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Discussion Starter #1
I was asked to share my powder coating oven, I don't have a lot of pictures because I didn't plan on writing it up.

First you can use a normal household oven for powder coating but afterwards you can not cook in it again. If you look on craigslist you can probably get one for free.

I decided that I wanted to powder coat my rear bumper (about 5 ft long) the local powder coating guys wanted $400.00. Noe asking to make it myself.

First I found 2 ovens, from the oven I used...
4 heating elements
4 racks
1 temp sensor
1 digital controller
All of the insulation
A door handle
The electrical cord and connection junction where the cord connects

Things I got for free locally
2 metal desk
2 oven's
2 metal shelf units
4 casters
Lap top power supply

Things I bought
1.5 square tube stock about 30 ft (metal shop)
22 gauge sheet metal 3 4x8 sheets (metal shop)
2 sheets of tempered glass (IKEA had these for 5 dollars each)
Hinges (home depot)
Latches (Amazon)
Handle (home depot)
Controller box (home depot)
Electrical junction boxes and tubing (home depot)
Lights and fixtures (home depot)
Two solid state relays (amazon)
High temp silicone (autozone)
Rivers (Amazon)
Self tapping screws (Amazon)
 

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To start I need to work out the design. I used sheet metal for the base. I bent up the three bottom the look like a box top and the did the same for the sides. Each piece has to have a double fold to be able to put in insulation and then convert it in sheet metal.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I then riveted the outside panels together. I left them hollow so that I could run the electrical through them. I had the basic oven built and then decided I needed to figure out the math for my amp draw. I decided that I wanted to run the elements in parallel not series so that all four elements would get a full 220 volt. To do this you need to do a ohm's test on each element and follow ohms law. Volts 220 devided by ohms of resistance will give you amps. I bought 2 60 amp sold state relays from Amazon. I know this is overkill but I'm ok with that.
 

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I did one out of steel studs fiberglass insulation and sheet aluminum from an old box trailer. A fan and a couple oven elements like you did. Sold it 15 years ago and now I need one again so will have to build one at some point IF I can find somewhere to store it... Might make it in panels so I can just bolt it together and take it apart.

Those solid state relays are the way to go however most of the import ones can't handle the amps they are rated for. Most are 30 amp or so and sold as whatever sticker they want to put on the outside...

There are commercial temp controllers that are pretty nice and quite cheap (under $20) but most of them are for temps under 220ish.
 

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Thank you krynn44! That was tons more than I expected. I've considered using steel studs and rock wool insulation. I haven't sourced a controller or relays.

Quick question: were the 2 metal desks used in your build?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The desk where from a old school desk setup. I'll post the rest of my pictures. Is there a way to select more than one picture at a time?
 

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Nice job OP.

For you guys that are looking ebay can have deals on industrial quality, name brand SSRs. I got four used Crydom 50 amp 240v cheap, like $20 for the lot. I used one for my solder reflow oven and kept the other three for building a larger powder coat oven and other projects.

If you want make a DIY controller it's pretty cheap and easy with an Arduino (or even a PIC). You need a thermistor and driver with the code to make it run. Using the code you can program you PID curve/duration to be whatever you want. I did that for the reflow oven. If that's not your bag you can get pre made PID controllers for $50-60 and roll your own. Or if you already have an oven gut the controller from that.
 

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That oven could double as a load cell to annually test a generator for your house! Great job!
 
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