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1. what is the proper procedure to bleed the brake sys after a complete replacement? I cant seem to build any pressure in the lines.

2. in routing the fuel line from fender to carb, should the aftermarket canister-type fuel filter be before or after the mechnical pump?

thanks in advance!
 

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There are several methods depending on the equipment you have. If you have another helper and a length of clear hose that fits over the bleeder valve, you can use the method I use. Have your helper sit in the car, and put the clear hose on the bleeder valve you'll be working with, leading into a jar of some sort. Starting with the Right(pass.)rear wheel, have your helper pump the brakes a few times and then hold the pedal down. You then open the bleeder screw until his (or her) foot hits the floor, then tighten it back up and tell him to release and pump again. Do this until you see no bubbles in the clear hose leading to the jar anymore, making sure that the master cylinder never goes empty. Then proceed to the Left rear wheel and do the same. Then to the right front, and finally the left front. It will take some time and some fluid, but it has always worked for me. You can also use a one-man bleeding kit, but I've never used one so I'll let others fill you in on that. Johnpro loves his speed bleeders too, which replace your bleeder valves and act as a check valve so you can just pump the brakes until the air is out. I really like using the clear tube though because I can see when the air is all gone.
 

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what is the proper procedure to bleed the brake sys after a complete replacement? I cant seem to build any pressure in the lines.
Woohoo! A question I can answer. I've just done this after a master cylinder rebuild.

With a helper the procedure we used is essentially the same as listed by bratpane. I found one of our local stores had a "universal bleeder" gizmo that would have allowed me to do this myself. You connect a tube (preferably clear) to the rear passenger side bleeder screw, open it 3/4 of a turn and get someone to press the brake. While they are holding it down you tighten the screw up they release it and you repeat. If you can get a tube with a one way valve you don't need the assistant, you just attach the pipe, open the screw and pump. Once the passenger side rear is done you do the drivers side rear, then the passenger side front, then the drivers side front.

Speed bleeders/bleed tools with one way valves make it easier. Make sure that you never let the master cylinder get empty (keep checking as you go round). The bleed tool was useful... except that the universal adapter wouldn't fit on the rear brakes (so I pulled it off and used the pipe/valve combo without it) and it was too long to fit on the front brakes (there was a piece of metal in the way) so I had to use a piece of pipe without a valve.

The only other advice I found was to keep the end of the pipe in brake fluid so that if anything does get sucked in, it isn't air.

Remember to tighten all of the bleeders when you are finished with them or you won't get pressure. Also look to see if the wheel cylinders are leaking, and check the conditions of the pipes. If none of these help has your master cylinder gone? You can rebuild your master cylinder and probably the wheel cylinders easily enough.

I hope that this helps,

Z.
 

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Hello_On the brakes,as has been said,go RR,LR,RF then LF.I always put the in-line filter between the tank and the pump because I personally think that they are ugly and disrupt the appearance of the engine bay.Also,there isn't supposed to be one of those on the car anyway,so I try to hide it as much as possible.Hope that helps. :)
 

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If you replaced the MC, you must bench bleed it first, or you'll never get the air out of the lines. After that ... Speed Bleeders, baby! I installed them in my '66 a few months ago. I can bleed my brakes, by myself in a about 10 minutes now. The order, no matter which method you choose is LR, RR, RF, LF.

The fuel filter ideally will go after the pump, but it doesn't matter much. If you're using the original hard lines, about the only 2 places you can put it is at the gas tank or just before the carb.
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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JohnPro beat me to it. Bleed the master cylinder before all else. Although the process is called "bench bleeding", it can easily be done on the car. New master cylinders often come with plastic fittings and 2 disposable hoses to ease this process and keep brake fluid out of the engine bay.
I buy the reusable glass fuel filters. I put them between the pump and carb if for no other reason than it makes them readily inspectable. It's sometimes nice to know at a glance that you are indeed getting gas to the carb.
A metal type filter can pretty much be installed wherever you like. You might prefer it out sight and a little harder to service than vice versa. Though it's important to have a fuel filter "in front" of an electric pump, mechanical pumps are quite tolerant and will happily pump through any bits of contaminants that are likely to be in your fuel lines.
 

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And remember as you are going wheel to wheel bleeding to stop and refill the master cylinder back up with FLUID!! :: If it goes dry you will start all over putting air into the system.. ::
 

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always bleed farthest away wheel that has not been bled in sequence - pas side rear, drv side rear, pas side front, drv side front. one reply contained error in this sequence. after going around you always start at beginning (pas rear) and continue around.
 
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