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I see aftermarket pulleys. AC cars always had an overdriven water pump to move more coolant and spin the fan faster. My factory air 65 C code car has a 5 7/8" water pump pulley and 6 1/2" crank, which gives an 11% overdrive on the water pump. Yours look to be underdrive pulleys.
 

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I see aftermarket pulleys. AC cars always had an overdriven water pump to move more coolant and spin the fan faster. My factory air 65 C code car has a 5 7/8" water pump pulley and 6 1/2" crank, which gives an 11% overdrive on the water pump. Yours look to be underdrive pulleys.
A/C cars also had a Hot Idle Compensator, to increase the idle speed at higher ambient temperatures as well as a radiator with FEWER fins per inch so as not to overly restrict airflow.
 

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1966 289 2V Coupe FMX Transmission 9-inch Axle
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Check out this thread, a lot of good information.

 

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Look up the cfm rating on your electric fan. Many of these fans do not flow enough to cool a v8 engine. I think the minimum recommended is 2800 cfm for a decent V8 engine and that is a bit hard to find in a single fan. The fan companies also kind of cheat on their cfm ratings and list free flow. Well, a fan doesn't ever cool running in free flow. It is smashed up against the back of a radiator and has to pull through the resistance of the radiator fins.
 

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Any thoughts on a high flow water pump ? Does it make a difference?
i like the FlowKooler pumps. Their impeller design is much more efficient than the OEM type pumps. They move the coolant much faster at rpm’s under 3,000 which is exactly where most of the overheating issues occur.


Z
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Just wanted to update everyone... I ended up swapping out my water heater for a GMB high flow water pump from Summit. It mentioned 15 - 20 degrees cooler

Did another flush, all new hoses during the swap and I'm now running 195 degrees at the peak, with AC blowing full blast the entire time

Thanks for all of your help and suggestions
 

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I would expect nothing less.

Using the FlowKooler’s advanced impellers on original Ford HiPo pumps has always been successful for me.

Z
 

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1966 GT Fastback, 289 EFI, T5z
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I'll keep you posted.
I said I would post everybody on the results of the larger radiator experiment ... here is my jumping off point:

My solution to this problem - in progress - is to experiment with a larger capacity radiator, but this is a real challenge in a Gen 1 Mustang. The original structure of this car is sacred to me, and I am not going to cut up the core support. I have found a side-tank, double-pass, cross-flow (rather than down-flow) aluminum radiator with a 3" deep core that fits reasonably well in the available space. The core face area is 315 sq in (matches the rule of thumb for my car), and the core support only impinges into the face area by ~ 3/8". I am hopeful that the additional flow, coolant capacity and face area will restore some degree of control so the thermostat can actually do its job.

Gen 1 Mustangs are famous for having not having a lot of space up front for radiators (or anything else actually). However, I am pleased to report that I was able to install my new 24"-wide, side-tank, double-pass, cross-flow aluminum radiator in the engine bay without cutting the core support or drilling any new holes in the car itself.

The first thing I did was reconfigure my battery box so that the battery could be rotated 90 degrees; this gave 3-4 more inches of width to work with. This change had the additional benefit of hiding the collection of wires under the solenoid.

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I fabbed up 2 u-shaped long brackets out of 1 1/2" wide, 1/8" thick aluminum bar stock and fitted them with adjustable feet at the bottom. These u-brackets bolted to the stock four 5/16"-18 speed nut holes in the front core support and the feet stood on the welded frame members below. I glued rubber gasketing to the brackets, and these captured the radiator all the way around the side tank weld beads firmly but gently.

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The width between the u-brackets turned out to be just perfect to support my existing electric fan and shroud with four 1/4"-20 bolts. I also made two smaller brackets to support the overflow tank and attached that to the drivers-side u-bracket . Lastly, I fabbed up two more brackets to capture the top of the radiator and the two open upper ends of the u-brackets on both sides. Since I am a fan (no pun intended) of "bling" in the engine bay, I polished all the new brackets and the tank itself to a high shine - it's just how I roll.

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A couple of good things about this install. The radiator sits back a little further away from the A/C condenser, which is supposed to help diminish the direct heat load on the radiator. Also, the cooling tubes and fins are recessed inside the edges of the side tanks, so virtually all of the new front face of the larger radiator is exposed to the core support opening. The radiator sits lower in the engine bay, so you don't have a big top radiator tank in your field of view when you open the hood. My final improvement on this install will be to install new silicone radiator hoses with Gates Power Clamps to clean up the hose look; the ones in these photos are temporary. I really do like the way this radiator fits and the way it looks.

Oh wait - it's supposed to a radiator, not an art project, right? OK - here goes: the car started right up, there were no water leaks anywhere and no bad mechanical sounds. So far, so good. It was actually a good test day - 92 degrees, hot and humid. The car initially went to 180 degrees (thermostat setting), and idled there until fully warmed up. I then turned the A/C on full blast, and drove the car around for about 20 minutes. With the A/C on, driving at low speed, the temperature went to about 195, and eventually to about 210 degrees but never higher, whether moving or sitting stopped a light. This is an improvement (about 15 degrees cooler) over what I had before, and it's acceptable (I said elsewhere in this post that I could live with 210-214, and that is what I now have), but I have to admit I was hoping for a more dramatic reduction. @MustangKJE seems to have found another good solution by installing a higher capacity water pump, so maybe I will do that as well.
 

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“…….(I said elsewhere in this post that I could live with 210-214, and that is what I now have), but I have to admit I was hoping for a more dramatic reduction.
please give this some consideration :

…..you don’t want your car running much (or any !!!) under 210 F for any length of time. Under 212 F and the water vapor present in your crankcase will not evaporate out of the oil and it will become sludge. Sludge does not lubricate your engine worth a damn. Is that what you want as an unintended consequence ???

To repeat a previous post, the stock (195) thermostat that the Ford engineers put in your car, and millions of other cars they designed from the ground up, didn’t even fully open until 210-212 F. That is bottom temperature the engineers wanted these engines to run at, not anything cooler.

it may be hard for us to admit at times, but despite the progress of the last 50 years, we do not know better than the engineers who designed these cars when it comes to the best temperature for the engines to be most efficient.

Z
 

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1966 GT Fastback, 289 EFI, T5z
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please give this some consideration :

…..you don’t want your car running much (or any !!!) under 210 F for any length of time. Under 212 F and the water vapor present in your crankcase will not evaporate out of the oil and it will become sludge. Sludge does not lubricate your engine worth a damn. Is that what you want as an unintended consequence ???

To repeat a previous post, the stock thermostat that the Ford engineers put in your car, and millions of other cars they designed from the ground up, didn’t even fully open until 210-212 F. That is bottom temperature the engineers wanted these engines to run at, not anything cooler.

it may be hard for us to admit at times, but despite the progress of the last 50 years, we do not know better than the engineers who designed these cars when it comes to the best temperature for the engines to be most efficient.

Z
Good guidance, and point taken - I do not want sludge or coking. What I was / am trying to achieve is some degree of temperature control with the cooling system. Thereafter, I can set an appropriate operating temperature by selection of the right thermostat.
 
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