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Discussion Starter #1
Good afternoon all.

A bit slow day at work, so just wanted to look into the next step.

This weekend, if all goes according to plan...I plan to fire up my mustang that has been sitting for nearly 20 years.

Next step? Should I work on the drum brakes? Should I invest in a drum rebuild kit, I see those going on cjponyparts for almost $300? Though thats almost half of a front disc brake conversion from Chocko.

Per my previous post, this car was pretty much a daily before being trapped in my moms garage for 20 years. The only reason it was stopped being used, is because my father passed away unexpectedly...so no one was able to care/maintain it. The odometer has 493,XXX on it...so it kinda shows that my dad did truly care for it.

Are there any youtube videos or guide that will help me just kinda make sure the drum brakes are in ok and working condition?

All is appreciated! thanks,
 

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This weekend, if all goes according to plan...I plan to fire up my mustang that has been sitting for nearly 20 years.

All is appreciated! thanks,
That may be a tougher task than expected if it's been sitting that long. I would try to get over that hurdle before worrying about what to do next, especially this weekend. It took me about 3 weeks to get one started that had been sitting 15 years...

Allen
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
That may be a tougher task than expected if it's been sitting that long. I would try to get over that hurdle before worrying about what to do next, especially this weekend. It took me about 3 weeks to get one started that had been sitting 15 years...

Allen
Word.

I've been working on that for the past 2- weeks.

I've squirted MMO into the spark plug holes, and eventually got the engine turning by the crankshaft...after about a week.
Changed Coolant and radiator hoses
Changed Oil and filter
Changed Fuel Filter
Bought new spark plugs
Dropped the oil pan and cleaned that out
Bought a new battery

All thats left is to pour in the new oil, prime the oil pump and hook up the battery. But yea...I'm hoping that should be enough. Just kinda wanted to get a overview of what to do with the brakes for this post?
 

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If you're looking to upgrade to disc anyway, then Chock, Dan, is the man. My 66 GT had front disc brakes and I bought Chock's instead of trying to rebuild what I had...

Of course, it's more money, but to spend half of the cost to rebuild the drum brakes only to want disc later? I would splurge. After all, it's the most important part of the car, my opinion...

Allen
 

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If it was stored in a dry space where rust did not form all over everything, you could pull each drum, make sure the contact points on the plate are greased, as well as certain pivot points. Examine all the hoses for checking, and the lines for rust. Then install the drums, adjust the front bearings, and thoroughly bleed the brakes.

If there is any doubt about any line, hose, or cylinder, replace it.
 

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You can buy all the parts on Rockauto.com and and a lot cheaper probably than $300... and you can even pick what brands you want...

I get all of my Brake parts from Rockauto.com for the last 25 years...

:eek:)

Tony K.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You can buy all the parts on Rockauto.com and and a lot cheaper probably than $300... and you can even pick what brands you want...

I get all of my Brake parts from Rockauto.com for the last 25 years...

:eek:)

Tony K.
This was kind of the answer I was looking for...Something to get my drum breaks up to par but not to cost heavy. Thanks I'll look into it!
 

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This was kind of the answer I was looking for...Something to get my drum breaks up to par but not to cost heavy. Thanks I'll look into it!

Don't "buy, before you try". As 22GT stated, unless they were submerged, a thorough cleaning would be my first choice. Obviously, if the shoes are worn, they are cheap and easy to replace.
I'd focus on getting the engine starting and running smoothly.
It depends on your budget?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Don't "buy, before you try". As 22GT stated, unless they were submerged, a thorough cleaning would be my first choice. Obviously, if the shoes are worn, they are cheap and easy to replace.
I'd focus on getting the engine starting and running smoothly.
It depends on your budget?
Roger that. I'll do that, thank you!

Engine...Ugh I ordered the wrong oil pump prime tool. Correct one should be coming in today! So if all goes well...we will see.

Budget wise. Just trying to get it started and then moving/braking on a budget. Then from there assess what needs to be worked on.
 

