Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,965 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My engine is just about ready to go in. The short block was professionally assembled by Cliff Cline, at Classic Automotive Machine.

He did all the machine work and the heads.

I assembled the rest.

Here's the parts of my work that I am having doubts about now. Please advise me if my doubts are warranted.

1) I KNOW I read SOMEWHERE to clean threads on all head bolts, chase the threads in the block, and oil the threads prior to torquing I.A.W. torque sequence. Now I'm reading that SEALER needs to be on the threads because the bolts penetrate the water jacket.

I feel that I could remove 1 bolt at a time, put sealer on threads, and re-torque. One problem...the block threads have oil in them and the sealer won't bond.??

2) I was concerned with keeping oil from leaking at the joint where the timing cover, block, and oil pan meet. I clamped a piece of flat bar on the block on the oil pan mounting face, and let the bottom surface of the timing cover sit on the same flat bar's surface as I tightened the timing cover bolts. Now I'm thinking that since I did that, the seal may not be perfectly centered on the crankshaft.

I probably should have let the SEAL locate the front cover while tightening the bolts, and the removed metal on the bottom surface to to avoid an oil leak. What do you guys think??

3) I installed a dual roller timing set. I temporarily installed the oil slinger and timing cover and snugged up a couple of bolts. I had 0.060" clearance between the front face of the slinger and the inside of the timing cover.
I wanted the slinger because it functions to sling oil on the timing chain so it doesn't run dry.

The Crank cannot migrate 0.060" to the rear when the engine is running can it?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,960 Posts
i always put oil on those threads and run them down in the block and the take some sillycone and put on a phillips screwdriver shaft and circle it around the threads in the block and never had a leak. oil on the threads doesnt hurt the sillycone sealer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,960 Posts
2) I was concerned with keeping oil from leaking at the joint where the timing cover, block, and oil pan meet. I clamped a piece of flat bar on the block on the oil pan mounting face, and let the bottom surface of the timing cover sit on the same flat bar's surface as I tightened the timing cover bolts. Now I'm thinking that since I did that, the seal may not be perfectly centered on the crankshaft.

I probably should have let the SEAL locate the front cover while tightening the bolts, and the removed metal on the bottom surface to to avoid an oil leak. What do you guys think??
i always make sure the seal is centered on the crank. i have had timing covers that werent flush with the engine block and i put a little xtra sillycone on the uneven area and never had an oil pan to block/timing cover leak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,965 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Heck!

Heck Guy!!

Are you Mr. Silly?

It sounds like you have a vested interest in selling SILLYCONE!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,277 Posts
If we're talking about a 289 -351 I have never used a sealer on head bolts. You can't center the timing cover unless you use the balancer to do it and I don't think thats necessary. I've installed them flush with the bottom of the block and never had a leak. The rubber seal in most cases will take care of any slight differences. I don't think I've just been lucky over all these years and probably 50 engines or so. I've drag raced a lot of them without any oil leaks. I think you'll be alright with what you have going.
 

·
Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
Joined
·
20,669 Posts
1 The outer eight headbolts do indeed go into the water jacket. You can oil the threads or use thread sealer. I've just gone with oiling threads for years. When you torque down the bolts, you take ALL the lash out of the threads. This means the threads are down tight enought that there's pretty much no gap for the water to snake through. It is very remotely possible so some people play it safe. If it bothers you I don't see why you couldn't seal them one at a time. I often use Permatex "Aviation Form-a-Gasket" as a thread sealer. It doesn't seem to be affected by a little oil. I never use RTV on bolt threads. And RTV doesn't stick at all to anything oily.
2. Later model timing covers use locating dowels o n the timing covers. Notice those punchouts in the gasket to enlarge two of the lower bolt holes? Nice, but not really necessary. Lining up the seal with the balancer is indeed the suggested best method. But I happened to have noticed on a few of my engines that in any case the bottom of the timing cover tends to line up with the bottom of the block within a thousandth or two. I'd probably go with it but keep an eye on the area over time. But though it would be a pain to redo now, it's be a WHOLE lot more painful to do after the car is together. As with #1, go with what gives you peace of mind.
3. At the front of the lifter valley there is a hole the size of a quarter. After all that oil is pumped into the cam bearing, lifters, and rockers it has to flow back down to the oilpan. That hole is the biggest return opening. It happens to open out over the distributor gear and the timing set. So with the engine running the timimg set lives in a sort of water fall. I'm guessing the folks at Ford eventually figured out oil flowed downhill just fine, no need to try and sling it back up again so they quit using oil slingers. I always use double roller timing sets and toss the slinger if the engine happened to have one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I agree with tooponies, I have drag raced and built quite a few motors through the years (35 yrs) and have never put any sealer on the head bolts. I do put some oil on the threads just so I don't torque them dry. I have never centered the timing cover either, that is why there is the little spring in the seal to keep the seal against the balancer. I don't think you have any problems with what you have done.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top