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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone again! I've been recently working on my 1967 mustang coupe which i got about a month ago.I finally put it up on jacks to change oil pan gasket and noticed my tires got alot of negative camber. I'm bad with suspension. The car is fully stock. Could it be the struts? What could it be?
 

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Spammer Hammer
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Well your car doesn’t have struts. However, the shocks won’t affect alignment much if any. Condition of Coil springs and the other components do play into the equation. What is the overall condition of all the front suspension? Has the Shelby/Arning drop been done? Do you have the tools to check the alignment? They are relatively inexpensive as well as the process of alignment.
 

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Negative camber means the top of the tires are leaning in toward the center of the car. Either the LCAs are adjusted too far out or the ball joints are shot. Of course you want about 1/2* to 1* of negative camber.
 

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Hello everyone again! I've been recently working on my 1967 mustang coupe which i got about a month ago.I finally put it up on jacks to change oil pan gasket and noticed my tires got alot of negative camber. I'm bad with suspension. The car is fully stock. Could it be the struts? What could it be?
If the vehicle weight is off the wheels, that's just what it does. Also if you measure the toe, it will have excessive toe in. If you measure the camber with the vehicle weight on the tires, it will probably be 0 or slightly positive camber, for a stock suspension.
 
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If the vehicle weight is off the wheels, that's just what it does. Also if you measure the toe, it will have excessive toe in. If you measure the camber with the vehicle weight on the tires, it will probably be 0 or slightly positive camber, for a stock suspension.
^^^ This. When you "unload" the suspension, because the upper control arm is shorter than the lower control arm, it will draw the top of the tire inward. If you have done the "Arning Drop" it won't be as pronounced and you might even see a slight outward movement, initially, if your spring length is short enough to cause the UCA to be past parallel at rest with weight on the suspension.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If the vehicle weight is off the wheels, that's just what it does. Also if you measure the toe, it will have excessive toe in. If you measure the camber with the vehicle weight on the tires, it will probably be 0 or slightly positive camber, for a stock suspension.
^^^ This. When you "unload" the suspension, because the upper control arm is shorter than the lower control arm, it will draw the top of the tire inward. If you have done the "Arning Drop" it won't be as pronounced and you might even see a slight outward movement, initially, if your spring length is short enough to cause the UCA to be past parallel at rest with weight on the suspension.
I'll put it back down and see what camber i got. I'll go ahead grab the tool for measurements.and i'll keep it posted.
 

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I will also wedge a 7” 2x4 between the frame rail and UCA to keep the suspension from dropping when jacking the car up.
 
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