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Discussion Starter #1
I'm in the process of replacing my old York A/C compressor with a new Sanden. It looked like a fairly easy job until I got into removing the large gas line from the evaporator. I dropped the evaporator and began working under the dash trying to remove the large hose from the evaporator. The entire assembly at the evaporator expansion valve assembly, including the large hose connection, is covered with an insulation glob. How do I remove the large hose without taking out the whole evaporator? There is a pair of wires leading from the evaporator leading to somewhere that I would have to disconnect. I'm in my late 60's so I hate to think how my back will feel tomorrow. Any suggestions would be appreciated. My shop manual wasn't much help in this case. My car is a '66 with factory A/C.
 

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You'll have to peel, and replace, the glob. It's purpose is to prevent condensation from forming on the metal parts.
 

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You'll have to peel, and replace, the glob. It's purpose is to prevent condensation from forming on the metal parts.
Do you know what that is made of/where it can be purchased.

But yeah, once you've peeled all that stuff off you'll see the fitting and it will be easy to replace your engine a/c hoses. I suggest you replace the expansion valve as well since you'll have access.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The last time I replaced my expansion valve was on my Ford Ranger. It was a lot easier since it was under the hood. I guess it makes sense to peal it off and replace the expansion valve. Sounds like I should completely remove the evaporator and move it to my workbench. Do you know if the 2 wires leading out of the evap. leads to a quick disconnect? There are a few clips holding it in place. I'm almost tempted to cut the wires near the evap. and then splice in quick connects.
 

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That goo is typically available at auto parts and hardware stores. If you live out in the sticks I'm sure you could order it.
 

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I've never dug into one of these things, but I know something about AC. There should be a capillary bulb attached to the evaporator suction line under all that goo. That bulb works by sensing temperature of the refrigerant leaving the evaporator. It should be tightly strapped to the outlet of the evaporator, and often they are sealed up with something like this:

Thermal Mastic, 8 Oz - AC Refrigeration Accessories - AC Refrigeration - HVACR : Grainger Industrial Supply

This is special magic goo that has excellent heat transfer properties. I only bring this up because I think it would be easy for someone to replace the expansion valve, put the bulb back on, and stick it to the pipe with a compound that has excellent INSULATING properties. That is the opposite of what you want between the bulb and the evaporator.

That's my lecture for today...you may now return to your lives, already in progress.
MrFreeze
 

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The stuff I have seen and used is in a tape form and is a butyl thermal type. Is really sticky stuff, commonly referred to as "AC sticky tape"

http://img.directindustry.com/images_di/photo-g/thermal-insulation-butyl-adhesive-tapes-418077.jpg
 

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Santech/30 ft. A/C line prestite tape (MT0450) | | AutoZone.com

There ya go. $10 for 30ft at Autozone.

I'm not sure why you would need to remove your evaporator. You can remove the expansion valve, hoses, etc from the engine bay. All you need are a couple crescent wrenches. Well, at least on my '69 you can. I just leaned over the passenger fender and the valve was against the firewall. Maybe the '66 is different.
 

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Maybe he is switching to R134 and is replacing with R134 friendly lines and expansion valve?
 

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Here is Info

I've never dug into one of these things, but I know something about AC. There should be a capillary bulb attached to the evaporator suction line under all that goo. That bulb works by sensing temperature of the refrigerant leaving the evaporator. It should be tightly strapped to the outlet of the evaporator, and often they are sealed up with something like this:

Thermal Mastic, 8 Oz - AC Refrigeration Accessories - AC Refrigeration - HVACR : Grainger Industrial Supply

This is special magic goo that has excellent heat transfer properties. I only bring this up because I think it would be easy for someone to replace the expansion valve, put the bulb back on, and stick it to the pipe with a compound that has excellent INSULATING properties. That is the opposite of what you want between the bulb and the evaporator.

That's my lecture for today...you may now return to your lives, already in progress.
MrFreeze
Yo Freeeeze!
On Mustangs, the capillary bulb you speak of is CLAMPED onto the copper pipe with a OEM COPPER CLAMP. My plan was to use the spray expanding INSULATING FOAM to finish MINE. Do you think this will be a problem?

Bryan Cobb
 

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Maybe he is switching to R134 and is replacing with R134 friendly lines and expansion valve?
He should only have to replace everything forward of the firewall, with the expansion valve being optional, but nice to do. The kits usually only come with the compressor, hoses and dryer. I did my condenser as well.

Bryan-I wouldn't use that expansion foam. That is exactly opposite what MrFreeze was saying. The tape and the stuff he listed prevent condensation. If you use the foam you'll be trapping the condensation.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
The old York has already been converted to 134A by the PO. Not sure if they followed proper procedure. The expansion valve is located at the evaporator under the dash as per my shop manual. I did realize after looking at the liquid line that I could disconnect it at the sight glass without having to work my way back to the drier. Changing the drier was a little bit of work since the front valence has to be removed. I've left the grill, valence, etc. off so that I can check for leaks after I pump it down.
 

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