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Hey guys i just finished clearcoating my car and it looks great. I'll post pictures soon. The only issue i have is orange peel in the clear coat. Do you guys have any suggestions for me about eliminating it. I know i need a buffer and i am going to buy one. So what grits do i need and what compounds have you guys used. Thanks in advance for the help.:smile2:
 

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Wet sand with wet/dry sandpaper first, just a buffer will just make the orange peel shiney. It needs to be flattened, I always start with 600 and end with 1200, go easy not much pressure let the paper do the work. I follow with a buffer with 3m Finesse it 2 and then machine glaze. Again, letting the buffer do the work, don't need much pressure. I would talk to your paint shop and see what they recommend. That's my recipe anyway.

(Don't sand the edges, you'll cut through).
 

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Wet sand with wet/dry sandpaper first, just a buffer will just make the orange peel shiney. It needs to be flattened, I always start with 600 and end with 1200, go easy not much pressure let the paper do the work. I follow with a buffer with 3m Finesse it 2 and then machine glaze. Again, letting the buffer do the work, don't need much pressure. I would talk to your paint shop and see what they recommend. That's my recipe anyway.

(Don't sand the edges, you'll cut through).
Good stuff thanks for the post. Its very much appreciated. What you're saying seems inline with what i'm seeing people recommend on other forums. Keep the tips coming guys. Specific compounds and such are really helpful to me.
 

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depending on how bad the peel is, you don't have to start with the 600, if it's minor you can start with 1000 or even 1200 and go from there, it will seem to take longer to get it flat but when you start with 600, you still have to go over it again with finer and finer until you get to 1500 or even 2000, then buff it out. I find it's quicker and safer to start with a finer grit and work one panel at a time, that way it seems like you're actually making some progress.

BUT, as noted, everyone has their own formula that works for them, either way, it's a bunch of work but rewarding in the end.
 
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You should buy Surefinish. Once I switched, I never looked back. You should sand with 1000, then 1500. I stop there. Some like to go farther, I see no reason in the finial results. Buy a 7' sander/buffer with speed control. Surefinish gets used at very low speeds which makes it much safer than high speed buffing, especially for the beginner. It leaves no swirl marks, which is worth it just for that. But it also is easy to clean up in cracks, unlike any other material.

Autobody Store: <B>Sure Finish Polish (Quart)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey guys thank you So much for the info. I think i have it under control now . If i don't. I know who to come and ask.
Thanks again Guys.
 
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