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A few holes on drivers side cowl. I’m thinking repairing, applying platinum rust encapsulator and closing up. This car (while I own it) will never see rain. I can see all around the hat and the out board side of the cowl is the worst, but I think I can close up these holes.
The rest of the cowl appears to be in good shape... do I replace entire cowl or repair what I can and move on?
 

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I would save as much of the original cowl that you can. If those holes are the only issue I would cut back to solid metal and weld in a patch. My preference for a protective coat is Master Series Silver.
 

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Thats no Gouda! I have used Por 15 and fiberglass mesh in similar situations with success. Some will say you have to go gonzo and replace everything for the generations that follow. I say when I'm dead I won't care so much about my Mustang.
 

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It is a PITA to do a full cowl repair no doubt. I used fiberglass on my 68 rear wheel wells when I was in high school. The issue I have with the cowl is that is is a structural component that basically ties in the front end and keeps it from twisting. So long as you are not concerned you are losing any structural integrity, have at the easier repair. If it looks like it's not really intact anymore you might want to consider fixing it the right way.
 

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That's far from Swiss cheese...try this....
20191122_163255.jpg

Now, I have one car that is solid as a rock, and another that had a couple small pin holes like yours, which also appears to have a couple of pen-size holes, too.
I would use a metal putty to close the larger holes and use something like POR-15 or some other total rust encapsulator throughout the cowl. I made a 360° wand and used a pump sprayer at home to spray the entire inside of the cowl...it will probably outlast the rest of the car. The car the cowl vent hat from above came from ? Yeah. It's gonna need major reconstructive surgery. That's okay. My son's worth it.
20190725_185822.jpg
 

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That ain't Swiss cheese... This is Swiss cheese.
Mine is a 69 so there are no repair kits. I had to replace the whole thing. As stated earlier, the cowl is structural so whatever gets cut out would have to be welded in when repaired, not glued. You've got the weight of the engine, the torque it produces, and all the front suspension and steering components working on it.
IMG_20150913_241020956_HDR.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's far from Swiss cheese...try this.... View attachment 763290
Now, I have one car that is solid as a rock, and another that had a couple small pin holes like yours, which also appears to have a couple of pen-size holes, too.
I would use a metal putty to close the larger holes and use something like POR-15 or some other total rust encapsulator throughout the cowl. I made a 360° wand and used a pump sprayer at home to spray the entire inside of the cowl...it will probably outlast the rest of the car. The car the cowl vent hat from above came from ? Yeah. It's gonna need major reconstructive surgery. That's okay. My son's worth it. View attachment 763297
Holy Cowl!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Going to repair in-place. Cut out the old and weld in patch/patches. Upper corner of firewall is also being repaired so I’ll access the cowl bottom from there. 🤞
 

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Holy Cowl!
Yeah, I was moving the car by hand and stepped on something...it was that piece of the cowl hat. It went through the hole in the passenger floor pan of the same size.. Funny thing is, the driver side and the rest of the car is really solid ! I guess just the one side was stopped up and rotted years ago. The fellow I got the car from had the car covered for years so it was dry as a bone. It hasn't been registered or on the road since 1976 !!
 
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I actually stuck an old phone up inside mine after the POR-15 dried and video'd the inside to make sure I got every spot covered. I pressed several layers of tape onto the cowl vent ribs behind the hood and removed them promptly before it dried so I didn't get any outside the cowl or onto the hood. Some of it ran out the drain holes and is still stuck to my garage floor. That is some tough stuff! NO LEAKS !!
 
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Why did you choose to weld in The bottom rather than weld the two together and then weld in. I’ve seen both ways.
 

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An example of what mice can do to a cowl...

Rust.jpg


I think it would have leaked a little, especially since you could see the concrete through the top cowl opening. No saving this one.

Cowl.jpg

Every cowl that I have installed, (and will install) will be done in two pieces. The ability to get everything, sealed around the hats, painting everything with epoxy and a top coat (like above, if requested) to keep it lasting much longer than the original non painted parts, and the ability to align it better are a few reasons I can think up. Not a bad repair to do, but a bunch of prep work is needed for it to turn out correctly.

Cowl 2.jpg
 
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A few holes on drivers side cowl. I’m thinking repairing, applying platinum rust encapsulator and closing up. This car (while I own it) will never see rain. I can see all around the hat and the out board side of the cowl is the worst, but I think I can close up these holes.
The rest of the cowl appears to be in good shape... do I replace entire cowl or repair what I can and move on?
I have a original top cowl that I took of my car it’s in great shape if you want it!
 

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Why did you choose to weld in The bottom rather than weld the two together and then weld in. I’ve seen both ways.
As Latoracing said, you get better access and better alignment installing it as 2 pieces. I installed mine that way as well(though I actually re-used my original upper cowl since it was in good shape)
 

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Why did you choose to weld in The bottom rather than weld the two together and then weld in. I’ve seen both ways.
My cousin is the welder and thats the way he was taught - he has done over 25 of them and has it down to a science.
 

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Jerry I looked at your profile you are right down the street from me!
 
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