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Discussion Starter #1
I will be purchasing a new interior kit to change my color from blue to black. Can someone tell me the best procedure to rattle can my plastic and metal parts that I wont be replacing?

Can I just clean and scotch pad the surfaces and paint with black paint? Or will I need a primer coat?
Thanks
 

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For plastic and vinyl use the 3 step SEMS products. Clean with cleaner, spray with prep and then the color. Use lots of VERY LIGHT coats with the color so you don't overwhelm the grain pattern. I use about 6 coats. You can use the SEMS color on metal also.
 

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My opinion is to replace the plastic panels with black ones. I would only paint metal.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok, I have painted some of my panels. Some came out great! and some are aweful. I am having a problem with the metal part of the doors and the little metal trim pieces below the inner sail panel. The paint looks like water when it hits the parts. I have sanded/scuffed, used 2 different kinds of primers, 2 different kinds of black paint, and nothing. I have tried to do very light coats and still doesn't work. I dont know what to do. Can someone help?
 

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The textured portion of the doors has probably been "preserved" with a silicone based solution. They should be stripped, 6" square at a time, scrubbed clean with fine Scotchbrite pads, and cleaned with a prep solvent.

NEVER sand these panels, you'll destroy the "grain", ruining the doors and panels. There is no way to fix that.

Once clean, start with a quick light primer coat, then three thin finish coats.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I did the scotchbrite after I knocked off the primer/paint/clear that was oversprayed on them during paint. My fault for not covering. What kind of prep solvent? Is that local auto part store item? Thanks 22GT, I knew you would have an answer
 

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Auto paint supply. Although lacquer thinner would probably do it, and that's easy to get. Try a small area to see if you are getting good results. If so, remove the test paint and do the whole panel.
 

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A matter of high school chemistry. Oil from skin is always prevalent in interior surfaces. Use a water soluble product first, like Dawn type detergent and rinse well and blow dry."clean rags" can also be a culprit. Shop rags from a service should not be used. Maybe one was used to wipe off grease zerks at last shop. In place of them I used white paper toweling. Prior to that I use drug store Iso alcohol, which of course, is also water soluble. And so is oil from skin. A hair dryer, held at arms length and always moved around will aid in paint not blushing-a humidity causing malady!
When first doing Mustangs, set out to do a color change in an interior. Used a surface prep, sanded lightly and proceded. As it was lacquer, used a lacquer light gray primer first and did the dash first. The fisheyes became visible and watched them move!! Washed the whole mess down with lacquer thinner, started over. STILL HAD SOME. Repeated process, wiped surface with the Iso Alcohol and it worked. From then on used the alcohol first and Dawn-always before sanding.
If the surface is not clean of skin oil, or tobacco residue, sanding or scotchbrite will work the oil into the surface. Lacquer thinner and some preps are petroleum based and are not water soluable-hence fisheyes can appear(not saying they will, but can). If product will burn, don't use them for cleaning unless Dawn type detergent is used afterwards.

Door surfaces that are wire wheeled will give a clean, crisp grain. Always wash surface afterward-you don't know they were mfr'd in China! I don't trust scothbrites either unless they are washed and rinsed first! Over kill, maybe, but have done a lot of interiors and have never had a surface problem after following the cleaning procedure. As mentioned above, SEM paints are sold by NPD and others along with Seymour-both good brands. And used SEM self-etch primer which is lacquer based and compatible.
Hope I don't get deleted for mentioning a company! lol!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Iso Alcohol? I am trying that on Monday. I have used lacquer thinner and then tack clothed the door and still has runs(like water). Thanks yelostang, I will try your process. I will try anything at this point. I need my windows in and have to paint first. So, I will update you guys when I get done.
 

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Are you using primer? Sounds, also, like your surface could be too smooth without any "teeth" to grab. I would wet scuff with 320 wet. Lightly sanding surface will not destroy the grain. When using lacquer, a lacquer primer is really necessary as lacquer does not have the best surface adhesion. Sem self-etch light gray #39683-lacquer base.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I used self etching primer but it may not have been lacquer based? I will check that too
 
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