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One last time before the gun does the job. I have a '66 Wimbleton White car. It is all epoxy primed and all the rust stuff has been repaired. It is ready for the paint booth. Previously, most have said go with the clear coat but my gut is not really comfortable with that answer. If I go with single process Concept, I feel that it will be easier to touch up small stuff and that I can do it myself with a touch-up gun and 1000 grit and a polishing wheel. Is that true? Why does the body shop seem to prefer the clear coat process. They do absolutely beautiful work on Rolls, Mercedes, etc. Your opinion please. It is really appreciated. I just don't want to screw up after all this prep work.

65 Conv., 65 & 66 Coupes and the remains of
a 66' Coupe with 6 cyl. engine and V-8 3 spd.
 
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i just painted a car with concept about a month ago. the only thing I don't like about it is you never know how far you have gone with the watersanding and buffing. at least with a clearcoat you know when you hit color.

i think concept makes for a nicer, factory looking job

also, concept should only be used for solid colors if you plan on buffing.

Charles Turner
MCA Gold Card Judge(64.5-65, 66)
'65 Fastback
'00 GT Conv, triple black


Check out my 65 [color:blue]fastback!</font color=blue>
 

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Clear coats were not used by the factory when the cars were new. Modern catalytic enamels and urethanes will outlast the original baked enamel. If you can find a painter that has a CLEAN booth and can lay the single stage of white with minimum orange peel, that will not need to be color sanded, the resulting shine will equal that of a new car. Have you noticed how the factory paint on door jambs still have that factory shine after 25-30 years? The surface has not been "scratched" trying to buff out a shine.

If a clear coat paint is scratched, such that the base coat must be painted, to touch up the damage, a complete panel if not the entire car will have to be repainted.

Perhaps the shops like the clear coats because it requires less expensive color coats??

Good Luck.
Mark Mosteller

"Everything that is really great and inspiring is created by the individual who can labor in freedom." Albert Einstein

65 Fastback GT. 65 Convertible. 84GT, 90 5.0 LX Convertible. MCA. Southern, CA
 

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First neither would be my choice but I like the single stage better.

A small rant - I hate the idea that painters have become craftsmen that instead of taking every effort to produce a flawless finished product just want to apply then sand and buff. The base coat claer coat just seems to be a continuation of this sort of thing. I've been lucky enough to get some decent jobs in the past but when I've had the option I do not return the car when its done to get a final sand and buff. These cars look great over the long run compared to the sand and buff cars I've had even when we have used the same product. Got a couple (yes they do not see the sun much) that have never been waxed.

Sorry just one of those things that bother me

Jeff Speegle
MCA Shelby Gold Card

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Mustang & Shelby research, documentation

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I don't think clear coat will do anything for you that will make it worth the effort. Personally, I rarely paint any non-metalic color using clear. My daily driver is red, and I painted it without clear a few years ago. You are right, it makes touch up a breeze. I can fix a little rust spot on the rear quarter without worrying about having to clear everything in sight to finish the job. I'd pass on the clear.

Jim Vogel
Tallmadge, Ohio

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I see your point, but I think the sanding and buffing process also requires craftsmanship if it is to be done right, in which case it can produce a superior finish.

Jim Vogel
Tallmadge, Ohio

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Mine is going Calypso Coral in Diamont (BASF) base coat, clear coat. The BC-CC when properly done is unmatched for durability, shine, quality and overall appearance. If you are after originality then use single stage paint. I disagree that BC-CC requires less craftsmanship. There is quite an art to laying down a good BC-CC finish and then buffing to a flawless finish. By the way, when was the last time you ever saw something other than a BC-CC paint job win best paint at a car show????

1970 Mach 1, soon to be finished, 351 4V, Calypso Coral, top loader
 

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I paint so I will jump into this one..
To me, one of the main reasons that BC CC works is that I can paint in the garage, with bugs and dust! We do our best to keep the bugs out but one of us stands by with tweezers to pluck out the bugs before they leave tracks. I have seen some real problems go away after a little 1200 grit and some polishing compound.

There is nothing hard about color sanding. I showed my 16 year old (major blond) daughter how to do her fender. She did a perfect job.

Both my cars got major "cheers" at the shows I went to. Most were dumbfounded that my cars were painted in a garage by amatures.

We use Omni PPG. I have painted Ragoon red and silver blue. Both colors were fantastic!

Regards,
Rt
 
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