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Just retired. I started my first job on Monday after graduating high school on Friday. I was unemployed two days in the entire period of life.
Slackers always slack, busy bees always stay busy. You can and will get blind-sided by the business cycle. Never know when the old man dies and his drinking son takes over, then this idiot hires all his drinking buddys. Keep your eyes out for the next job. Don't be a suck-***. Don't break this rule: the next job must pay more than the current one or you stay and put up with the crap.
A lot of good advice there. What did you do for employment?
 

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"I've put my job ahead of my personal life more than I should have."

I can actually speak on this one from some heavy experience and the answer is quite simple today...


Once most companies stopped caring about their employees.... Employees stopped caring about their companies....


It used to be years ago that you went to work for a good company for 20 years, took pride in your work, collected a guaranteed pension, then either moved on to another job with the same thing, or just retired.. The company took care of you, so you respected the company, and even took pride in your work.

Not today. Not anymore. Times have heavily changed...and People have too. Attitudes toward work have too since so many companies have screwed their own employees going back the past 20 years either for political reasons or to pinch every penny. Companies have noone else to blame but themselves. Unless you have a Union job, Pensions went the way of the doe-doe bird, and that supposed "401K" becomes a "201K" and is subject to the ups and downs of the volatile stock market..with your 401k going with it.....Not much of a pension...if you can even call it that. Companies don't care about their employees anymore, and that's totally obvious. They just fill seats long enough for someone to do the job and then move on to the next person who is probably next waiting in line for your position. If your yearly pay gets too high because you've been there too long, They expect you to "Take an incentive package to leave", or they'll just lay you off so that they can give someone else your job much cheaper...usually 20K or more per year cheaper than what you were getting paid, and the next person doing your job not only works 20K cheaper, but works without the previous benefits that you were supplied with.

People are not stupid (Well most people anyway), and they learn fast... so company moral goes downhill like a landslide in most of these cases.

A lot of Companies today are stupid too, because most companies still haven't caught on and realized yet that most young "Millennials" workers today are unlike workers of years ago and if they don't get what they want immediately with a job, They drop it like a hot Potato and immediately move onto another one... unlike workers years ago which would normally "stick it out" with a job and work through any issues... Currently, "Millennials" worker retention is less than 5 years for the average worker....unlike 10, 15, and 20 years for workers years ago. Apparently "Millennials" don't like to stay in one place too long either on top of everything else. "Millennials" are just much different employees and have different wants and expectations than workers of years past. That's just the way it is... It's just that simple. Companies can also blame themselves for helping create that "Atmosphere"...

:eek:)

Tony K.
 

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I've been a high school teacher for 17 years and I have an interview for principal of our school coming up soon. Still don't know if I'm ready to be "management" but I've thought about all the things everyone else has talked about on here, especially @Huntingky - don't know if I'm ready to "cross the fence" but I thought I would kick myself in the future if I didn't at least go for an interview.
 

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After various sales positions in consumer banking, I was offered a spot in their management training program. This was about 6 years out of college. I thought it was the right career path for me. I did great in the program and was made an assistant manager before I finished the program and a few months later, was given a large branch to manage (100mm in deposits with 18 employees...a pretty big branch in Aventura, FL just north of Miami). Most people spend 2+ years in a lending and assistant manager job before getting their own office...I had my own branch within 6 months.

I HATED IT!

The customer side of it was fine, although I can't say I loved dealing with the older customer base in that market...but the employees were hard to deal with. Felt like I was constantly on people to just do their job like professionals. I had to break up verbal fights behind the teller line a few times and had one employee that thought she worked for the government and could never get fired...and the higher ups wouldn't let me fire her because of some prior complaints she made about managers in the past or something. They just told me to keep documenting her file and send notes to HR and they'd deal with it at some point.

It got to a point where I hated leaving my house to go to work and would come home feeling beat down. After a less than 6 months of managing that branch, I decided management wasn't for me and started looking for something else and found it quickly, so I quit.

Wound up back in sales positions at other banks (dealing with high net worth clients) and eventually out of banking all together (still in sales positions since then though).

I realized that management wasn't for me and I've turned down promotions a few times over the years. Have told my managers over the last 14 years to not even approach me with a management offer so I wouldn't have to turn them down.

So my suggestion is to really think about the job and if you're not happy, take a step back and get back to doing something where you can be happy. Let's face it though...it's still work, so I'm not saying you do a job with a smile on your face all day long...but nothing is worse than going to a job you hate day after day.
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
Once most companies stopped caring about their employees.... Employees stopped caring about their companies....


It used to be years ago that you went to work for a good company for 20 years, took pride in your work, collected a guaranteed pension, then either moved on to another job with the same thing, or just retired.. The company took care of you, so you respected the company, and even took pride in your work.



