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I am in the middle of a Coyote swap. I agree with the amount of change, both modifications and cash, is significantly different. I used the Coyotes predecessor a 4.6L DOHC modular in a Factory Five Cobra build. I loved that engine as it loved to rev. In the lighter Cobra replica, that engine was a lot of fun and returned great mileage.
I took on my Coyote swap thinking I knew what I was getting into. The scope of the effort far exceeds what I thought the build would take. I agree with the comments here, your best solution is to build a nice 331 or 347. Keeps the original appearance with increased fun factor at a more budget friendly price point.
 

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Yeah these two are worlds apart. Chopping towers, totally changing the front suspension type, adding an EFI fuel system, wiring, gauges, custom bellhousing for that TKX, routing the exhaust, etc makes a $10,000 to $15,000 difference. You have to build the car around the Coyote, it's not something you choose for simplicity. With that said, it's better than the SBF in every way otherwise and I'm not sure I've ever seen anyone regret using one.
 

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1966 mustang coupe
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I really like the coyote engine but its just way overkill for this car.

The coyote is HUGE and honestly, 300ish hps is more than enough for the 65-66.

Dont forget you will have to get the tires and brakes etc to match the Coyote otherwise all this power is wasted anyway....

Windsor engine for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I've got 16" LW20's on Michelin Pilot Sports, disc brakes & coilovers. I'm ready to go, just going to upgrade the sway bar.
 

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I've got 16" LW20's on Michelin Pilot Sports, disc brakes & coilovers. I'm ready to go, just going to upgrade the sway bar.
Depending on your goals/expectations.

I setup my cars pretty balanced so i can push them hard through the corners and on the track.

I wouldnt run a coyote on my '66 without flares/widebody, really big tires, brakes and good suspensions.

If its just for show, burnouts you will be ok with your 16's.
 

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I have a ‘92 roller 302 bored .30 over.. balanced with GT40p heads, 9.5 to 1.. PF4.. pretty nicely built.. about 350 hp backed up with a T5z in my 66 HT. it’s a freaking hoot to drive..
 

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If you're going to swap out the engine get a crate motor. The coyote is over rated plus there's so much frame and suspension work that goes with that. You ca get the same HP out of a 408 or 427 small block crate without all the added work. it would be a waste of time and effort to go back with something like a 302 with about the same or a little HP as you already have. I went with a 408 and an AOD with a 3.55 rear gear.
 

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FT, that sounds exactly what I'm looking for.
To make your build the smoothest possible, stick with a 302 block. The deck height is lower and it is a slightly narrower engine. You’ll have less problems matching headers and more room to work in there. Personally, if I was doing it from scratch I’d go with a 347 (302 based.) You can fit a 351W, but a 347 will way out perform even a mildly modified chassis and deliver plenty of power and fun!
 

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I'll chime in as one of the guys that went the Coyote route. I installed the latest Gen 3 in mine, which came with a whole host of issues unto itself. Installing a Coyote is no small feat, especially for someone without the desire to get really into it. My car was out of commission for a couple of years (though that was for the complete install along with rust repair and everything else that goes into building one of these.)

For me, the benefit is plenty of power, great gas mileage, reliability, longevity, aftermarket support, and admittedly the "Wow" factor. The noise is also very unique for an old school Mustang. If you want a thumping V8 noise, this isn't the engine for you. I wanted an engine that was as comfortable on a road trip as it was on the track.

My Coyote required cutting out the shock towers, installing a whole new front suspension, cutting out the top of the transmission tunnel for a T-56, fabricating a place to bolt the computer, fabricating a custom set of headers (I used a steering box instead of rack and pinion, which most of the aftermarket parts are designed to fit around), fabricating a new exhaust, etc. It can be done in a home garage, but it's not for the faint of heart.

Then you need everything that goes with it: bigger radiator, new driveshaft, better brakes, pedal setup/support (you have to use the Coyote drive-by-wire-pedal), proper oil pan, maybe an oil cooler, the list goes on and on. I haven't even had mine tuned yet.

