Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 20 of 61 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
1966 Mustang, 200 i6, C4 Cruise-O-Matic transmission. I'm 18 years old, the car was bought for me by my grandfather when I was 2 with the intention of it being my first car. Due to circumstances beyond my control, I have to use it as my daily driver :shrug:. Not saying that I don't love that, I do. I just worry about the car itself and what driving it daily means for the car. Seeing as winter is fast approaching in the US, I need to ensure that my car will get me to and from college and work everyday reliably while also minimizing risk of short & long-term damage to the car. I live in the mountains with elevations varying from 1,000-1,700ft above sea level. Plowing and salting the roads is common in prep for snow, here. Car only has 56k original miles on it, so worrying about catastrophic failure of the engine/transmission isn't likely.

Suggestions/solutions?

I've considered tire chains, possibly even swapping my diff to a LSD & freshly undercoating the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
A little different feedback than what I think you're expecting.... Give it a good tune-up before the cold weather hits. And make sure the choke is working. Chains won't be of any use if the car won't start when it's real cold outside.

Harry Z
 

·
Dimples
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
Man, that's unfortunate. You're going to have to regularly wash the under side of the car if you want to keep it from rusting away.

I would like to know more about these circumstances. If I were you I would be shopping for a cheap winter beater. These cars were solid drivers when they were new, but the cars that saw regular winter driving (salt) aren't around anymore, for the most part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,437 Posts
I drove my 67 with 200/c4 in the winter when I got stuck up north for a while. The car will be fine.

Of course my floors were pre-rusted with my Boston DSO, so that was taken car of already for me. The only problems I remember having in the snow were the starter solenoid and the antenna.

The solenoid just decided it didn't work anymore if the temperature was below freezing. Can't say I blame it and we don't really see much of that here in Florida.

The antenna just fell off one day in the snow. That one was just weird.

Just make sure everything's in order now before it gets cold, maybe throw some weight in the trunk, check your antifreeze is good and wash it regularly and you should be fine. Oh, maybe make sure the firewall holes are all plugged and the seals are good to keep that cold air out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
607 Posts
Instead of using money on the car to help it through the winter, then use those money on a "junk" car that can take you through the winter. Driving on salty roads will kill that old car faster than you want to know. I say that as an car guy that have lived all his life in that type of climate and seen what it does to cars. It may be possible make an old car survive it, but I'm sure you then gonna use more time on washing and cleaning than driving the car. The snow and cold are not a problem, but a combo of humid climate and salt are like dipping the car in acid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
A little different feedback than what I think you're expecting.... Give it a good tune-up before the cold weather hits. And make sure the choke is working. Chains won't be of any use if the car won't start when it's real cold outside.

Harry Z
I did take that into consideration. I need to get the battery checked too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
The car was garage kept so the chassis is still like new. I'm in the upper South, so it isn't like Jersey snow or something. But when it hits it hits hard. Like a foot or more and it stays iced over for sometimes 4 days. Since it isn't an everyday thing in winter here like in the north, they go all out on clearing the roads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,134 Posts
I've considered tire chains, possibly even swapping my diff to a LSD & freshly undercoating the car.
A little weight in the trunk will help. Use the old "town and country" type snow tires if they still make them - "all season" tires don't help much in the snow.

Instead of an undercoating that will trap moisture against the body and accelerate rust, consider having it sprayed with an oil or oil/paraffin mix.

If you have one of those car washes that wash underneath the car, do it on a warmish day as often as you can after a snow and salt bath.

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Here's one currently on fleabay. $11k. Look close, it has snow tires.

+1 on the oil and wax for undercoating and frequent car washes. Check the plugs on all the holes on chassis. Buy a cowl cover for parking lot at work.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,825 Posts
Well you could cancel the insurance on your car during the winter. A real bummer you have to drive what sounds like a relatively pristine car like that through the salt.

When I was in high school I fixed up my dad's 78 LTDII and was my own daily driver all the way through highschool. It was a nice car...big 2 door coupe, new interior, new paint job, wheel, tires, rechromed bumpers. I didn't drive it in the winters during high school and I went real slow down our gravel road.

Then I went to college and was forced to drive it in the winter. After 4 years of that my body started rotting out.

I had a 351M and C4 transmission, rear wheel drive. Had BFG Radial 10's on it, 275's on the back but drove on those all year round, including in the snow. You just have to drive smart and safe and your car will get you around. Snow tires do help a lot if you want to go that investment. But, I lived without them at that age with a horrible rear wheel drive car to boot. Some of the worst winter driving I ever did was in that car too.

Get a lot of coats of wax on it and run the car through the wash as much as you can to keep the salt off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
There is no way under any circumstances that I would drive a nice 56K miles Mustang on ice or even snow. You need to figure something else out. On ice, you are just going to sit there and spin the tires anyway. Braking will be hairy too. Some idiot will probably slide into you too. Get a ride to work on those bad weather days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,999 Posts
Whatever you do don't have the car undercoated as that is certain death. I still have a rust free 2002 F150 in the heart of the salt belt using Fluid Film lanolin-based rust inhibitor. https://www.fluid-film.com

I bought a gun like this from this guy a while back with all the accessories to apply it. https://www.kellsportproducts.com/Fluid-Film®-Woolwax®-Pro-Undercoating-Gun_p_16.html Every November I spend a weekend in hell underneath the cars applying this stuff. I take off every door panel to gain access to as much as I can and it works. You might want to consider the plexiglass covers for the cowl as well for the salty days.

My wife drove a 67 Mustang year round from 1991 to 1999 and it was a constant battle with rust. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,999 Posts
There is no way under any circumstances that I would drive a nice 56K miles Mustang on ice or even snow. You need to figure something else out. On ice, you are just going to sit there and spin the tires anyway. Braking will be hairy too. Some idiot will probably slide into you too. Get a ride to work on those bad weather days.
My wife drove through 8 Northern Indiana winters in a 67 with 205/75R/14 radial whitewalls with a couple of bags of sand in the trunk and might have got stuck once or twice. It stinks that he has to drive the car through a winter but it certainly isn't the end of the world if he does the proper prep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
My 6 cyl 64 1/2 Mustang was great in the snow. It's a shame you have to run it through the snow, but that's life sometimes. A good battery and a tune up will keep you rolling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Wow. I hate to agree with everyone but....Yes you most certainly can drive a 66 mustang in the winter with lots of great advice if you choose to do that, BUT....a winter beater that you switch insurance on and off on would be the best. Where is the "upper south"? Upper South New Jersey, Upper South Tenn, Upper South Kentucky? Good luck young man you are in for a great adventure but should come out fine if you follow the advice given here whichever choice you make. If you do drive it I would invest in the best tires you can afford.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
This is the exact reason why when I was in college, I "invested" in a cheap $500 beater to get me through the winter. Parked my mustang in a friend's outbuilding and drove the beater through the winter and guess what, a $500 car doesn't lose much value when you sell it 5 months later. I never lost any money and in some cases resold for $100 more or so.
 
1 - 20 of 61 Posts
Top