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Discussion Starter #1
So I recently had to replace the throwout bearing in my car. I looked at the clutch and pessure plate, and the looked ok, so I put them back in. The clutch disk was about 50%, but there was definitely some wear left in it. My problem is, I can't get the pedal to come back up all the way. If I adjust the linkage to where it will come back up all the way, the clutch slips horribly. I replaced the z bar bushings, and it moves freely now. The pedal support bushings appear ok. It hangs straight and seems to move fairly free. It is not hard to depress at all. From what I understand the assist spring only helps pull the pedal down, not back up. Is this true? Could it be the assist spring? Or is my clutch just worn enough that it won't adjust properly? If I had the money, I would just throw a new centerforce clutch in and be done with it!
 

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I had that problem after my car sat for a while. I was in the process of changing my dash lights out to led bulbs, so while the dash was out I sprayed the return spring with plenty of WD 40. After driving it for about a week the pedal started to travel all the way back up. If you do this make sure you cover the floor with some old towels to catch the over spray.
 

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do not adjust the clutch so the pedal comes ALL the way up - there should be a touch of free play on the pedal at the top. Just a touch. If its adjusted all the way you may be preloading the pedal which means there is never full spring pressure on the fiber disc.
 

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The pedal should come all the way up. What you want is about 1 1/2 to 2 inches of free play at the top. You should be able to depress the pedal that much before you feel the pressure of the throwout bearing depressing the clutch fingers.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I will lube the assist spring and the pedal support area the best I can and see if it helps. Vipex, I did do this at first, but I soon realized it was wrong as soon as I left the driveway. I have it adjusted to where it has to be depressed around 2- 2.5 inches before it comes up against the pressure plate. I know that is too much, but it was still slipping at anything less. I think maybe i got a little bit of grease on the clutch when I put it in. that could be part of my slipping problem. I will drive it some more and try to adjust it again. So how much clearance should there be between the end of the clutch pushrod and the clutch fork when the throwout bearing is against the pres plate fingers?
 

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If all the pivots and bushings are good, then the linkage is adjusted by setting 1/8" gap between the lower pushrod and the release lever. This allows the pedal spring to travel "over center" and pull the pedal the rest of the way up.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok! I thought I remembered one of you guys saying that before, but I couldn't remember for sure. I think I have more than 1/8 in there. I kept putting more slack in it to keep it from slipping. But I think I might have got some oil on it while it was out, so that was probably the real problem, cuz it isn't slipping now. I will readjust it tomorrow and see what happens. Thanks! :)
 

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The pedal should come all the way up. What you want is about 1 1/2 to 2 inches of free play at the top. You should be able to depress the pedal that much before you feel the pressure of the throwout bearing depressing the clutch fingers.
I think we were both trying to communicate the same thing...but in any event it worked out for him.
 
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Check the pedal support bushings. If they are chewed up the pedal will never adjust properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So I readjusted the clutch to where there was around an 1/8 of clearance between the pushrod and the release fork, and it works great! I put some WD40 on all of the linkage under the dash and that helped alot. (Thanks t. Klapperich for that tip!) I had more clearance in there than I thought I did, because I had kept backing it off when the clutch was slipping so bad. I think I must have got some grease on it when I put it in or something, cuz it is not slipping now at all. Thanks for all the help! Oh, and btw, I adjusted the clutch on my 77 F150 460 4 spd the same way, and it works great now too! LOL the clutch in that has been doing the same thing for the past 2 years, and I never knew exactly how to do it!
 

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Good to hear you got it taken care of. If you get stuck on something or have a problem, just ask, someone on here will usually be able to point you in the right direction !!
 

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here is the clutch linkage diagram out of the shop manual for a '66.
there are many parts that can wear out!
it is all a matter of mechanical linkage to
disengage the clutch when the pedal is depressed.
all the little parts; plastic bearings, felt washers
can be had for cheap
and will do wonders for ease of clutch function.
we just did all this on my son's '66.
we had to deal with a 'cobbled' up linkage
to accomadate aftermarket headers.
for instance, the Z-bar pivot on the engine side
was moved about 1.5" rearward!!
it was a wonder that the linkage worked at all!
now it is back to stock and works very well.
we ended up using a single spring
attached to the clutch release lever
running forward to a spot near the front suspension.
one wants enough spring force to
retain the rod thats pushes on the clutch release lever
and to return the z-bar and clutch pedal
to their inital positions
we set it up to have about 1/2" free play
(ie. the distance the pedal is depressed before
the throw out bearing begins to depress the
clutch pressure plate fingers)
we did this so the clutch won't slip
and so the pedal needs less depression
to disengage the clutch for shifting.
it is possible to have less for rapid shifting
but one runs the risk of excessive clutch wear.
iowa

 
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