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I bought a disc brake conversion from Rod & Custom Motorsports months back. I'm currently in the process of rebuilding the front suspension/brake conversion and I'm looking at the Rotors supplied with the kit. The inner and outer wheel bearings are giving me trouble. I got the outer bearing races installed in the rotor (1 piece with integrated hub) ok, just used a rubber mallet to wack them in there. The bigger races are giving me problems though. They seem like they just quite won't fit. I called Rod & Custom and the guy wasn't very helpful. He told me either they fit or they don't and that I did have the "right" bearings (the ones they sent). He was a little annoyed because I didn't know what the bearing race was (that it was called a race... hey - this is new to me!).

Should I at least be able to get it started? I mean it's very close but I don't want to start wacking on it... Is it common to have to use a hydraulic press to insert the bearing races in the hub?

Need Help.

-Andy
 

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Most New rotors I've seen have the races installed already.. They should go in with a bit of coaxing..

AJ
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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They have to be pressed in "square". At home this means abusing a very large socket with a hammer. Not everyone has a socket this big though. They can be tapped in with a small/medium hammer. The problem is when you tap one side down, the other side jumps up. I can usually get one in by tapping gently all around it, like hitting the numbers on a clockface. 12-6-9-3-7-1-10-5 etc. Back and forth, back and forth. The key is getting the freaking thing started. If you don't have a big socket, you might be able to find something that fits across the race. Not necessarily round, but something that fits across the race so you can smack it and be hitting 6 o'clock and 12 o'clock at the same time. Then turn it so you can hit 3 and 9. Once you get it started then you can tap it the rest of the way in with a hammer and a punch.
Most times they go right in, no trouble. And sometimes....
 

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I use a seal installation tool to get the race started (saves the big sockets) and then use the procedure Gypsy described to drive them home. The seal tool can be purchased at Harbor freight for less then $10 IIRC. It is also very useful installing the grease seals with out damaging them.
 

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Put the race in your freezer for at least 30 minutes. Take a torch, or propane burner, and heat the hub. Doesn't have to be red hot, just heated up all the way around. Take your time doing this so it is warm all the way through to the inside. Shut your torch off and quick get the icy race. If it still won't go in, it's the wrong size. The contraction/expansion of metals due to cold/heat will give you that precious few thousands that you need. To start it, make sure it's square, and hold a piece of 2X4 against it. Smack the 2X4 in the center with a hammer, and it should start. Once it's started, you're almost home! ::
 

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I use an upside-down old race on top of the new race to get the new race started. Just don't drive the old race in too far or it won't come out. If you do drive it in too far you will have to drive the new race out from the back to get the old race out. I also use the "tappety-tappety-tappety" method.
 
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