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Picked up a Haynes welding manual while in Sears today. If I read this thoroughly, and practice with some scrap metal, can I learn this well enough to do floorpans and a right inner fender well? I know Midlife is taking classes to learn this, but my schedule isn't that flexible. Anyone else done it this way?

James

1965 convertible "White Pony", my own lesson in mechanical humility
1968 coupe "Jedstang" for the soon to be 16 y/o boy
 
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I did it. Using a MIG welder is not difficult and just takes a little practice. Don't use flux-core wire as I understand it is much tougher. A friend of mine tried his floorboards using flux-core and had no luck. He brought it to me and I had the floorboards re-installed in less than half a day. He was very pleased. I used gas shielded MIG. It was really easy.

Remember one of the keys to good welding is THOUROUGH cleaning of the metals to be welded, ie, no rust, grease, undercoating, paint, etc.

hrdtail
 
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You should be able to teach yourself to weld just fine. I taught myself to weld with an Arc welder first, then moved on to a Mig welder. Arc welding is a bit of an art. Mig welding is super easy, and if you buy a high quality welder (I have a Lincoln SP125 plus) you will be able to do a beautiful job on the floor pans. But, if you love your car, practice, practice, and practice. Then cut your practice welds in half to be sure you are getting adequate penetration. Not using enough heat is a classic beginner mistake (then again, so is burning though....) I just finished putting floors in my '68 and it came out great! (better than the last time I tried to put in floors....Hehehe). To figure out if you have the touch, try renting a welder for a day and see if you enjoy it. Most construction equimpment rental type places will rent you a MIG welder. Best of luck!

Red '67 Coupe / 289 bored-stroked to 306 / toploader 4spd / 8" Currie Ent. 3.80:1 rear / lowered front A arms / 620 lb springs / etc..
Used for drive-in nights and open track days!
 
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I learned stick welding in high school. Like the other posts say, it takes PRACTICE. It's really not hard, but practice a lot on scrap before you start. Sheet metal is very thin, and it is an art not to burn through. I took one of those 19.99 file cabinets from Walmart and practiced on it. It is super thin.

http://members.tripod.com/tangdar/
'67 Coupe project car (Did I say project car? I meant pile of rust)
http://www.americainter.net/~fevans/tangdar_flintstone.jpg
 

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I taught myself to weld from the Lincoln Electric "Procedure Handbook of Arc Welding"....

That was over 20 years ago...it's now like breathing...*G*

You can find it at many welding supply houses and at Amazon.com

Have fun!

Pat
http://www.jps.net/binay/webdocs/strtmstng002_sml.JPG
 

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Hey Pat... you wanna "breathe" on my newly aquired shelby?!?!!?!

You're just jealous because the voices only talk to me!!!
66 200 3-spd Coupe - emberglo, daily driver
65 289 4-spd Conv - Rangoon Red (what else)
66 Shelby - Red and Ready to be Restored
 
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You can learn to weld yourself. I agree with the others, it just takes a lot of practice, especially on light weight stuff. A mig welder is great if you have one. I use a flux core wire feed, but I agree it is easier with the mig. If you end up using a flux core wire feed, practice a lot on thin metal and use the smallest diameter wire you can get. It is very easy to burn through with the flux core wire feed welder when working with sheet metal.

Jeff Crumpley
Austin, Texas
68 302 j-code coupe
99 5.0 Eddie Bauer Explorer
 
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Sure you can. You can use the forum to help you along when you have questions. I learned on my own too. If you go to the old forum and search for WELD or other key words you'll find a lot of info on the subject. You'll even find a lot of info on this new forum.
The most difficult part of sheet metal work is not the welding IMO, it's getting the repro stuff to fit. The url I attached is one of those examples which tested my skills to the limit.

Adrien.

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1594363&a=12146434&p=46251863

65 GT Coupe, dismantled waiting for resto.
67 Restomod Coupe, in assy.
69 Mach 1 S code, SWMBO say don't take it apart!
91 5.0 LX HB, driver.
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1594363&a=12146434&p=44060413
 

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Adrien, I saw the picture of the fender and the repro metal that you were welding in. What a gap. What do you do in a case like that? I would like to know for future reference.

Stan

THE 90/90 RULE OF PROJECT SCHEDULES...
The first 90% of a project takes 90% of the time. The last 10% of the project takes the other 90%.
 
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It should be real easy to do so! i though i would never know how in class cuz the teacher just said do this and we taught ourselves and our projects turn out just fine!
 

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I'd suggest that you have someone who does welding regularly watch over your shoulder at times and inspect your weld. I'm basically teaching myself, discovering little tricks, and talk to the instructor about them. He says "Yeah...I guess I'm not describing them well enough in class." It helps to have an experienced hand to ask questions/advice while you learn.

For example, yesterday, I was butt welding at least 1/4" to 3/8" gaps on sheet metal, and discovered how to do it. The instructor comes over, I explain the problem of wide gaps, and he explains how to do it, and then shows me. I was basically doing what he showed me, but he did add a little twist to my technique, and I improved quite a bit.

I'd have hate to learn strictly from a book without that kind of feedback. I'm sure it can be done, but I like to ask questions (has anyone noticed that???)

http://clubs.hemmings.com/baymustang/platesmall.jpgLet me check your shorts! My multimeter is just a-waiting! Formerly known as Midlife in the old VMF.
King of the Old Farts *struts*
 
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Stan, I'm not sure what gap your referring to. The replacement parts were from American Designs. From all the sheet metal parts I've purchased, they make the best fitting. This job was tricky. When you think about all the body lines you need to align and get good enough so that they look straight, you'll begin to realize what I mean. Doing this patch was a real challenge. The photo you see is the finished work. I did pretty good considering. I had a problem with warping right in the middle of the joint which will need some bondo.

If your referring to the gap in the area where the bolt attaches to the rocker, that's normal.

Adrien.

65 GT Coupe, dismantled waiting for resto.
67 Restomod Coupe, in assy.
69 Mach 1 S code, SWMBO say don't take it apart!
91 5.0 LX HB, driver.
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1594363&a=12146434&p=44060413
 

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Adrien, yes I was refering to the gap of the two pieces where the fender bolts to the rocker. I am two years removed from the last mustang fender I touched so I really don't know how it should look. Thanks.


THE 90/90 RULE OF PROJECT SCHEDULES...
The first 90% of a project takes 90% of the time. The last 10% of the project takes the other 90%.
 
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