The commenter above was right, you build the car around the Coyote. I'm glad I did it, but if the car were already mostly done, I'd have probably gone with the crate 363.
 

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The locally built crate 427 Windsor just works in my "tank" '73 Mach 1. A very streetable torque monster that pull like no tomorrow.
 

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I have been reviewing these options for a while now as my '65 Fastback engine is toast. I did consider a Coyote as they are cheap--especially out of a wreck. But there is a ton of cutting and destruction to get that unit to fit and a crate motor makes easily as much HP. I'm going crate and likely going with BluePrint Engines unless between now and the time I am ready (about 3 months), I find out why I should NOT. I made this little spreadsheet of crate motors. I was also trying to compare HP to the weight against my '12 Shelby for reference. As well, I have read some pretty good things about the 363 engine, despite what some say about longevity. I tried to post the Excel so that sorting and filtering would be of help but this forum does not allow that extension. So PDF it is. Hope this helps.
Nice job ......I certainly appreciate the work you did. The 408 has a great ROI. I'm gonna PM you, ask you to e-mail me the excel.
 

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I am all for motor swaps....but cutting your shock towers out to make the same HP a crate SBF doesn't make any sense at all. That being said....400+HP out of any engine in these cars is rather silly unless you a building a track car. I have been there, done that...built engines that make a lot of HP....and then drove around on the street simply not using it 99.9% of the time. These days a moderate 300HP is enough for me, other aspects of the car like the suspension are far more important to me now. I think a lot of times people lose sight of balance when building cars...there may be a few people who drag race their cars, but for most of us, its a car we enjoy driving around. You don't need 400HP to drive in a spirited manner. I think when I realized that is when I bought a Miata....that car is pitiful in power production and slow in the 1/4 mile, but it is by far one of the most fun to drive cars around because it can take a turn, the transmission is tuned perfectly to the engine powerband and makes every drive fun.

If you ask me, the engine choice truly doesn't matter until it starts compromising handling....and that is the deal-breaker for me since most Coyote swaps end up being put in with the owners not caring that they are compromising handling(aside from suspension setups like Griggs, etc). Its like all the new EV cars coming out boasting huge HP and torque numbers...those numbers don't mean a thing when the cars can't take a curve or do 5 laps competitively at a road course like Willow Springs because of sheer weight.
 
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I am all for motor swaps....but cutting your shock towers out to make the same HP a crate SBF doesn't make any sense at all. That being said....400+HP out of any engine in these cars is rather silly unless you a building a track car. I have been there, done that...built engines that make a lot of HP....and then drove around on the street simply not using it 99.9% of the time. These days a moderate 300HP is enough for me, other aspects of the car like the suspension are far more important to me now. I think a lot of times people lose sight of balance when building cars...there may be a few people who drag race their cars, but for most of us, its a car we enjoy driving around. You don't need 400HP to drive in a spirited manner. I think when I realized that is when I bought a Miata....that car is pitiful in power production and slow in the 1/4 mile, but it is by far one of the most fun to drive cars around because it can take a turn, the transmission is tuned perfectly to the engine powerband and makes every drive fun.

If you ask me, the engine choice truly doesn't matter until it starts compromising handling....and that is the deal-breaker for me since most Coyote swaps end up being put in with the owners not caring that they are compromising handling(aside from suspension setups like Griggs, etc). Its like all the new EV cars coming out boasting huge HP and torque numbers...those numbers don't mean a thing when the cars can't take a curve or do 5 laps competitively at a road course like Willow Springs because of sheer weight.
Yep, seems like we share the same thinking on the subject.

To me, a balanced car is the way to go!

Power is useless when you cant brake or turn ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I've done the suspension and upgraded the brakes all around in prep for this. I've ruled out the Coyote, as most have mentioned, I don't want to cut up the car. I'm taking it to a local builder/race car team in a couple hours to get his feedback on what to go with. It sounds like 350-400HP is the sweet spot.
 
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