Vintage Mustang Forums banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hot Rod Magazine just published a "Coyote Swap Guide" online yesterday:

5.0L Coyote Modular V-8 Swap Guide

Of course, there are more options available, since they didn't mention AJE for the suspension, Hydratech Braking for Hydroboost units and Tanks, Inc., for Fuel tanks and/or in-tank fuel systems

AJE kits:

64-70 Mustang

Hydratech Braking:

Welcome to Hydratech Braking Systems :: High Performance Hydraulic Brake Assist Systems

Tanks, Inc,:

TANKS Inc. gas tanks for street rods, muscle cars, custom cars and trucks
 
  • Like
Reactions: bdthome

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The computer set ups aren't exactly plug and play either. Ford racing harness/computer are supposed to be, but we used FAST and let's just say they need some "tweaking"
Yes the FAST system doesn't have the ability to use the Variable Valve Timing of the Coyote engines . . . only the Ford Racing PCM has that ability at this point (they point this out in the article) :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
...only the Ford Racing PCM has that ability at this point...
I plan to use the AEM Performance Electronics "Infinity" ECU which
does control variable cam like for the Coyote. Can't be used on new
cars, of course. Off-road only. Emissions and rules and all that. But
I think they offer a Coyote package with the wiring harness, ECU,
and a baseline program. Perfect for the rodder living away from
the Left coast...

AEM | Engineered to Outperform

To me, the coolest features available in their system are A) traction/
launch control and B) fuel map switching for "economy" and
"track" modes.

Worth investigating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
I would use the Ford racing harness and computer if you aren't going supercharged. However, mine is supercharged and I let Roush program the computer, but it took 3 trips to Roush for them to finally program it correctly since they kept forgetting that mine was aftermarket and not a computer from a modern mustang.
If i were to do this swap again, I would go with the detroit speed front end and twin supercharge the engine. The supercharger sits too high, regardless of which front suspension system you use, and therefore a custom hood is required. Just my .02
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
I've been all for the R&C front suspension, but I too am nearly sold on
the DSE Aluma-Frame due to it's superior geometry and strength. I still
have one question left to explore: how low and back can a Coyote be
placed using the DSE Aluma-Frame? From what I've seen, it seems to
locate the Coyote engine rather high and forward. I can't find detailed
build photos or specs on the web regarding clearance underneath, or
how much room exists at the front for an alternator and A/C compressor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've been all for the R&C front suspension, but I too am nearly sold on
the DSE Aluma-Frame due to it's superior geometry and strength. I still
have one question left to explore: how low and back can a Coyote be
placed using the DSE Aluma-Frame? From what I've seen, it seems to
locate the Coyote engine rather high and forward. I can't find detailed
build photos or specs on the web regarding clearance underneath, or
how much room exists at the front for an alternator and A/C compressor.
I personally prefer the simple design of the AJE kit, especially since it maintains the use of the original components to maintain structural rigidity--none of the solutions that use a bolt-in or weld-in crossmember do this, they rely upon the attachment of the frame rails to the floorpan, and these Mustangs (and all unibody cars, for that matter) were never designed for this configuration . . .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
I personally prefer the simple design of the AJE kit...
This thread is really dealing with Coyote options more than all
aftermarket suspension choices. Any kit that retains the original
shock towers must be rejected when a Coyote engine is used.

Sure, you can install Boss 9 towers (yuck) or chop the originals
down to a sliver. This may be workable with MacPherson struts
if you don't mind zero wiggle room around the engine. But why
bother? Just yank the towers, reinforce as needed, and be done
with it. I want lots of room for my headers, steering, and whatnot.

...none of the solutions that use a bolt-in or weld-in crossmember do this, they rely upon the attachment of the frame rails to the floorpan...
It's a given that these kits require the front rails to be triangulated
when the towers are removed. Just bend and weld tubing from the
rail front section back to the firewall. Add a triangulated firewall
brace and monte carlo bar. A nice, rigid cage (much stronger than
stock) now holds the front suspension in place.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,394 Posts
I would use the Ford racing harness and computer if you aren't going supercharged. However, mine is supercharged and I let Roush program the computer, but it took 3 trips to Roush for them to finally program it correctly since they kept forgetting that mine was aftermarket and not a computer from a modern mustang.
If i were to do this swap again, I would go with the detroit speed front end and twin supercharge the engine. The supercharger sits too high, regardless of which front suspension system you use, and therefore a custom hood is required. Just my .02
You better take a look at the 5.8 were doing with our MTF subframe, we have our stock hood on there with no modification .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
This thread is really dealing with Coyote options more than all
aftermarket suspension choices. Any kit that retains the original
shock towers must be rejected when a Coyote engine is used.

Sure, you can install Boss 9 towers (yuck) or chop the originals
down to a sliver. This may be workable with MacPherson struts
if you don't mind zero wiggle room around the engine. But why
bother? Just yank the towers, reinforce as needed, and be done
with it. I want lots of room for my headers, steering, and whatnot.



