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Discussion Starter #1
I stood in the garage for about 20 min this morning looking at my 67 and thinking about the rabbit hole.

Everything is out of the engine bay.

I need some rust repair on the cowl, apron near the battery and lower core support. The e-brake brackets are missing from under the floorpan.

I can neutralize the rust on the apron and core support so it doesnt get any worse. With the battery and radiator installed you cant see it, but I know it is there.

The cowl either needs to be repaired or I will need to carry the vent covers in case I get caught in the rain. I need a e-brake.

My SIL thinks we should buy a 115v mig welder and do these repairs ourselves. Neither of us has ever welded, but he is pretty sharp and with a bit of practice on scrap sheet metal Im confident he will catch on pretty quick and be able to do a decent job. I think a 115v welder is fine for sheet metal, at least thats what I gather from the web.

So do I push back getting the car on the road another month and attempt these repairs or do I not go any deeper down the rabbit hole?

I still have plenty to do. The 250 shortblock will have to be disassembled, plastic-gauged, assembly lubed, I have a new cam, the head hasnt gone to the shop yet, he is backed up a couple weeks, the dampner isnt back, I havent even looked at the tranny.

Im a quasi-perfectionist and I hate to start a job and not do it right.
 

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I have had two cars that needed minor attention in the same areas and one that is going to be a bit of a booger.
 

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Had the same issues in my car. Sometimes you can cut patches to fix the metal without too much work. Really depends on how bad the damage is. If the metal is pitted / corroded, I’d replace the metal one way or another. If no holes or bad pitting neutralize it, paint it and keep on moving.

I was lucky enough to come across a NOS ford rad core support for $100 at a swap meet so this convinced me to do the full R&R. It wasn’t really that big of a job. Lot of measuring and test fitting but pretty straight forward on the welding...meaning easy to get to.
 

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Nothing wrong with a 120 volt MIG welder. You can weld up to about 1/4". You just have to me mindful of the circuit length and extension cords as they are more subjective to voltage drop.
 

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Hmm, its a little like the rabbit hole slippery slope car project creep....its not just the welder..you need a helmet, gloves, gas bottle, pliers, a cart etc.. well, maybe just a helmet and gas......but heck, you know you and the SIL want it...scour craigs list and you might find a set up on there...get a 110 unit to start, then you can always resell it if things don't work out!
 

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Find a good used welder if you can. You”ll find 1000 uses for it. The battery box is easy. The cowl is a big job but not too hard. Wait on it until you have practiced on other areas like the battery box. You’ll never regret doing it right te first time. You‘ll likely regret cutting corners...
 

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I have a Harbor Freight wire feed welder. It's 120 volt, 20 amp and works great on sheet metal up to 1/4 inch (it comes with a cheapie face shield too).
 

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Just a suggestion to neutralize the acid before you neutralize the rust. I had same situation one time and thought I had gotten it taken care of. I used rust neutralizer in several spots and all did great accept one: the area below the battery. I continued to rust through until I wire wheeled it down then scrubbed with paste of baking soda then reapplied the neutralizer. It did fine then until I got around to cutting it all out and replacing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I used Ospho for many years in a marine environment. I've got it figured out. There are better products. But not for $20 a gallon.
 
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120V welder will be fine, make sure it is not flux core only. Flux core splatters a lot, welds hotter and requires more cleaning/grinding afterwards.
 

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Yep, gas shielded is best. Makes it easy.
 

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Protect your windshield! I ruined mine with spatter welding in the engine bay, never thought of the spatter burning in.
 

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Hardly anybody drives these cars in the rain anyways. I'd buy a cowl cover and keep it handy but I wouldn't replace the cowl given your description. I've fixed about a half dozen cowls on these cars and it is a serious job. You're looking at probably a hundred plus welds - oh and you don't have to worry about the windshield because you'll be removing it anyway. My advice presumes that you don't have any other bad areas on the car. If I were doing a bunch of metal work - quarters, floor pans, etc then I would go ahead and replace the cowl since you're already tearing the car down. Also consider how much free time you have - with kids, job, home projects, etc I only get a few hours every week to work on my car. If I were retired then I'd have more freedom in what I chose to restore. As always turning a restoration into a multi-year project can really drain your enthusiasm.

david
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Working on the cars, yard and house is my job. Kids grown, wife still works, Ive got plenty of time.
 
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