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I was wondering if anyone knows roughly how far the clutch fork on either a T-10 or a toploader travels through it's full range of motion. So now that my question makes no sense /forums/images/icons/smile.gif let me try to elaborate. Image looking at the side of the bell where the clutch fork is. From that view when you press the clutch pedal in how far does the fork move from being disengaged to engaged. My z-bar is completely bent out of shape so I do not trust the accuracy of my measurements.
 

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I do not have a measurement but it is not very far. Just enough to disengage the clutch from the flywheel. Maybe you should consider getting a new Z bar or upgrade to a cable or hydraulic.
 

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When properly adjusted the back side of the fork is parallel with the rear interior side of the bell housing. Since it rests on the pivot point, it is close to touching the interior back side of the bell housing. When the fork moves forward the throwout bearing should impact the pressure plate within about 1/10" or so (not much distance between being fully engaged and fully disengaged however there must be some). The equalizer bar arms must track straight and true both on top and on bottom. To check, disconnect upper and lower pushrods, rotate the equalizer (must be a good one) and check to see if the upper arm goes parallel to the steering column. If it goes left/right over the steering column then the frame pivot needs to be adjusted. The frame pivot must be exactly across from the engine pivot fore/aft, and the engine side must be no more than 1/8" lower than the frame pivot. If this is right and the clutch is properly adjusted then you shouldn't break any more equalizer arms.
 
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