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1968 Ford Mustang Fastback “McQueen Movie Car” Tribute (Currently 289 HiPo Spec / T5 / 9” w/ 3.89 TT
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought (from a VMF vendor no less) a rather pricey pair of OEM Ford D0OA 1970-73 Mustang Drum Brake spindles to use with a Trans Am type front brake kit. The seller’s camera wasn’t the best, so I asked him if there were any signs of spun bearings, and then just questions about the general condition of the spindles; threads, seal surface, etc. After getting them cleaned up, the pins don’t show any signs of a spun bearing, but the shoulder that the inner wheel bearing tightens up against is grooved worse than on any other pair of spindles I’ve seen!

I know there are a few threads on here about this grooving on the pin shoulder. The consensus seemed split between the surface being inconsequential to proper operation, and grooving being a total no-go = throw the spindles away. Before I accuse this vendor of ripping me off (I’m not naming names until I speak with him about the issue), can I please get some input on which way to go? Is there a way to repair this surface? Is repair necessary?

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CJ, while I am NOT the person to answer your question, keep in mind even if the wear IS a problem, that surface can be built up and refinished to repair the spindle, so don't throw them out even if you think they're 'bad'. The shops that work on over the road heavy trucks can do it. The very large spindles on them are too expensive to just 'throw away' like the car & light truck guys do. LSG
 

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I'm not seeing anything that would give me cause for great concern, although I would mention it to the seller so he can check for it next time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
CJ, while I am NOT the person to answer your question, keep in mind even if the wear IS a problem, that surface can be built up and refinished to repair the spindle, so don't throw them out even if you think they're 'bad'. The shops that work on over the road heavy trucks can do it. The very large spindles on them are too expensive to just 'throw away' like the car & light truck guys do. LSG
While I know that it’s a forging, a weld repair would make me nervous. I would rather they just be turned down on a lathe, though I guess even pushing the hub a tiny bit inward can have some adverse affects, and the bearing might then hit the radius before it seated on the shoulder.

Also, this car is going to be tracked, which is why I wanted to upgrade to the bigger 70-73 spindle in the first place. I DO plan to have these magnafluxed before using, but I wasn’t sure how critical this surface is.
 

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1968 Ford Mustang Fastback “McQueen Movie Car” Tribute (Currently 289 HiPo Spec / T5 / 9” w/ 3.89 TT
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
those are wore out. it happens. It is possible to have them turned down and have a Coleman GN pin welded over the turned down pin and the spindle used on a race car.

Yeah, well, I’ve got a $500 set of hubs to fit these specific spindles, so…that’s a non starter. So, you’re one vote for telling the guy who sold me these that I want my money back?
 

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IMHO, that wear is the evidence of a worn out inner bearing, where the rollers allowed the outer race (and hub) to travel too far inward. The inner race of the bearing is going to seat along the radius of the pin and will not extend out into the "worn" area. As long as the inner bearing has the proper amount of runout you should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
IMHO, that wear is the evidence of a worn out inner bearing, where the rollers allowed the outer race (and hub) to travel too far inward. The inner race of the bearing is going to seat along the radius of the pin and will not extend out into the "worn" area. As long as the inner bearing has the proper amount of runout you should be fine.
I like what you’re saying, Bart, because it means that my spindles are NOT shot, but I’m scratching my head trying to understand what caused the damage…the cage!? Because the bearing “cup” is a larger diameter than that shoulder.
 

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I like what you’re saying, Bart, because it means that my spindles are NOT shot, but I’m scratching my head trying to understand what caused the damage…the cage!? Because the bearing “cup” is a larger diameter than that shoulder.
That would be my guess. A seized bearing that spun would severely "bugger up" the inner part of the spindle pin and fillet.
 

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I like what you’re saying, Bart, because it means that my spindles are NOT shot, but I’m scratching my head trying to understand what caused the damage…the cage!? Because the bearing “cup” is a larger diameter than that shoulder.
I was an auto mechanic for 10 years in the 70's and 80's. I have been a roadrace mechainc since 1975. I have seen many spindles like this. Too tight bearing preload, lack of grease, loose bearing, or dragging bearing can cause this. When it gets really worn there is not enough threads on the spindle to preload the bearings. Also the rotor moves farther inward and can touch the caliper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I was an auto mechanic for 10 years in the 70's and 80's. I have been a roadrace mechainc since 1975. I have seen many spindles like this. Too tight bearing preload, lack of grease, loose bearing, or dragging bearing can cause this. When it gets really worn there is not enough threads on the spindle to preload the bearings. Also the rotor moves farther inward and can touch the caliper.
Well, so, to that end. I’ve got nearly a quarter inch of extra threads on the spindle. And I’m running an aftermarket brake (Lincoln Caliper) that uses shims to center the caliper over the rotor, so, if I can center the rotor in the caliper, and I have adequate preload, and new bearings, is there ANY reason NOT to run these spindles!?

Keep in mind, I plan on magnafluxing these, also…

Also, didn’t Scott Drake have a bunch of spindle failures a few years ago? I really hate trusting their QC to critical pieces…
 

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Well, so, to that end. I’ve got nearly a quarter inch of extra threads on the spindle. And I’m running an aftermarket brake (Lincoln Caliper) that uses shims to center the caliper over the rotor, so, if I can center the rotor in the caliper, and I have adequate preload, and new bearings, is there ANY reason NOT to run these spindles!?

Keep in mind, I plan on magnafluxing these, also…

Also, didn’t Scott Drake have a bunch of spindle failures a few years ago? I really hate trusting their QC to critical pieces…
some of the first repo spindles were cast and broke. the ones they make now are forged. I also recommend having them shot peened. Do not shot peen the pin or bolt and pin holes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Magnaflux them and check the runout. If both check good, run them.
Thanks Patrick. I can’t see why I wouldn’t be able to run them if these things check out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
some of the first repo spindles were cast and broke. the ones they make now are forged. I also recommend having them shot peened. Do not shot peen the pin or bolt and pin holes.
Well, thanks for letting me know. I’ll keep those in my back pocket. If I had known there was a forged aftermarket spindle available, not to mention at such a decent price, I don’t think I would have ever gone for the 50 year old OEM spindle…but now I own these.
 

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I knew that Scott Drake made spindles but I thought they were the small bearing type. I didn’t know that they make the big bearing type as well (or is it instead?)
 

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To answer your question, I would reuse them. Try 4 centered punch peens. Slightly over torque the spindle nut to seat the bearing race to the spindle, loosen, re-tighten to get your pre-load. You have nothing to loose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
To answer your question, I would reuse them. Try 4 centered punch peens. Slightly over torque the spindle nut to seat the bearing race to the spindle, loosen, re-tighten to get your pre-load. You have nothing to loose.
Thanks. I don’t know that they need to be peened, as that wear isn’t really in a critical dimension.

The main reason that I made the post, was because if I were the seller, I would have disclosed that these had a major groove worn in them. But then again, I’m pickier than most. I wanted to try and get a consensus from the forum of whether or not I was being unreasonable. Is this considered normal wear, and/or is this a perfectly usable part? I wanted to suss that out before contacting the seller and asking for a refund.

So, in that sense, if these are “shot”, and the seller would refund me, then I do have “something” to lose…a couple hundred bucks and change in fact, by modifying them, and “trying” to use them unsuccessfully.

I guess I could try to use them “as-is”, and still maybe ask for a refund later if I can’t keep the bearings properly tightened, or if there is a bunch of runout, etc…
 

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I wouldnt run them.

You will always ne nervous so take that out of the equation and get a set that meets your expectations.
 
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