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The dash clock in my '68 runs fast. I understand that one way to slow it down is to turn the clock back. I've done this dozens of times; sometimes every day, sometimes once a week. Regardless, the clock still runs way too fast. It gains about a half-hour every day. Beyond replacing the mechanism with a quartz unit, is there something else I can do to slow it down? Any ideas would be appreciated.
 

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I've got the same problem with mine. When I first got the car it didn't work. I put some watch oil on it and now the thing gains time like crazy. If you find a fix let me know.
 

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Sounds like it needs an inline voltage regulator going to the clock. A resistor might work.
 

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Smae thing here, I gain about 6 min a day. I was thinking about taking ti to a clock repair shop that is close to me. If he can not adjust it, then I will do the quartsz thing to it like I did my other one (it runs very accurate).
 

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I asked someone at work what can be done and he said a resistor will not work. He is guessing there is an adjustment some where on the clock. He said the frequency has to be changed to correct the clock. If there is no adjustment then it's just a bad quartz. If I recall he mentioned that you could pull the frequency up or down with a capacitor. Hope this helps.
 

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The original does not have a quartz.
 
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Your clock is fast because you drive too fast. Drive the speed limit and the clock will be right on. (ha)
 

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I have the same problem about 6 minute gain every day. I tried to adjust by turning back also, several times, several days etc. Nothing I have found works.
 

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Do not reset the clock at random intervals. Set it like this: set it once a week. If it runs fast then turn the hands ccw to the correct time. Wait one week. If it still runs fast repeat the ccw setting. If it runs slow, the turn the hands cw to the correct time. Repeat every week at the same time and the clock will eventually zero in on the correct spring tension for the timing wheel. Resetting it at random intervals, or opposite directions results in hosing up the auto correcting mechanism in the clock. Now if this procedure doesn't work the auto adjuster on the timing wheel is likely jammed. Open the clock, set it on the center of its range (it has tick marks on it) and then follow the procedure of resetting the clock at regular intervals. Example: set the clock every Saturday. Never touch it Sunday through Friday.
 

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Now if this procedure doesn't work the auto adjuster on the timing wheel is likely jammed. Open the clock, set it on the center of its range (it has tick marks on it) and then follow the procedure of resetting the clock at regular intervals

Please provide further information on this. If you take the clock out (say out of a '65 rally pac for instance) what are you looking for inside, and please detail how the adjustment is made.

THANKS!

Phil
 

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RTM your buddy at work hasn't a clue about how the original clock works. Its a mechanical, wind up clock. It winds itself automatically whenever the mainspring runs down. It has an internal solenoid to tension the mainspring. Typically you'll hear the clock make a sound like "zick!" about every minute or so; this is the clock winding itself on battery power. The regulator in the clock is a timing wheel and a hairspring. Attached to this hairspring is an adjuster. The adjuster works by changing the hairspring tension. When you rotate the clock set stem, it also engages the adjuster. The further you rotate the stem, the more the adjuster moves. If you run the clock around 24 hours to set it, it hoses up the adjustment. To allow the adjuster to work properly you MUST set the clock forward or backward according to whether it gains or loses time. If it gains time, you turn the hands ccw. If it loses time, you have set the hands cw. If its far off (from running the hands around with the stem) then its going to take some time (several weeks of patience) to zero in on the correct adjustment. Just adjust it the correct direction on the same day each week and if the clock is working correctly it will zero in on keeping fairly good time. If you're too impatient, take it to a watchmaker. He can set the time in short order because they have a watch timing tool that allows the watchmaker to home in on the correct adjustment in just a matter of minutes.
 

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HoosierBuddy - look inside the clock. Look for the timing wheel and hairspring. If the clock is running this is easy to find because its the little wheel runing back/forth, back/forth. On the back side of its axle you'll see a little scale and the end of the scale is attached to the hairspring. There's also a timing pointer. Very carefully rotate the end connected to the hairspring such the pointer reads mid-scale. Now assemble the clock case and set the hands at REGULAR intervals IN THE CORRECT direction until the clock keeps good time. Note - these old mechanical clocks are not quartz clocks and don't have nearly the accuracy of a quartz clock. If they are reset regularly, they keep time fairly well. Always set the clock on the same day of the week at the same time and you'll get the best results. Lastly, it is possible the self adjuster is hosed up and not working. You can check this by doing as above then setting the stem while the clock case is apart. If you watch closely, when you rotate the stem and hands, the adjuster will also move a small amount. If it does, then the self adjuster is working. If it doesn't take the clock to a watchmaker for repair.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'll give it a shot geegee and hope for the best.

Thanks for the insight.
 

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Tachman fixed my clock five years ago. I emailed him today for his advice. He said gaining 5 minutes a day was great compared to a lot that he had seen and suggested I send it to him to do a quartz conversion. Hmmm.

Phil
 

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gee gee when you adjust the clock that's running fast how do you do it. I have read your posts but I am not certain on exactly how its done. Example: lets say after 1 week of running you find that it is 1 hour fast. lets say its reading 1;00 and should be 12:00. do I just go ccw back to 12:00 or go further? I have already taken the back of the clock apart and have manually adjusted the fast low speed and I think its running around 45 seconds fast per day. Could I expect better than that or am I as close as I could expect. Thanks a lot
 

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According to the shop manual, large adjustments require larger time changes; instead of setting it back 1 hour, set it back 13 hours.
This will make the auto correct mechanism move further.
Since these clocks will by nature change timing with temperature and humidity, I include a copy of how to auto-correct the clock timing with every clock I repair.
Be very careful when manually adjusting the mechanism. The hairspring is attached to the adjuster arm and the slightest kink in that spring will make you clock wildly inaccurate and impossible to adjust.
 

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HoosierBuddy - look inside the clock. Look for the timing wheel and hairspring. If the clock is running this is easy to find because its the little wheel runing back/forth, back/forth. On the back side of its axle you'll see a little scale and the end of the scale is attached to the hairspring. There's also a timing pointer. Very carefully rotate the end connected to the hairspring such the pointer reads mid-scale. Now assemble the clock case and set the hands at REGULAR intervals IN THE CORRECT direction until the clock keeps good time. Note - these old mechanical clocks are not quartz clocks and don't have nearly the accuracy of a quartz clock. If they are reset regularly, they keep time fairly well. Always set the clock on the same day of the week at the same time and you'll get the best results. Lastly, it is possible the self adjuster is hosed up and not working. You can check this by doing as above then setting the stem while the clock case is apart. If you watch closely, when you rotate the stem and hands, the adjuster will also move a small amount. If it does, then the self adjuster is working. If it doesn't take the clock to a watchmaker for repair.
He's right, the self adjuster requires you to move, in this case a fast clock, backward to tip the adjuster to a slower setting. However, it is quite possible the adjuster is stuck. This would require manually pushing the adjuster to a slower setting. If you are not absolutely capable of doing this, have it done professionally.

Note: OEM clocks are not affected by voltage. They are electrically-wound mechanical clocks.

I kept the OEM clock in my Rally-Pac running for 20 years by occasionally cleaning it and the winding points. Then one day it was filled with smoke, and I knew the winder was fried. The quartz replacement is accurate enough to verify my wristwatch.
 

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Ok thanks. one more question about moving the adjuster to adjust fast or slow. if you looking at the back of the clock and the 12 is at the top and the adjuster is on the right side. Which way to you move the adjuster to make it faster or slower. I was thinking sliding it up towards the 12 position makes it faster and down towards the 6 slower. Is the correct? Thanks
 
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