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Discussion Starter #1
After lying on my back and pulling out my 3spd tranny I have a few questions to be sure I am putting my new clutch in properly.
1: Does the domed or offset part of the clutch disc go in facing the rear of the car toward the tranny and pressure plate?
2: As I tightened down the pressure plate I noticed the 3 fingers pulling in towards the disc quite a bit, is this normal and will it still give more play to release the plate when the clutch pedal is depressed or have I installed something backwards?
I just thought I would rather be sure by asking, than putting something in wrong and having to start all over again :(
I am only concerned as I never really payed attention to which way the old disc came out.
The vehicle is a 65 6cyl coupe.


1965 Mustang coupe
1961 Thunderbird
1983 Monte Carlo Conv.
Yeah, thats right Convertible!!
 
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1. yes
2. yes, the same action that pushes the fingers in to release the clutch works
as you tighten the P.plate to the flywheel. Remember to use the tool to line
the clutch with the crankshaft end bushing/bearing.
jimbo

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It sounds like your disc may be backwards. If it's a new disc,
look on it for a sticker or etching that will say "flywheel side".
The domed part goes toward the tranny or sticking out-I double checked mine in the basement to be sure.


Was Bob Emmerich on old forum
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I did put in the disc correctly then, and I did use the alignment tool. When I got the tranny back into place and the input shaft grooves aligned with the disc splines the tranny went in almost all the way and by cross tightening the 4 bolts I pulled it snug, is this also normal?

1965 Mustang coupe
1961 Thunderbird
1983 Monte Carlo Conv.
Yeah, thats right Convertible!!
 

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Very smart question to ask. I put a clutch disk in backwards once myself. Duhh..

1) The "raised" or "offset" center portion you mentioned faces to the rear (away from the flywheel). You'll notice it needs to so it doesn't hit the bolts holding the flywheel to the crankshaft. When you put the pressure plate on you'll see how nicely it fits into the center of the pressure plate.

2) Yes, the movement in the pressure plate fingers is normal and "good". This is the preload or clamping force being applied by the pressure plate to the clutch disc as you tighten down the pressure plate.

BTW. If you know the orientation of the pressure plate relative to the flywheel put it back in the same position. The P.O. may have balanced the assembly for you.

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Good for you using the alignment tool....back in the old days we had a selection of old input shafts to do that simple but important job...*G*

Almost?? The trans should push up against the bellhousing with hand pressure as long as its weight is supported...the mated parts may be a bit snug but you shouldn't need the bolts to pull the trans up against the bellhousing...

If you now have it tightened, try loosening the bolts a 1/4" or so and see if the trans stays put or starts to back out (with its weight supported)...if it does back out, something is binding and you'll need to figure that out before proceeding...

The manual trans gurus here know a lot more than me about this stuff but I've wrestled enough BW T19's into trucks to know when the trans fits right it just slides into place...

Good luck!

Pat
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I have 3 times installed clutch between 289 and T-10 without any alignment help, except own fingers. You need an extra pair of hands, but without any car lift or tranny hoist, you need them anyway. We put clutch and pressure plate and I am feeling the clutch centering with the help of pressure plate. Then the helper will tighten the pp. bolts while I am still feeling centeredness (is it a word, well, now it is) of the clutch. Of course it would be easier with tools, but we have managed to get tranny in place always without even thinking of torqueing it flush with bolts. First time it was very easy, last time we were bit arrogant and didn't "feel" the centeredness long enough, like "heyy, we're pros".

Door handle first when cornering
 

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Pat, I changed a clutch myself a looooong time ago without using any alignment tools: just put the clutch disk and pressure plate in, throwout bearing, and stuffed the tranny in. Can you throw up a pic of the tool? My guess is that is looks like an input shaft...

http://clubs.hemmings.com/baymustang/platesmall.jpgLet me check your shorts! My multimeter is just a-waiting! Formerly known as Midlife in the old VMF.
King of the Old Farts *struts*
 

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If you have a copy of our last catalog, look on page 96. It a plastic version of the end of the input shaft. They make the installation soooo much easier!

Scott
National Parts Depot
1965 Conv:Street driven concours
1966 Coupe: Daily driver and toy
 

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Yeah Scott, thank those petrochemical companies for modern plastics...

Junk trannys were the main source of our old time alignment tools...that and some creatively carved broomsticks...*G*

Then came injection molded plastic....yippee!!



Pat
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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the replies.
The more I think about it I realize that I likely had the tail of the tranny hanging a lil' low, which is why I couldn't get the tranny flush with the bell housing.
I had threaded a couple of threaded dowels into the bell housing to help guide the tranny in place and probobaly was relying on them to support the weight of the trans.
I did not feel any resistance when I drew down the 4 tranny bolts and I don't see what I could have been hanging up on anyhow. I just get a little paronoid when it comes to my lil' pony.
Thanks again.
Rob

1965 Mustang coupe
1961 Thunderbird
1983 Monte Carlo Conv.
Yeah, thats right...Convertible!!<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by hooverq on 03/21/01 10:34 AM (server time).</FONT></P>
 

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I never went the old tranny route. The shafts just don't fit well in my toolbox! Used the wood dowels for years until I came across the plastic.

Scott
National Parts Depot
1965 Conv:Street driven concours
1966 Coupe: Daily driver and toy
 

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Kewl! I don't have your latest catalog (I've moved and the catalogs didn't follow), but I did find it in an earlier version. Now that is slick! As I said, we just installed the clutch, and jammed the tranny in. I was on a creeper, with the tranny on my chest...oh what a pain that was, trying to get the bolts started and alignment going all at once!

http://clubs.hemmings.com/baymustang/platesmall.jpgLet me check your shorts! My multimeter is just a-waiting! Formerly known as Midlife in the old VMF.
King of the Old Farts *struts*
 
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