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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So like many of us I do worry about parking my car in public and someone taking my car. This got me to thinking about battery disconnects, fuel shut off and kill switches. Right now I don't need any thing because the car isn't running but my goal is having a driving car by spring so this is something I'm kicking around the back of my head to work out the best option for me when the time comes.


The battery disconnect and fuel shut off sound like solid choices but often these will require getting out of the car and opening the hood or trunk to turn off the system. Both of those could be move to the inside of the car with a little more work. That got me to thinking about the kill switch and I have a question for you guys that know more than I do about these cars.


From what I understand the Tact in the 60s mustang has to be hooked up to the distributor with a ground or the car won't run. So if I took that wire and put a kill switch on that wire I could keep the car from running pretty easy. Maybe put the switch in the glove box or under the dash then just flip the switch before I get out of the car no one would ever know why it won't crank without spending some time testing system, something most car thief won't do. I know it won't stop someone from just towing the car way but should keep any one just taking the car for a joy ride or taking the car because it is easier to crank it than a newer car.
 

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I have a simple toggle switch wired (in series I think) to the coil. It's mounted under the dash; easy to flip on or off. Can't see it unless you're under the dash.

Like you said, if someone wants it, they're going to take it. A kill switch won't stop a tow truck.

Mine is always (so far) parked in eyesight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a simple toggle switch wired (in series I think) to the coil. It's mounted under the dash; easy to flip on or off. Can't see it unless you're under the dash.

Like you said, if someone wants it, they're going to take it. A kill switch won't stop a tow truck.

Mine is always (so far) parked in eyesight.

That is a good idea.





I plan on keeping mine in the garage when at home and with out parking it where I can see it but there will be times what just won't happen. Thought about putting the switch in the floor like the head light dimmer switch. Maybe more the dimmer to the dash so there is only 1 in the floor.
 

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A 60s Mustang or pretty much anything is easily started with a 3 foot piece of wire from the battery to the hot side of the coil and jumping the solenoid. BUT if you disable the starter AT the starter, you're more apt to slow them down. That still won't stop a tow truck, but those make noise, attract attention, and a GPS would help you and the fuzz locate it. I can't remember the last time my agency took a report for a stolen classic. Those are pretty well looked after around here. I LIKE locating stolen cars before they're put in an enclosed trailer, parted out or burned... especially when I have an a$§ to tow away with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So I'm not in front of my car but pretty sure the start only has 1 wire going to it so I would have to put in switch in that wire which is what 6 or 4 gauge wire?
 

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You can use a racing car power switch and mount it wherever you like with the appropriate gauge cable, yes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You can use a racing car power switch and mount it wherever you like with the appropriate gauge cable, yes.



That could work. I don't want to do a battery disconnect switch because I'm lazy and I don't want to have to reset my radio presets ever time but one of those switches hooked to the starter would work.
 

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Mine is locked in the garage or in my line of sight.

The backup is S&W.
 

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I wired in a hidden fuel pump relay (not under hood). Pull that out and they can crank and crank but no gas will ever get to the engine without it. As others have said it won't stop a tow truck but at least it will slow them down.
 
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Security paranoia

Does everyone drive in bad neighborhoods? This comes up so often and the same suggestions/solutions are always responding. Kinda like a road map to find the "hidden" switches, cut-off, missing wires, etc. A professional is going to get the car in most cases, so the biggest "solution" is to slow them down with something that can't be easily found or defeated. There are some good security systems out there, trackers, etc., but these is 1 really good system that is hard to defeat and can't be gone around, so the only real possibility of theft is towing it. The old Chapman system used a hood lock and also grounded the ignition. The original lock was a bracket on the radiator support and another under the hood, but these were also weaknesses. We re-designed it so the pin locked the hood latch itself, making it impossible to open the hood. Chapman quit making them around 1992 but the Z-Lok came out and is virtually the same thing. They add that old bracket and it gets thrown away. You have to drill a hole in the hood latch support and into the hood latch itself. There are some mods needed- cutting the pin down and beveling it to easily slide into the latch hole, but the end result is an almost fool-proof hood lock and it only leaves towing as the only way to steal it. It does take a little work to fine tune the pin actuation, but it does add some mental security. I've had my 64 in 44 states, Canada & Mexico and over 400,000 miles and it's always been where I parked it. And if you do get a Z-Lok, get the 7' cable, as it winds part the shock tower and along the radiator support. 6' comes up too short. This works for 64-66 & 69-70's. Since the 67-68 latch is on the hood, we couldn't figure a decent way to make it work on them. The 69-70 comes into the latch at a 90* angle from the radiator support into the latch. The 64-66 comes in from the side.
 

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I open the distributor cap and put the rotor in the trunk or in my pocket.
 
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Tact = Tach?!??

:eek:)
 

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Does everyone drive in bad neighborhoods? This comes up so often and the same suggestions/solutions are always responding. Kinda like a road map to find the "hidden" switches, cut-off, missing wires, etc. A professional is going to get the car in most cases, so the biggest "solution" is to slow them down with something that can't be easily found or defeated. There are some good security systems out there, trackers, etc., but these is 1 really good system that is hard to defeat and can't be gone around, so the only real possibility of theft is towing it. The old Chapman system used a hood lock and also grounded the ignition. The original lock was a bracket on the radiator support and another under the hood, but these were also weaknesses. We re-designed it so the pin locked the hood latch itself, making it impossible to open the hood. Chapman quit making them around 1992 but the Z-Lok came out and is virtually the same thing. They add that old bracket and it gets thrown away. You have to drill a hole in the hood latch support and into the hood latch itself. There are some mods needed- cutting the pin down and beveling it to easily slide into the latch hole, but the end result is an almost fool-proof hood lock and it only leaves towing as the only way to steal it. It does take a little work to fine tune the pin actuation, but it does add some mental security. I've had my 64 in 44 states, Canada & Mexico and over 400,000 miles and it's always been where I parked it. And if you do get a Z-Lok, get the 7' cable, as it winds part the shock tower and along the radiator support. 6' comes up too short. This works for 64-66 & 69-70's. Since the 67-68 latch is on the hood, we couldn't figure a decent way to make it work on them. The 69-70 comes into the latch at a 90* angle from the radiator support into the latch. The 64-66 comes in from the side.



I had one of the original style. Must have been '84 or '85. Didn't know there was a new style. Looks a lot better.
 

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I open the distributor cap and put the rotor in the trunk or in my pocket.
If I was a car thief looking to drive away an older Mustang you'd find this in my pockets...

1. V8 Rotor.
2. Coil Wire.
3. 3 feet of wire with alligator clips.
4. Un-insulated dikes.
5. 5/16-18 x 1 cap screw.
 

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Does everyone drive in bad neighborhoods?
No. But bad guys have cars and go everywhere.

If I was a car thief looking to drive away an older Mustang you'd find this in my pockets...

1. V8 Rotor.
2. Coil Wire.
3. 3 feet of wire with alligator clips.
4. Un-insulated dikes.
5. 5/16-18 x 1 cap screw.
Ok, I give. What's the 1" cap screw for?
 

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I open the distributor cap and put the rotor in the trunk or in my pocket.
Exactly what I do if the car is out of my sight. How many times have you forgotten and tried to start the car? I've done it a few times, lol.
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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I put my battery AND solenoid in the trunk and stuffed my Duraspark box up under the left fender. Plus a noise maker alarm (in the trunk with siren up behind the left fender splash shield) to amuse the thief while he tries to figure out why he can't simply jump and hot wire this '67 like all the other old Fords.
 
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