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1968 coupe, 1968 vert, 1966 coupe
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Just curious as to what you mean? You don’t mean the floor pan correct you meant like the seat risers?
 

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For panels I would not have an issue with the adhesives, they are pretty darn strong. Having said that, I'm not sure I would be happy with them on a more structural part like the seat riser. If you fender gives out in an accident, no big deal. If your seat riser gives out in an accident where does your body go?
 

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The only time I've tried that panel adhesive was in my frame rail extension/trunk drop of replacement I got into last winter. I welded everything, but where the trunk drop off hits the pinch seam on the rear quarter panel, I attempted to use panel adhesive so I wouldn't jack up the paint on the rear quarter wheel arch.

Seemed to work OK. I let it harden for a few days and then went in with a body saw to trim the excess steel off the new (repop) trunk floor along the glued edge with the quarter. As soon as the recip started in to saw the edge, the panel adhesive came apart.

I ended up going back in and welding it and then touched up the paint. The 3M Panel adhesive 08115 was a big fail for my application. Now...maybe expecting it to handle the forces of the body saw was too much to expect....but the parts that were welded sure didn't struggle to handle it.

Phil
 

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The only time I've tried that panel adhesive was in my frame rail extension/trunk drop of replacement I got into last winter. I welded everything, but where the trunk drop off hits the pinch seam on the rear quarter panel, I attempted to use panel adhesive so I wouldn't jack up the paint on the rear quarter wheel arch.

Seemed to work OK. I let it harden for a few days and then went in with a body saw to trim the excess steel off the new (repop) trunk floor along the glued edge with the quarter. As soon as the recip started in to saw the edge, the panel adhesive came apart.

I ended up going back in and welding it and then touched up the paint. The 3M Panel adhesive 08115 was a big fail for my application. Now...maybe expecting it to handle the forces of the body saw was too much to expect....but the parts that were welded sure didn't struggle to handle it.

Phil
You did something wrong. That panel adhesive has more tensile strength than a weld, and crash tests have been performed where bonded panels held up just as well as welded panels.
 
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You did something wrong. That panel adhesive has more tensile strength than a weld, and crash tests have been performed where bonded panels held up just as well as welded panels.
I agree

My friend whos a body man used panel adhesive on the trunk floor to quarter panel connection. Some of that glue oozed out and hardened and I thought I could just break off the excess......lol think again, its still there 20 years later.
 
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be careful using adhesives to bond metal parts together. it does work well, but you must follow the directions to the letter if you want a long term bond. also make sure the bonding surfaces are absolutely clean, and had good tooth for teh adhesive to grab on to.
 

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The Buck stops here! 😁
I would have it welded.

I noticed the “420” in the part number...are you high? 😂

Weld for safety and structural reasons.
Be safe.
 

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I bought some 3M stuff to 'weld' the seams on my F100 project rather than actually welding the length of the box. The glue wasn't cheap- I'm betting you could easily find someone to weld the floor risers for the same or less $. It's an unseen spot, so you don't have to be overly careful with it. So to answer your ?, can you- yes, should you- probably not...
 

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What adhesive would you recommend for bonding fiberglass to aluminum? I have fiberglass bumpers and fabricated aluminum brackets. I don't want to use bumper bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for all the comments. While auto manufacturers are using adhesive more and more in place of welding, even in unibody construction, this use is engineered, tested and conditions are very controlled. They are not trying to bond 54 year old metal to repop parts in my dusty old garage, sooooo, i guess it's not ready for the DIY yet. I bet it will be before long.

A fellow in my local club is a master with a welder. Unfortunately, he doesn't drink so beer currency is out but I'm sure a couple bucks for his trouble will get my car sorted and I'll finally be able to sit up straight in my coupe.
 

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If it's just seat riser it will take all of 10 minutes to weld in.
 

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You are missing out, not taking the time to learn. You can get into it for less than a grand. Think "Stimulus Check" LOL! Anyway, I bet if you purchase your welder from a local welding shop, they'll give you the basics. It's like golf, take your lessons and practice, practice, practice. You will never regret. Years ago (mid 90s) I was given an estimate for rust repair on my current mustang. The number was $15k. Hearing that, I set $2k of my budget aside, bought all of the bodyshop tools I thought I needed, took a few lessons and ended up doing all of my own cutting (Plasma), welding, shoot primer etc. I have since used that old welder hundreds of times for all kinds of odd welding jobs. You tube has so many vids on the subject too.
 

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I agree

My friend whos a body man used panel adhesive on the trunk floor to quarter panel connection. Some of that glue oozed out and hardened and I thought I could just break off the excess......lol think again, its still there 20 years later.
Next time I'll call your friend to come do it.

No...I won't...I'll weld it because I know how to make that work properly.

If the glue is so fussy that a guy who has been working on cars (and everything else under the sun) for 40 years can't successfully use it, taking the proper care at every step....then it isn't a very good solution. Seriously, I read the directions, followed them, clamped the it with about 10 clamps, let it sit much longer than specified, and then waited even longer for it to cure before I attempted to trim it.

I will agree that the glue set up hard and was a huge PIA to get out of the way so I could weld after I gave up on using it for the project. Just because it got hard doesn't mean it bonded. It didn't.

Phil
 
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