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1968 coupe, 1968 vert, 1966 coupe
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Discussion Starter #1
One of the things I’m looking to do on my next build is a distributor delete, like how modern cars don’t have a distributor like our cars did in the factory and they have ignition coils on every spark plug. So has anyone done this and have any insight or can anyone recommend any kits? For a 289!
 

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Yes, you would need the ICM (Ignition Control Module), the coil pack and a way to program the advance curve. A good start is to liberate all this from a late 90's Explorer/Mountaineer with the 5.0L. The coil pack on those was 4 dual ended (wasted spark) coils on a plate that mounted over the Cam Position Sensor and ran the spark plug wires in the traditional manner. The angle of the spark plugs in the head might not lend to the spark plug mounted coil implementation.
 
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1968 coupe, 1968 vert, 1966 coupe
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Discussion Starter #4
760706

what do you guys think of this one? Seems a bit expensive. I suppose I’m better off doing as you guys recommended and finding a parts motor
 

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View attachment 760706
what do you guys think of this one? Seems a bit expensive. I suppose I’m better off doing as you guys recommended and finding a parts motor

Why? thats probably over almost half of what you'd have in the explorer setup, but with the explorer you could have EFI and parts you can get at your local parts house.
 
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Ignition points and condenser every 5 years?... $20.

Pertronix Ignitor to drop in 20-plus years, and keep the points just in case?... $100.

Ford V8 that has run virtually flawlessly for 55 years?...Priceless.

For cool factor, I give the conversion to DIS an A+. From a cost-benefit analysis standpoint, let's just say I have a vintage Mustang without all the complicated stuff under the hood for a reason and I can spend $500 for a used motor, computer and harness or $1200 for a conversion system on something else that has a bigger WOW. If that stuff fails while I'm on a road trip, I'll probably need something with a Powerstroke and a flat bed to get home.
 

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1968 coupe, 1968 vert, 1966 coupe
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Discussion Starter #7
Ignition points and condenser every 5 years?... $20.

Pertronix Ignitor to drop in 20-plus years, and keep the points just in case?... $100.

Ford V8 that has run virtually flawlessly for 55 years?...Priceless.

For cool factor, I give the conversion to DIS an A+. From a cost-benefit analysis standpoint, let's just say I have a vintage Mustang without all the complicated stuff under the hood for a reason and I can spend $500 for a used motor, computer and harness or $1200 for a conversion system on something else that has a bigger WOW. If that stuff fails while I'm on a road trip, I'll probably need something with a Powerstroke and a flat bed to get home.
I'm usually one for all original but on my 3rd mustang build i wanna go all out and do some crazy mods and build a sweet reliable ride with all modern amenities but the same classic look of our cars.
 

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1968 coupe, 1968 vert, 1966 coupe
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Discussion Starter #9
Here's a better idea. Sell your classic and buy a 2020 Mustang. All problems solved.
What’s the fun in that! Its my third 60s mustang build and the 3rd in the “stable” The other two I have I built stock I suppose it’s more of just a hobby to build a car like this as opposed to a 2020 mustang where you just drive it around what’s the fun in that! I have these cars because I love to work on them!
 

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I don't see how replacing the distributor and coil really gets you modern amenities since it is easy to get low maintenance components with the distributor/coil combination. I would think one would focus more on a smooth running engine that always fires right up, excellent handling car that stops great, then inside the modern features like nice gauges, good climate control, low noise, nice seats and carpet, etc. And perhaps power windows. I don't see how focusing on the distributor fits in to the experience of driving the finished car.

Now for myself, what I love about my '68 is that it is a simple car. I love that I can drive Interstate speeds with the window down in comfort without being assaulted by the wind. So while I could appreciate an up to date classic that someone else has created, I don't need one myself.
 

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1965 2+2 Vintage Burgundy A-code C4
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I have a “new” ‘98 Explorer motor with all that stuff on it on an engine stand. Not sure what shape it’s in after 22 years, but it’s never been fired, except on the Cleveland dyno.
 
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What’s the fun in that! Its my third 60s mustang build and the 3rd in the “stable” The other two I have I built stock I suppose it’s more of just a hobby to build a car like this as opposed to a 2020 mustang where you just drive it around what’s the fun in that! I have these cars because I love to work on them!
By the time you do this, the EFI and then start buying parts for an engine, you're half of the way to the cost of a Coyote swap.
 
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modern ? you mean more complicated and more stuff to fail. and harder to troubleshoot if something goes wrong. my suggestion would be to buy a new mustang
 
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