Tony K.

We ARE a union company, and their pay is extremely fair, with good benefits. They'd be hard pressed to find a better wage, doing the same job.
I answer directly to the president of the company, and I can tell you he does care about the employees, the best I've ever seen. He's an awesome boss. The company is like a small family owned type of environment in all the best ways.
Part of what irks me the most, is many of them don't seem to appreciate how good they have it.

A wise man once told me "police yourself, and management won't have to".

I appreciate all of the words of wisdom.

Joe
 

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When somebody does a good job or goes "above and beyond" let them know you appreciate it. It doesn't have to be monetary.
One of the things I have to do is review and approve a lot of written documentation. If somebody does a good job, I put a little sticker or star (like a grade school teacher would) on their cover sheet, along with my comments.
You would be surprised how happy a 40 year old can get with simple recognition.
 

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Having been on both sides of the fence, and in my 49 years of working and now retired this is what I've learned.

One part of being a manager is determining what else the employee is good at. Sure you trained them to do job A, but maybe the employee also wants to do or has an aptitude to do parts of job B along with their own job. Encourage that as you will get a better worker, a happier employee, and cross training, which is good for everyone. When I was a Supervisor in the Navy I had a person that was always late for work. The higher ups wanted to write up this person with all sorts of charges, and I asked if I could talk to him to try to determine what the issue was. Long story short this person had a sleeping disorder and he had a very hard time getting up in the morning. I suggested this person work nights, both parties agreed and this person was one of my best technicians after that on shore and at sea. Try to determine why someone is having an issue and both of you work out the solution. It will show that you care about the employee and their success.

As others have said give praise when it is deserved, and also let them know immediately when they have not lived up to expectations. Don't spring all the things they did wrong at the yearly review as it will just make the employee mad and distrustful of you. As a manager this should be done throughout the year and in writing so it gives the employee a chance to do better, and if not a written paper trail to terminate the employee if you said they needed to improve and didn't.

Anyway, I hope this has helped. Good luck.

If someone has a problem doing better on something ask the employee how they think it could be done better. This shows that you want the employee to not only think for themselves but also you as the manager are open to suggestions on process improvement. Win-Win
 

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Joe,

I've been managing people for over 30 years, and I can tell you that they all fall into a bell curve. Some are great, most are good, and one or two need to be encouraged to find other employment.

I firmly believe that you could go to any organization in the world and you'd find the same thing. Sure some organizations to a better job of hiring and some do worse. Some shops (union especially) may make it hard or near impossible to get rid of some of the people that need to go elsewhere...buy by-and-large no one has 100% great employees and (fortunately) no one has 100% bad.

In glancing at the above responses, I would tend to disagree with many that point at something about the present age that makes employees better or worse or companies better or worse. Nostalgia sometimes makes us remember things fondly, but when I think back to how it was supervising in the 1980's vs today....I see more things the same than different. People are people.

Personally I've found that most people like to be appreciated. A kind word of thanks is a pretty effective tool. When people screw up, that needs to be addressed in as diplomatic way as possible, but it needs to be addressed. When people put personal issues above company needs....you just have to try to work with them on it. Work is not most peoples #1 priority. It's a way of putting food on the table and a roof over their head and that's it. Some managers become frustrated when employees want to schedule personal days for personal reasons or vacation at times when it's not most convenient for the job, etc....but that's their life. And, I have always tried to respect that and work around it the best I can as a manager.

I honestly think it is much harder for managers that have been promoted from the ranks. Obviously they are the ones that have put the job first and gone the extra mile for years and that's often the very traits that got them promoted. They tend to want to see those same traits in all their employees, but that's simply not realistic. Also, it is tough to manage people that you used to work hand-in-hand with at the same level. That same manager would have an easier time managing strangers than his old co-workers. That again is just human nature.

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #30
I can honestly say that I have put effort into showing appreciation for a job well done. I have asked some of them to do an emergency rush job, etc. I always make a point to thank them for stepping up and handling it.

Our union is different than the UAW for example. They don't make it "nearly impossible" to terminate someone. It's a trade union, that is akin to a temp service. It's a hiring union, meaning they will attempt to place us when we are out of work.

I didn't work with any of my guys before, I came from a sister company. Our parent company owns several companies, and will promote from one to another.

Again, thank you all for taking time to help. I'll get there, as I refuse to fail at anything. It's just not in my nature.

I used to talk to my dad about things when I felt a little off track, but I lost him 7 months before I got this promotion. It's left me without my "sounding board" and voice of reason. He was amazing at getting me to see things from a different perspective. I miss that man terribly.
 
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