only vacuum port I will be using is for the vacuum modulator on the transmission and distributor vacuum advance. Everything else will be plugged. Or did you mean I shouldn't worry about the vacuum advance yet either?
 

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Pull the heater hose going into the intake, fill the radiator until water comes out the fitting, now the block is full. You can put a small funnel in the hose and fill it also if you want, reconnect the hose. DO NOT use anything other than water for break-in, if you have an intake leak and get a little water in the engine it wont hurt it, but if you get antifreeze in it could wipe out your bearings, an old engine builder buddy of mine says all it takes is a teaspoon to cause damage.

Pour a little gas in the carb, it should fire immediately, if not the timing is probably off. It helps to have a helper to rotate the distributor a bit as you crank til it fires. I would hook a timing light to the #1 plug wire, to check for spark while cranking.

Once it's running, adjust the idle speed on the carb up for cam break-in, don't need to sit in the car and hold the gas pedal. Keep an eye on the temp and oil pressure. Good luck!
 

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This is making me nervous and its not even my car...good luck jdub. I'll sit over here and be thankful I went hydraulic. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
My cam is hydraulic, do you mean roller?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
If I understand that thread correctly, you used a full synthetic 10w30 weight oil with only an additive when wiping your cam lobe? Then you went on to insult this board while praising one where the collective belief somehow is that only roller cams work in spite of a hundred years of successful flat tappet use in millions of engines?

The oil was Mobile-1 10w-30
A) Always Roller
B) Stop asking motor questions on the classic mustang forums, ask them here where people focus on building engines, not finding a concourse correct heater hose. So you can avoid mistake A
I don't know man...
 

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If I understand that thread correctly, you used a full synthetic 10w30 weight oil with only an additive when wiping your cam lobe? Then you went on to insult this board while praising one where the collective belief somehow is that only roller cams work in spite of a hundred years of successful flat tappet use in millions of engines?





I don't know man...

A)No, I did not use synthetic oil. I typed Mobile-1 out of habit, that's what goes is the bimmer, they talk a lot about oil on the E90 forums as well.

B) when you are asking people for help, you say things they want to hear . And if i was taking a swipe at a forum, it would not have been this one, I'm actually not very active on this board

C) Nothing wrong with flat tappets, I went back in with another one. Just make sure you modulate the throttle, that was the only real difference when when I broke the next one in and it had no problems.
 

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Yeah, I meant roller. Stick it in and go. Keep us posted.
 

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I can't tell you how many engines I have built over the years, all Ford, and each Ford family of engines except for any V6.

I had to stop engines 5 minutes into the first startup, and everywhere in between 30 minutes. Recently I have started using Mobil one instead of what I used to use which was non detergent 30wt. {of course ALL of the engines I build now are roller setup either hyd, or solid.

I've NEVER had a problem yet doing things this way for nearly, well over 30 years now.

I was like you on my first build back in the 80's. It was a Boss 302 engine, first one I ever built all by myself. Had to shut it down after about 5 minutes because I had the lower timing gear in backwards......lol.

But after I fixed the problem I got it running, spent some time tuning a bit, then down the road I went. No engine related problems {my radiator had some unknown leaks I found shortly after that little trip}

Point is don't worry about it. I think this last engine a 800hp twin turbo Dart/Ford 363 I ran for 12 minutes before I had to shut it down due to a coolant leak.

Just crank the engine and let it run as long as you can. If you make it to 30 minutes then great, if you have to shut it down to fix something, then don't sweat it.
 
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