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Are classic mustangs ( years 65-68 ) good daily drivers? Im a highschool student and i was wodering if they are good cars for normal driving. Ive heard stories about how they constantly break down but mainly from people who despise ford. I figured id ask the people who know more about them.
 

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I drive my 70 every day....

the only downtime I didnt cause was an ignition pickup for the duraspark conversion I put in....

I've had lots of daily drivers that were almost my age; I know quite a bit about cars, and am armed to handle most hiccups
 

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No. They wouldn't make a good daily driver for a high school student.

OK...that's going to get me flamed so maybe I'd better qualify that statement. If you're God's gift to 16 year old mechanics or your Dad/Brother/Mom/Sister is a mechanic and into mustangs and they want to work with you to get a mustang and get it going, then it might be a good car.

But let's be realistic. A 1965 Mustang is 37 going on 38 years old. That's a lot of years, and for most of them a lot of miles. They can be built to be pretty reliable...but when things go wrong you can't just run down to Autozone and buy every single part you need. Most parts are available, but you may have to order them. For instance, I lost a power steering hose a couple of weeks ago on a Friday, and it was Wednesday before UPS brought the new hose. If my '65 was my only car I'd have been sitting.

Then there's the rust issue. Most '65's I see sitting beside the road for sale have quite a lot of it. Some of it is structural. That means the car isn't as safe as it was when new...and let's face it even when new they weren't all that safe. Many were built without seatbelts (at least in back). A lot have 4 wheel drum brakes. None have ABS. None have air bags. All have "spear-o-matic" steering columns and drop in gas tanks.

Need I go on. There are teens on this forum that have vintage stangs and (I assume) do wonderfully with them. I've known 14 year olds that have rebuilt engines by themselves too, but they are the exception, not the norm. So, I guess I'm saying if you are AN EXCEPTIONAL TEEN, then maybe a vintage mustang might be right for you. If you are AN ABOVE AVERAGE TEEN a newer model might be the thing, like say about a '90 V6 model. If you are A BELOW AVERAGE TEEN, maybe you should just buy a camaro (sorry had to say it /forums/images/icons/wink.gif).

But hey...what do I know??? Think hard about it. Talk it over with an adult you trust...preferably someone that knows about cars. Then you decide. Good Luck...and for God's sake...try to keep the shiny side up.

Phil
 
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I drive my 65 every day. They are great daily drivers for those who want to spend a little time keeping them maintained. However, they are not particularly safe cars. There are products available to make them safer. If you choose to purchase a 65-68 Mustang I would start by converting to shoulder harness retractable seatbelts. You can find them available on the web. Also, a Fuelsafe fuel tank to address the exploding gas tank issue. Disc breaks are available in kits but the drums can be made to perform pretty well. I would email Mustang Monthly for a list of the most pressing safety conversions to perform.
Jeff
 
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Thanx for the info guys, keep it coming if you have it. To phil, im not a whiz with cars....not in the slightest but im asking because my dad is. So i wouldnt be doing it "blind" so to speak. Almost thought about getting a camaro too....jk = ) Im not necessarily going to get a mustang ethier...im just gathering my information right now.
 

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A Mustang is a GREAT car to have... and they're terribly cool. I wanted one since I was six, but then when I was six, the last of the original Mustangs were still being sold at the dealerships!

Most of us own them, though, not only because they are terribly cool and a real piece of history, but because we enjoy working on them and restoring them. Some folks here have taken - literally - years and tens of thousands of dollars to restore / restomod their vehicle. For most high school students, that's not something they're interested in.

Are you looking to have a neat car for a couple of years and then sell it when you go to college? If so, I advise against it.

I am glad you have a serious interest in the car, but I would suggest you think about holding off until you have the time and money to treat a classic right. Not trying to discourage you, but please think it through before you try and buy one.

Good luck,

Steve
 

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The real question; what is your dad willing to buy for you. If it is an old car, he may be asking for a commitment from you to participate in maintenence or restoration. A lot of cars have come and gone since the original pony car Mustang was introduced. Some of those cars were better or more expensive cars, but they have fallen by the side of the road. Those fellows that "bad mouth" one type of car over another usually cannot tell a loose headbolt from their own head; they are clueless. We make Mustangs a hobby because of style, they are easy to work on, do not break down when proper preventive maintence is done, repair parts are inexpensive, the attention a well cared for Mustang attracts is amazing, and they are fun to drive.

My son or daughter today would get a Toyota Echo from me as a first car. My four year old grandson is earmarked for my 1967 convertible.
 
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I would be paying for most of the car and its matinence, and i would be helping him on all of the restoration/matinence. I have a car i can drive until its ready though.
 

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hey, if you have 10 grand, then the mustang hobby could be great for you. If you don't... well then its frustrating. Also, time is a BIG part of the equation, unless you buy a stang in VERY good condition, then you just have to be up to snuff on your maintanence and watch out so you know in advance when something is about to give out (like, hoses, etc, so you can have it on hand beforehand)
 

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I have a 64 9/10 conv that has taken me 190,000+ miles in 6 years on the road. It's been to Calif, Mexico, Canada, even posed in front of the River Rouge factory where it was born, and everywhere inbetween. It's about to become the "poster child" for The Great American Pony Drive II. I'm presently travelling the east coast, meeting with mustangers about the Pony Drive. I finished dropping in the motor a week ago Thursday, changed out the trans Sat @ 3 AM, and trailered it to NY on Sat. Once I delivered my mother in NY, unloaded it and cleaned it up, we started driving South. From there, it's now in Charlotte, heading for Atlanta. It will be travelling all over for promotions and to get me around. My daughter drove a 64 1/5 HT for 2 years of HS (paid $600 for it and drove it home!), then her brother drove it for another year (He now is getting his 69 Mach 1 ready for the road.). Our 68 6 cyl conv is the "beater " car that is used whenever something else isn't working. They do need attention, but can be fixed with almost anything nearby. ANY car can be a daily driver if maintained properly, and even new ones will fail if not treated right. If I just wanted a car to drive, I'd buy anything. I WANT to drive a mustang and am willing to put up with the extra work for the privilege. besides- show me 1 car in the student lot that will be worth more at the end of the school year than at the beginning!!!
 

