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Discussion Starter #1
I'll try not to be too long in describing my situation or potential problem here.

Finally have my new motor installed and it fired up virtually on the very first crank (after fuel reached the carb....). Ran at fast idle for about 10 minutes and all looked fine. This included amp, temp and oil gauges. However, after it warmed up I had trouble keeping it idling, figured it was a timing issue and decided to call it a night.

I came back to the car and could never get it started again. Fiddled with the timing back and forth to no avail. Thought perhaps I had the distributor "off a tooth" and removed the distributor to try and adjust. This took me several more attempts with no success. Many of these times I noticed how tough it was to get the distributor back in synch with the oil pump shaft and this is where I am concerned. After awhile I was getting better at it but I am wondering if I damaged the oil pump during one of those insertions/removals of the distributor.

I then determined my problem was with the carb since I failed to take notice of Pony Carbs warning about NOT using teflon tape on the fuel filter. I did and noticed some slime when I removed the filter. So, I pulled the carb, removed the top cover, floats and jets and went at it with my carb cleaner and air nozzle. Put everything back together and immediately the motor fired up. That's the good news.....

The bad news is the oil pump gauge does not register anything now. I did not run the engine more than 10-15 seconds so to not damage anything here further but I am concerned about the pump. I hate to pull the distributor one more time but if that is what it takes to test the pump, then I have no choice.

Should I pull the distributor, insert a long shaft and spin the pump ccw to test pressure? Does the key need to be on in order to have the gauge register?

Any other suggestions/comments?
 

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Frst I would check the connection at the oil pressure sending unit. If it appears good, then I think you have to test the pump as you described. Also, I would say that the key does need to be on to get a reading on the gauge. Good luck. I know how frustrating things like this can be.
 

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To test the oil pump:
1) Remove the distributor.
2) Get and install a mechanical oil pressure gauge where the sending unit is normally installed.
3) Buy, make or borrow an oil pump shaft spinning tool.MAKE SURE TO DRIVE THE PUMP COUNTERCLOCKWISE.
4) If the pressure gauge reads 50 psi or more, the pump is OK.
 

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Congratulations on the new motor!

I'd be suprised if you can create enough rpm to get 50 psi with a drill motor. I'd pull a valvecover and just check for flow out of the pushrods and over the rockers.

I hate to say this but, I hope you remembered to put a retainer on the oil pump driveshaft and didn't inadvertently drop the shaft in the pan on one of the distributor pulls. (i've done this one before!)

Next time you install the dist, drop it into near position and then bump the starter to turn the dist. and it should align with the oil pump drive and drop into position. Never force it.

If you need to set time, pull the plugs to remove compression and time the car on the starter, then install the plugs and go.
 

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With zero oil pressure after a successful run before, I also suspect a dropped oil pump driveshaft. If you don't install the keeper on the shaft it's easy to do. Almost impossible to extract from the bottom of the pan thru the distributor hole... Better to drop the oil pan instead of wasting your time fishing around. Pull the distributor to confirm the shaft is where it's supposed to be.

If your shaft is still in the oil pump, you've got other problems...

The rule of thumb for oil pressure is 10psi/10mph. So at 60mph you should have 60psi, idle at least 10psi. You'll need to turn 1000RPM CCW, might need an air drill for this.

Good luck neighbor!!
 

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Should I pull the distributor, insert a long shaft and spin the pump ccw to test pressure? Does the key need to be on in order to have the gauge register? Any other suggestions/comments?

IIRC, 5/16" socket (I welded one on the end of a shaft which I insert into my 1/2" reversible drill motor (turning CCW)...good for around 35 psi.....If electrical guage, key needs to be at "on" position....

Peer down distributor hole with flashlight and see if you can spot the top of the oil pump drive hex in the bottom distributor guide hole. If so, proceed with the test; if not, oops!...you found the problem...

Get back to us with the results...
 
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Discussion Starter #7
When I have pulled the distributor in the attempts prior I do indeed see the top hex portion of the drive shaft. Sometimes, it seemed to sit a little higher (sort of flush with the lower, recessed shelf area...) and I would wiggle it around with a long, thin screwdriver to "center" it before I put the distributor back down. It would then "drop" about a 1/4" so I assumed it too fell into its proper recess in the top of the oil pump.

The consensus here is to pull the disti one more time to spin the shaft. Boy, I hate doing that since the motor fires so quickly now. Better to do this than run it with no oil.

Will let you know what happens....
 

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It is entirely possible to pull the shaft out of the pump and have it sitting more or less on top of the pump but not in the pump drive. The distributor will go in and the car will run but the pump isnt turning. Dont ask how I know.
 
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