It's a given that these kits require the front rails to be triangulated
when the towers are removed. Just bend and weld tubing from the
rail front section back to the firewall. Add a triangulated firewall
brace and monte carlo bar. A nice, rigid cage (much stronger than
stock) now holds the front suspension in place.
Agree 100%. The coyote is a wide bitch. Anyone stuffing over 400 hp into these old cars better be doing some reinforcement in various areas anyways.

As for the supercharger, mine easily clears any of the hoods that MTF stocks with the Rod & Custom front end. There is a 69 coyote build with the Boss intake, (which is taller than the supercharger), and the Rod and Custom front end, and it too clears with off the shelf hoods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
Yes, there are a lot of options and they've been discussed in previous articles. The guide wasn't intended to be a end-all be-all piece with every suspension, header, pulley kit, etc. offering in the world available. The edit was designed more as a thought provoking piece to give readers ideas and to let them know what they're in for.

I love the Hydratech stuff and have it on two of our project cars, but it states right on their website they will not fit with modular engines. I did get mine to fit a 4.6 Three-Valve with rotating the accumulator, but the master cylinder is off of the cam cover by only a couple of millimeters it is so close!

Anyway, if you check out Mustang-360.com you'd also get these stories a couple of days sooner! Just sayin'... :D

Hope you enjoyed the piece...
Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,129 Posts
I think this thread took a left turn...lol! Try to talk to someone that is using the AEM before you decide...I've heard from a couple of tuners that they are still working out some bugs with it. Just for your own good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Mark, I greatly appreciate the article. I love reading anything about Coyote swaps in classic Mustangs. I get excited everytime I see a coyote build thread. It's a great article that points out the definite challenges this swap presents. A lot of the info seems to be older information that was out when I started my build in 2011 however. The fact that anyone still reccomends TCI for the coyote swap over most other suspensions clearly hasn't been reading the forums and the issues with that coyote combo setup. The Dougs Headers only work with the TCI setup since the motor sits so high with this system (requiring that custom hood mentioned above), and therefore will be dragging on the ground with many of the other suspension choices out there that plunk the motor lower. The transmission info was great. Always appreciate information from professional manufacturers and builders. Speaking of that, it would be great if one interviewed Scott Jensen from the Mustang Shop in Seattle as they build a lot of these cars with the coyote and seem to do awesome work.
A key company overlooked in your article is Mustangs to Fear with regards to innovating many of the parts required to make the swap as painless as possible. They have helped remove much of the voodoo surrounding this swap for the Everyman and professional alike with these parts. They now have their own suspension system, they designed a complete stainless exhaust system with full length headers, H- pipe, mufflers, all the way to the rear, worked with ABS to figure out the master cylinder, designed a foot pedal bracket andfoot pedals so you don't have to stare at the modern plastic one, power steering reservoir for the Vintage Air system, designed an aluminum radiator, with proper hoses, cold air intake, the list goes on. Check them out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Why don't people shave off the costs a little more by going with the F150 version? I know its a little less HP but if its initially the same (I could be wrong, I don't truly know) why don't people go that route?

**Ninja Edit**

Also, I'd like to contribute by saying if anyone doing this swap, any EFI, or otherwise, and considering the Aeromotive 64-68 Ford Mustang 340 Stealth Fuel Tank. PM I have a business/wholesale license I can't save a grave amount but we're looking at $625 shipped out the door.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
Arieon, I mention the F-150 Coyote option in the story. It is viable, though a little less HP. But if looking to save some money, a salvage yard would most likely sell you an F-150 Coyote for less than a Mustang Coyote. It's all in what the part comes out of when it comes to many yards!

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
I'd actually rather have the F-150 Coyote for a cruiser/driver. It's a
reliable, high-revving, torque monster less prone to detonation. The
problem is locating a low-mileage pullout in good shape that's
significantly less cost than a crate motor.

About $6K gets you a brand new Ford Racing crate engine with a
2-year warranty. Most F-150 Coyote pullouts I see with less than
20K miles are always around $3K to $4K with a 30-day return policy
and no warranty. Now if I could find these locally for around $2K,
then they would be a no-brainer. The risks would be more than
offset by the savings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
I would use the Ford racing harness and computer if you aren't going supercharged. However, mine is supercharged and I let Roush program the computer, but it took 3 trips to Roush for them to finally program it correctly since they kept forgetting that mine was aftermarket and not a computer from a modern mustang.
If i were to do this swap again, I would go with the detroit speed front end and twin supercharge the engine. The supercharger sits too high, regardless of which front suspension system you use, and therefore a custom hood is required. Just my .02
I'm in the same boat as you but I know that ROUSH's 2015 supercharger is about 1.5" shorter than the 2012 which I'm running.. It's possible to use the stock hood.. Ugh…
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top