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If you are a careful and not wild driver, then a convertible is very satisfying. People are struck by my vert and seem to protect it as they would a beautiful girl/woman. Most boys/men prefer fastback Mustangs; most girls/women prefer boys/men that have a convertible Mustang. The rule of thumb is that, it is less expensive to purchase a car in excellent condition than it is to restore it into excellent condition.

This research you are doing should be joyful; I hope the results are joyful also.
 

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First of all, if you DO want to buy a 65-68 Mustang... Go for the 68. For one thing the 68 model year incorporates more safety features than the previous Mustangs while retaining the first generation look. The coupes have the best visibility of the 3 types (fastback, convertible, coupe) and are also the cheapest. I am 16 years old with an unfinished 68 Mustang project. I got a good deal on my car, but there are things to look out for when buying one. First is rust. Rust is expensive, difficult, and time consuming to fix. I advise that if you were to decide on a Mustang, buy a decent car with no rust. It may cost you $5,000 to $6,000 to get a car like that but believe me, it'll cost you less in the long run. Fortunately for me my car was relatively rust free. This allows me to spend more money on mechanical aspects of the car (rearend, brakes, engine) than having to worry about rusted out framerails and floors. Second to rust is mechanics. If the car doesn't run well, who knows what type of problems the engine has. If you buy the car in non-running condition, you pretty much don't know the condition of the brakes, tranny, rearend, power steering or air conditioning (if so equipped), or other engine operated components. Third is cosmetics (I placed this third because you can always drive a car that needs a little body work, but you can't drive one that doesn't function correctly or is so rusted out it would collapse under the strain of a speed bump). Body work is time consuming and paint jobs are expensive. New trim and chrome really add up fast. Interiors in old Mustangs are usually tore up or stained, and needing resoration (unless of course you find a great car in the first place). I'm not trying to list these problems to turn you away, I'm simply listing them as future problems to keep you out looking for. Mustangs are great cars to have (and very reliable, from my experiences) but they do lend themselves to needing time and money. Just like most cars made before 1970. As was said before, a vintage Mustang can be made reliable, aren't as safe as a newer car, but are way cooler. Tell me ,how many people stare at a 90's 6 banger Mustang compared to a 68 V-8 Mustang??? But then again, how much safer, effecient, and reliable would that newer Mustang be over a car that has seen more than 3 decades in parking lots, salty roads, and hard driving? It is just a matter of what you have your heart set on. If a vintage Mustang is what you like, and you have the resources (either a large sum of money up front, like $5,000-7,500, for a 65-58 Mustang or the time, tools, money for parts, and expertise to restore one) for one, go for it. Keep safety in mind since it is hard to drive another car after you wreck one if you are seriously injured or dead. Classic cars are great daily drivers in my opinion because they are so easy to work on yet are still reliable. Anyway, I'll stop writing this long a$$ post. Later!!!
 

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Yes and no...

If you are mechanically inclined and "understand" machinery, they can be fine for a daily driver.

They are very straightforward machines - and if you start with a car that is in good basic shape, there's little that cannot be fixed by most do-it-yourself mechanics.

On the other hand, if you buy a tired, 35-year-old car, that is in need of lotsa repairs to begin with, you might find yourself hitchhiking quite often.

If you are expecting the same reliability experience as ownership of a 5 year old Toyota, you will probably be disappointed.
 

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I bought my first mustang when I was 16. It was (is, as I still own it) a 66 coupe 6cyl. Yes, At first it had it's problems, once corrected, I put 350,000 miles on it until the engine died my senior year in COLLEGE! If you can do the repairs yourself and are willing to do preventative maintenance, then go for it!
 

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There are no good daily drivers for teenagers. Get a bicycle, that's what I'm trying to convince my kids to do. /forums/images/icons/laugh.gif
For my money, I would look towards a late 80s mustang. Newer technology, reasonably cool, easier to get parts, and when you're ready for something else, you can pull the drivetrain and slip it into a Factory Five Rodster, which looks a lot like the roadster that Shelby put together in the 60's.
 

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My 17yr old son has been using our '68 coupe as a daily driver for about 6 months now. It's a bit safer than a 65-66, as others have noted, and we've added shoulder belts. Overall, it has required more time and money than we anticipated, but it's been fun, educational, and a great project to work on together. Once you get it to a certain point, it can be a very reliable, easy to maintain daily driver. The one frustrating thing for my son has been the times when it couldn't be driven until a repair or improvement was completed. But if you can use another vehicle during those "down" times, you won't regret having a stang for your daily driver; the positives will outweigh the negatives. But get shoulder belts, front discs, headrests/highbacks, and maybe a steel rear seat/trunk divider and/or a fuel cell. ENJOY!
 
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