Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We are upgrading the drive train on our 64.5. More ponies means more brakes. I've been offered a set of Ford Explorer brakes currently on a very low mileage 65 with an 8" as they are going much higher on their modification plans. What is the history of these brakes on fitment and reliability? We are upgrading the front suspension also but have not decided as to what we are going to use. This will be a street car and not track. Anyone else use these brakes?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,023 Posts
I assume you are talking about Explorer rear disc brakes. The 8.8" Explorer rear end into a Mustang is a common swap now. The rear brakes on a Mustang do very little work at all so there is really no practical reason to swap from drums to discs on the rear. But lots of us do it anyway. I have not heard of anybody installing the Explorer discs on an 8" rear. Everybody just installs the complete Explorer rear end after narrowing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,998 Posts
A couple issues with the Explorer rear axle. Since it came on a 4x4, the differential is offset slightly more to the right. It can cause issues with the driveshaft to tunnel in some cases. It may cause problems with the exhaust system and driveline angle operation. Make sure the axle ratio works for your use.

Many times for a perfect fit the LH axle is shortened to the same length as the RH. I was giving this swap thought but in the end cost more then what I wanted to invest
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,174 Posts
Unless you are racing, this kit from opentracker will take care of braking needs up front:


I like the manual setup, a light car like the Mustang doesn’t need power brakes. But Opentracker does offer a power kit if it’s felt to be needed.

As already mentioned, the rear end of a vintage Mustang is very light. Rear disc brakes are not needed. A drum brake hardware kit, and new brake shoes (Porterfield R4s) will positively transform the rear brake effectiveness. PS: Don’t forget to have the rear drums turned (machined) to make them perfectly round. This is very inexpensive, but often overlooked.

Z
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top