Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Gone but never forgetten
Joined
·
25,239 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The stock distributor had 2 springs ... 1 big, 1 small. My re-curve springs are even smaller. I know it's just a matter of getting the right combination of springs, but say I end up using the original small spring, and one of the new "tiny" springs. Does it make any difference wich reluctor arm the bigger spring goes on?

Put a different way, once I've decided on spring pair, would I get the same effect using the same 2 springs, but swapped on the reluctor arms?

If you always do what you've always done,
You'll always get what you've always got

http://www.classic-mustang.net/johnpro
http://www.classic-mustang.net/john66/mustang/pics/66fsides2.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,070 Posts
It has lots of useful re-curve info
http://www.fordmuscle.com/archives/2000/03/timing/index.shtml

'59 T-Bird..[color:blue]'70 Mustang Convert</font color=blue>...[color:green]'72 Mach One</font color=green>
http://clubs.hemmings.com/baymustang/t-bird.jpg
The Black Bird At 42,she's the oldest in my Ford stable
 

·
Gone but never forgetten
Joined
·
25,239 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That article is great ... but it's vague in the area of my question. It just says to replace the springs, but doesn't mention which arm the springs should go on, if using 2 different sized springs.

I'm still getting my advance totally in just a little too fast, and wondered if swapping the location of the springs I've gone with will have any effect.

If you always do what you've always done,
You'll always get what you've always got

http://www.classic-mustang.net/johnpro
http://www.classic-mustang.net/john66/mustang/pics/66fsides2.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,782 Posts
It depends on whether your distributor is right or left armed. Hehehe

Honestly, I don't believe it matters which side the weak spring goes.

Post your results. I am currently running 14 degrees of initial advance and it runs up to about 38 total (marks stop at 30, so I am eyeballing it). When the car comes back from the bodyshop, I will look into the timing more.



Steve Leslie, 65 coupe in restoration. 302, toploader, A/C, disc brakes, bench seat

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1571478&a=12409371&p=45514468.jpg
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
You might try finding a shop that has a distributor machine. I had a shop set up a custom distributor curve on a 76/390 c.i. truck motor. The stock distributor had very stiff springs to limit the mechanical advance to just about 0 to keep detonation from being a problem. That works fine but you also lose performance. Depending on your compression ratio, how much lift and duration your cam has will determine the advance curve. Ideally you want the engine as close to detonating as possible without detonating for maximum performance. My .02.

Jon Sherar
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top