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Discussion Starter #1
Background: my 69 has new rubber lines, new MS, new booster, new calipers, new rotors, and now EBS red pads. It's a disc/drum car

Even after all the new stuff, the brakes have always been lacking on the stopping. I adjusted the push rod by feel which seemed to help, then it went away. The travel in the pedal is long before I get any stopping and I couldn't lock the tires up even if I stood on pedal.

The master cylinder was throughly bled on the bench before install and the brakes have been bled till my leg fell off.

I'm at a loss at what to do. Is the master cylinder bad? The calipers faulty?
 

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Did you adjust the pushrod between the booster and the master cylinder or do you have an adjustable push rod that's mounted to your brake pedal. The one between the master & booster being out of spec can cause this problem.

If not, then it could be that have a bum master and fluid is bypassing around the piston and not getting full pressure to the pads.
 

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Was it originally disc or converted? May need a proportioning valve to divide the effort between front and rear, usually about 70 front / 30 rear on street cars.
 

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You mentioned the travel is very long before stopping. Do you have a hard pedal after the travel? Or is it soft all the way? If it is hard after the travel sounds like a push rod issue to me. The proportioning valve avoids locking the rear tires. If you don't have it or wrong adjusted your rear will lock (which is dangerous!). I understood you don't have locking tires at all, so I don't think this is your issue.

Which MS are you using? Can you post more information?
 

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Two things come to mind. How did you bleed them? Did you bed the pads? If you don't bed the pads they'll glaze and have a difficult time biting. Long pedal can indicate poor booster vacuum or air in the lines. The way to test is ensure you have good pressure in your brake lines. I don't know of a good, cheap way to test it only with diagnostic gear and that's expensive. If you'e got the right pressure the pads may be glazed.

https://ebcbrakes.com/articles/bedding-in/

EDIT: learned something new, here's an inexpensive way to check pressure

https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Wilwood-260-0966-Brake-Caliper-Pressure-Gauge-0-1500-PSI,138768.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIw4uo1pXx4gIVh8pkCh1-iw1FEAAYASAAEgJOQvD_BwE
 

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Gee thanks vegas, ANOTHER tool added to my want list. :)

One neat way to check and see if long pedal travel is an issue with the fronts or rears is to block off the brake line to the rears at the master cylinder and see how the pedal is then. You can take it further by blocking off individual brakes too and even isolation of the master cylinder itself. Companies like Thexton market kits of adapters and plugs just for this. Unfortunately they fit metric stuff, trucks, and etc and so cost like $150 and are way overkill to check out just one car. DIY version is to hit the fittings section of the parts store and with a little creativity you can make your own. Don't crimp rubber hoses for this it tends to damage them internally and add to your problems. Keep in mind that any block offs you make up HAVE to fit perfectly and not leak at all or you are wasting your time.

That said, the most likely suspect I'd be poking at without such tools and right now would be the master cylinder pushrod. You normally don't have to mess with the adjustment of those unless you have a non-standard mismatch of parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Did you adjust the pushrod between the booster and the master cylinder or do you have an adjustable push rod that's mounted to your brake pedal. The one between the master & booster being out of spec can cause this problem.

If not, then it could be that have a bum master and fluid is bypassing around the piston and not getting full pressure to the pads.
yes, the pushrod between the booster and master was what was adjusted




Was it originally disc or converted? May need a proportioning valve to divide the effort between front and rear, usually about 70 front / 30 rear on street cars.
it has always been a disc/drum car.

You mentioned the travel is very long before stopping. Do you have a hard pedal after the travel? Or is it soft all the way? If it is hard after the travel sounds like a push rod issue to me. The proportioning valve avoids locking the rear tires. If you don't have it or wrong adjusted your rear will lock (which is dangerous!). I understood you don't have locking tires at all, so I don't think this is your issue.

Which MS are you using? Can you post more information?

the travel is soft the whole way through its travel till I pretty much bottom out. it has the factory prop valve for the back. as sated above, its always been a disc/drum car. the rears have never locked up, and either have the fronts other than on a dirt road. the master cylinder (both of them) have came from Orileys. I don't have the part number available off the top of my head, but it was the one that was listed for my particular application. I bench bled the MS with a kit that was provided. I made sure I bled it well above what was necessary to avoid being in a spot of air being trapped in the MS. the system itself on the car was bled in usual fashion, starting with the BR, BL, FR, FL.
 

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What has been done to the rear brakes? Rear brakes and pedal travel are directly connected. Have you adjusted them correctly?? How did you adjust them?
Are the rears all new? Installed correctly?
If you used a stock master it will have the 10 pound residual valve in the master for rear brakes. If aftermarket it will not. Residual is necessary on rear drum cars (Usually)
Plumbing--Front port of master is rear brakes-Rear bowl master is front brakes..

If you have good fluid flow to rear brakes when bleeding, Proportioning valve is not factor--If Low, little pressure in bleeding mean restrictions in P valve, or distribution block, a bit of trash so to speak.
Short list here of thing to look at.
 

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Are the rears adjusted up to the drums so they drag?

Which direction to the bleeders on the front calipers point? They should point rearward towards the passenger compartment. If they point vertically, you need to swap them side to side.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What has been done to the rear brakes? Rear brakes and pedal travel are directly connected. Have you adjusted them correctly?? How did you adjust them?
Are the rears all new? Installed correctly?
If you used a stock master it will have the 10 pound residual valve in the master for rear brakes. If aftermarket it will not. Residual is necessary on rear drum cars (Usually)
Plumbing--Front port of master is rear brakes-Rear bowl master is front brakes..

If you have good fluid flow to rear brakes when bleeding, Proportioning valve is not factor--If Low, little pressure in bleeding mean restrictions in P valve, or distribution block, a bit of trash so to speak.
Short list here of thing to look at.

the rear brakes were all rebuilt with new raybestos products. they could probably use some more adjusting now at this point. I adjusted them so they would just barely drag on the drums.

Are the rears adjusted up to the drums so they drag?

Which direction to the bleeders on the front calipers point? They should point rearward towards the passenger compartment. If they point vertically, you need to swap them side to side.

im 90% sure I installed them correctly since I read before that that's the way they needed to be done. when im home in a few days ill check again.
 
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