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What coolant are you guys using with your aluminum radiator? Does anyone add any water wetter or the equivalent too?
 

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Lately I've turned to "Nissan" blue colored P-HOAT coolant. I prefer to mix my own coolant but it only comes premixed. It's the business for cast iron engines with aluminum parts. Up to five year life in a regularly driven car and up to ten years in a storage situation. (Garage queen, car museum). I found out about it in a seminar but more info is out there if you care to look. "Toyota" pink or red coolant is essentially the same thing, if you like those colors better. I'm slowly moving almost all our vehicles over to the blue stuff. Fords, two Dodges, and two Asians.
Except the one German one which will keep getting Euro spec orange OAT stuff.

Some folks who live where it never freezes like to run water with some anti-corrosion additives and/or Water Wetter. I wouldn't, but it seems to work OK.
 

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Man i just installed a aluminum radiator and filled with Peak green, wish i would have seen this sooner.
Will the peak green work OK with the aluminum radiator?
Next coolant flush i will look into the Nissan Blue.
 

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G-05 based on some basic online research and forum feedback. Here is a breakdown of the colors:

743803
 

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I use Evans Waterless coolant in my radiator, a bit pricey, but love that it lowers the PSI from 16 lbs. to 7 lbs. for the radiator cap and hoses, and I've never overheated in Phoenix. It has a 10 year life span, so I have 1 more year to go before I need to change it.
 

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Will the peak green work OK with the aluminum radiator?
In reality about any coolant will work, more or less. But if you are after the optimal chemistry of the latest and greatest for our old cars that may be driven rarely or seasonally driven then P-HOAT is the current best. No silicates to drop out and make crud on the inside of radiators and such. A radiator shop can tell instantly from the inside of a radiator if it used "Asian" coolant or not. The Asian ones tend to be clean as almost new inside even when over twenty years old. Versus the green which will at the minimum leave a white crust of stuff all over everywhere.
My personal fleet is being swapped over slowly. I'm not going to toss perfectly good coolant. I wait until there's an issue that would require dumping the coolant anyway or the coolant ages out (and I start get nervous about putting it off anymore). Rule of thumb is that green stuff is good for about three years. And again, green isn't bad, it's just that we can do better. If we want.
If you choose to upgrade coolants be sure to flush the heck out of everything.
 

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From my research, use the old Green coolant if you have a brazed copper/brass radiator or heater core. It's the best coolant for those materials, but it needs to be replaced MUCH more frequently, suggested 2-3 Years. As Gypsy says, modern formulations are designed for Cast Iron and Aluminum components, with some good long life options. I switched to the Asian/Toyota Red when I ditched the Brass rad. in my '89 P-U for a new Aluminum/Plastic one.

It's crazy, at this point I have 4 types of coolant in my cabinet: Toyota Red, Audi Pink (wife's A5), Porsche Pink(Boxster-probably the same), and Dex-Cool (I know ) for my truck !
 

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I'm using what ever the bulk tank at work has ,yellowish universal
That stuff tends to be a generic version of Dex-Cool.
 

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I'm using the G05 HOAT in mine. Regarding Evans Cooling, I used to use it a lot during my dirt bike racing years on a 4-stroke that was prone to overheating in the slow stuff. Worked great as the boiling point is over 300 degrees. The only thing I didn't like about it was that it didn't boil. In other words, I use a boilover as a symptom of another problem. If you run Evans in your Mustang and something goes wrong with the cooling system and you are not watching the gauge you can hit 350 internal engine temps before you notice a boilover. That could do some damage. Having said all that, I ran Evans for about 7 years of racing motorcycles and it worked well for that application. I would not, however, run it in my Mustang for reason above.
 

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thanks guys with the new aluminum radiator and I recently installed a complete vintage air system, Ill likely swap to P-HOAT Blue next coolant change.
 

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I use Rotella ELC NF in my Diesel truck and my Mustang. Two of the bullet points on the bottle are: Excellent aluminum protection, 600,000 miles or 12,000 hours of service among many more.

 

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Hmm. ELC NF is a version of Dex-Cool with additives big diesel engines require to fight cavitation problems on cylinder liners. If you don't have an engine with cylinder liners then you're paying extra for stuff you don't really need. Dex-Cool can indeed last half a million miles in vehicles that put on that many miles in only a couple of years. For passenger vehicles OAT's last five years at best. Because other the road trucks aren't pony cars and lots of what they do doesn't really compare. Not to say you can't use it if you want and be happy just that I don't consider it to be optimal for use in vehicles it wasn't intended for. Though modern OAT's work and work very well I still don't care for them personally. No one is required to LIKE the things I like though.
 

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I have been using Global Final Charge coolant (red) because is is silicate AND nitrite free, good for seals and water pumps and I've had good success with little to no internal corrosion.
 

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Hmm. ELC NF is a version of Dex-Cool with additives big diesel engines require to fight cavitation problems on cylinder liners. If you don't have an engine with cylinder liners then you're paying extra for stuff you don't really need. Dex-Cool can indeed last half a million miles in vehicles that put on that many miles in only a couple of years. For passenger vehicles OAT's last five years at best. Because other the road trucks aren't pony cars and lots of what they do doesn't really compare. Not to say you can't use it if you want and be happy just that I don't consider it to be optimal for use in vehicles it wasn't intended for. Though modern OAT's work and work very well I still don't care for them personally. No one is required to LIKE the things I like though.
I agree, I'm thinking about flushing out the Dex-Cool from my K2500 this summer. I never knew it was problematic until a few years ago. My heater has become very weak, I'm wondering if the core has started to plug !?
 

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Hmm. ELC NF is a version of Dex-Cool with additives big diesel engines require to fight cavitation problems on cylinder liners. If you don't have an engine with cylinder liners then you're paying extra for stuff you don't really need. Dex-Cool can indeed last half a million miles in vehicles that put on that many miles in only a couple of years. For passenger vehicles OAT's last five years at best. Because other the road trucks aren't pony cars and lots of what they do doesn't really compare. Not to say you can't use it if you want and be happy just that I don't consider it to be optimal for use in vehicles it wasn't intended for. Though modern OAT's work and work very well I still don't care for them personally. No one is required to LIKE the things I like though.
Good points Gypsy, but I pay no more for the Rotella than I do for others. My trucks run it and so do my cars. Easier to keep a single type around than having multiple types. Same for the oil. Since the truck needs 4 gallons every change I just use the same oil in the Mustang. Granted, not optimal but the truck has 360,000 miles with no problems and the Mustang has 70,000 with no problems except for self induced ones. It works for me and is cost effective.
 

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For me 5 years is the max because I dont want my hoses to go any longer than that.

My Civic had 300k + on it when it was wrecked and the aluminum looked as good as new. The aluminum guys sure have it figured out.
 

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I use Evans Waterless coolant in my radiator, a bit pricey, but love that it lowers the PSI from 16 lbs. to 7 lbs. for the radiator cap and hoses, and I've never overheated in Phoenix. It has a 10 year life span, so I have 1 more year to go before I need to change it.
I also use Evans. My aluminum intake has been eaten up over the years due to the water based coolants so I switched over to keep it and other parts from further corrosion. The lower pressure is better for the hoses and as it will not boil at lower temps, IF my engine should ever overheat, it will not develop hot spots due to steam. This is my 1st and only car with Evans, and so far there have been no issues in the past 2 years that have caused it to above 230 deg.
 
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