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If the wheel cylinders aren't visibly leaking; and the MC is functional and the lines aren't leaking it either (bleeding will show this), just drive it.
 

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When I rebuilt the front drums on my 66 years ago I noticed small and big block cars used the same finned drum. Small blocks used a 2.25" wide shoe while big blocks used a 2.50" wide shoes from 67 & up. So I put the big block shoes on. They worked very well! I never had any brake fade that I noticed. When I switched to discs, I really didn't notice much if any improvement. A cheap drum upgrade that is effective.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
When I rebuilt the front drums on my 66 years ago I noticed small and big block cars used the same finned drum. Small blocks used a 2.25" wide shoe while big blocks used a 2.50" wide shoes from 67 & up. So I put the big block shoes on. They worked very well! I never had any brake fade that I noticed. When I switched to discs, I really didn't notice much if any improvement. A cheap drum upgrade that is effective.
I've talked to some people and heard the same as well. They did mention that power brakes were worth it though. Maybe I'll stay with drums all around and go with a power brake conversion instead.
 

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In 36 years I have maintained my rear drums but never found a need to "re-build" them. Other than shoes wearing, cylinders leaking and the adjuster rusting there is not much else to go bad. Granted, my car was from California, so not much rust. New shoes are about $30, new wheel cylinders are about $10/ea and adjusting screws are $5/ea at Rock Auto. Add in $5 for some brake fluid and you should be good to go for well under $100 for the rear brakes. That assumes drums are okay. Remember, use a flare wrench on the lines (well worth the money). A little MightyVac helps with the bleeding.

In order of priority I would go with a dual reservoir master cylinder before power brake booster.
 

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Word.

I've been working on that for the past 2- weeks.

I've squirted MMO into the spark plug holes, and eventually got the engine turning by the crankshaft...after about a week.
Changed Coolant and radiator hoses
Changed Oil and filter
Changed Fuel Filter
Bought new spark plugs
Dropped the oil pan and cleaned that out
Bought a new battery

All thats left is to pour in the new oil, prime the oil pump and hook up the battery. But yea...I'm hoping that should be enough. Just kinda wanted to get a overview of what to do with the brakes for this post?
Did you change the fuel lines and fuel tank? Or at a minimum, blow out the fuel lines, drain the tank and drop an endoscope in the tank to see what it looks like?

How about the carb? Did you rebuild that?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Did you change the fuel lines and fuel tank? Or at a minimum, blow out the fuel lines, drain the tank and drop an endoscope in the tank to see what it looks like?

How about the carb? Did you rebuild that?
To get it started up, I'm running an external gas can directly to the pump. I've also changed the fuel filter at the carb. Replacing the fuel tank and lines is at the top of the list so I can drive it.

I haven't rebuilt the carb, but thats on the list of things to do as well.

Right now, I'm just trying to get it started.
 

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Coolant passages are most likely rusted up.

I would have installed a flush fitting in the heater line and flushed with water first. Drain and fill with white vinegar.
 

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To get it started up, I'm running an external gas can directly to the pump. I've also changed the fuel filter at the carb. Replacing the fuel tank and lines is at the top of the list so I can drive it.

I haven't rebuilt the carb, but thats on the list of things to do as well.

Right now, I'm just trying to get it started.
So you didn't get it started this weekend?

I was afraid that was going to be a much more extensive venture...

Allen
 

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Pull the wheels and drums, clean and inspect. If the drums and shoes don't look half bad, disassemble everything, check under the wheel cylinder dust boots for the presence of fluid and hone/rebuild/replace as needed, re-lube the adjusters, cable guides, wear pads and contact points, re-adjust, reassemble and drive.

You could be lucky and find yourself out just the cost of a couple cans of Brakleen, a tube of synthetic brake grease and a Band-Aid or two. Even having to replace 4 wheel cylinder should still keep you under a hundred bucks.
 
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