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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the middle of replacing a timing chain (which for me is a two-weekend process, owing to while-I'm-at-it-itis and a general lack of free time) and was about to order a timing chain cover gasket. It seemed the natural thing to do, but then I remembered that a lot of you use just RTV to seal various things.

The question is: can I use RTV in place of a gasket here, or is this something I had better use a real gasket for? If I can get away with just RTV, what flavor of RTV should be used?

(Yes, I have a new front main seal for the timing cover...)

Thanks!
 

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I was able to go to Advanced Auto here and get the entire kit for the timing cover... including the older "insert" type crank gasket thing for it... cost me about... $10.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
cost me about... $10.

I wasn't so much trying to economize -- it's just that whenever I touch a gasket, a leak always seems to follow /forums/images/icons/wink.gif. That's not entirely true, but it's not that far off.

Plus, you've probably never been to the auto parts stores around me. Extremely bad, even compared to what you would usually expect to find at Kragen or Pep Boys. I checked already, and it's Summit or nothing.
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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I'm not that fond of RTV for any kind of oil sealing other than intakes. I would definitely use a gasket. I like to use Permatex aviation-grade sealer (comes in a white can). I've owned the same old Harley since 1987 and this has proven to be the best stuff for it(along with quality gaskets). In case you don't know, old bikes vibrate a lot and are bound and determined to leak any way they can. If this stuff can keep my old bike leak-free, it's likely overkill for our cars.
You know the only way you will find out whether or not your seal is good is to put it ALL back together and drive it. You might prefer a proven gasket sealing technique. It will suck to discover you have to take it all back apart to redo one gasket. I just don't think just RTV will give the results you want.
 

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I have an idea for you, It worked for me, your need an "anerobic" sealant ie: one that cures in the absence of air.

When I rebuilt my first Tremec 3550 transmission I found the case halves had no gasket but were sealed with a 3M gasket maker, anerobic sealant. I used it and the stuff is cool, it seals where there is no air between the adjacent parts but doesn't harden up on the surface. I've had no leaks with this stuff. it comes in a white tube with red lettering and is sold on the rack in most auto parts stores. It is used on many brand new Ford "Mod" motors from the factory.

It should work just fine on your timing cover.
 
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