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I also applaud your ingenuity. And I also believe that you either have the wrong sway-bar or wrong LCA (if that’s possible). In my ’68 big block, lowered about an inch with GW arms, the bolt connecting the sway-bar is almost perfectly vertical. Remember that the force in your design will be directly vectored between the bolts, so it will push/pull as much to the side as it does up/down.
 

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Redneckgearhead, I beg to differ. Look under any modern car and you will see a double jointed link connecting the sway bar to a suspension arm/component. What baffles me is that OEM’s use the links in single shear...
Yes, when your link is perpendicular it would act as intended. The problem is that typically end links are much longer than what you have fabricated, thus the change in angle from perpendicular of a stock link is much less per inch of vertical travel.

To others, while being near perpendicular is important to transfer load, a rigid connection is not. Try this, take a pencil and put it perpendicular between your hand and desk. Push down a bit. It hurts as you are transferring load, but neither end is fixed to your hand or desk...it is basically a hinge connection at both ends. Now move your hand to take the pencil out of perpendicular. The pencil will slide out as some of the force is changed from going up/down to sideways.

As far as single shear goes, there is ample strength so no need to go double. I think the slenderness of a stock link would bend under compression before it would ever shear.
 

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I can't be the only one with a gross misalignment of the sway bar end and lower control arm... how do I fix that (without ruining my caster setting)?
You can also achieve positive castor by shimming the front bolt of the UCA and removing shims from the rear bolt. In an ideal world this is preferred because it keeps the LCA perpendicular to the frame rails and the wheel centered in the wheel arch. Keeping the LCA perpendicular both sides and using shims on the UCA ensures equal geometry both sides (or as close as you're likely to get on a Mustang). It'll also mitigate the issue your'e seeing with the sway bar hole miles away from the eye in the bar.

I like to make large caster changes with the UCA, then tweak our adjustable strut rods for the final small changes.
 

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You could always built an extension from the sway bar mount on the lower arm, back to where your end link would be straight. Be sure and gusset the extension and be aware of wheel and tire clearance.

I once built a similar end link design, but used 1/8" thick steel for the links. This was on a Fox body and it didn't have the alignment issure yours has.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Shaun, the scary part is I have already shimmed up the UCA to get more caster. I remember having to be careful though because adding too many shims to the UCA ruined the ability to dial in negative camber because I would run out of adjustment on the LCA cam. There is no doubt we are asking a lot from these old cars... but that's what makes it fun! ;)

J Persons, I thought about that too, but I didn't want to go down the rabbit hole of modifying the LCA, but believe me, it crossed my mind.

I went ahead and purchased a new sway bar for a 67 Mustang, cause at this point, the one I have should fit better than it does. Hopefully it arrives in the next few days, I can slap it in there, and then everything lines up correctly.

I did drive the Mustang to work this morning with the new links installed. The front suspension seems more compliant and quieter, like I got rid of a severe bind in the suspension, but it does sway a touch more, which is to be expected with the misaligned links pushing on the sway bar sideways.

Its funny how a simple project turned into a giant cluster in such short order! Plus the fact that I have been using a totally ill fitting part all these years without knowing that it was probably causing other issues (that I didn't know were issues until now). Hopefully when the new sway bar arrives and gets installed everything will line up perfectly and I will be on my way... hopefully!
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Ok, the new sway bar arrived today (1-1/8” diameter made by Eibach). I unpackaged the new one, crawled under the car and removed the existing one... and when I place the new on top of the existing they looked damn near identical where they connected to the frame and end links. Installed the new one on the car and sure enough, not any better (it might be slightly better but it’s still way off). :(

I snugged the stock type end links on the LCA with the weight of the car on the front suspension and the end link is about 5/8” too far forward and 1” too far to the outside of the sway bar end link hole. I am at a loss as to what is causing this. I am contemplating just drilling a hole in the LCA in a spot that allows the end link to connect straight up and down. Both sides have the same issue, so at least it’s consistent!
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Who is selling the Eibach?
 

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Direct from Eibach is a very good price with free shipping.
 

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Yep, that's a "solution" engineered to fail. A much more practical, and simpler solution, would be to reposition the lower sway bar mounting point directly below the bar's mounting point and go back to the straight link and bushing set-up.
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Discussion Starter #34
Quick update...

I finally caved and ended up on drilling a new hole in the LCA for the end links. I couldn't get the new hole directly underneath the sway bar because of clearance issues with the side and boxed in portion of the LCA, but its WAY better. I installed my wobbly links with the new 1 1/8" diameter bar and on my drive into work this morning, holy cow, talk about flat cornering! The suspension is still very compliant since I got rid of the binding and misalignment issues with the old links, but it stays so flat in corners now I don't feel the need to lean my body in turns anymore. Granted, the new sway bar rate is ~789 lbs/in whereas my old one was around 257 lbs/in (these are calculated values), so that definitely has something to do with it.

I'll drive the car around for a bit to make sure everything stays put, but I'm excited to do my next track day now
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My front end alignment has a significant amount of caster and that tends to make the sway bar to lower control arm connection very ****eyed, leaving large gaps when the end link bushings are snugged down.
I think you need to revisit your original problem, the caster. I have a feeling you are masking that issue with your fixes. You know the sway bar isn't the issue. That leaves the LCA being in the wrong place (bent or adjusted incorrectly).

Or your whole frame is crooked.

But something isn't right and drilling holes isn't a fix.
 

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I've seen the double bearing OEM end links like on Hondas and such but I still believe I would be happier with the design if one end were a stud bolted through bushings like stock. (Poly bushings) I feel like that would be enough to rid the tendency of the assembly to "fold" up.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I've seen the double bearing OEM end links like on Hondas and such but I still believe I would be happier with the design if one end were a stud bolted through bushings like stock. (Poly bushings) I feel like that would be enough to rid the tendency of the assembly to "fold" up.
That is my entire reason for doing this; to get rid of the bushings! The stock bushing setup is emulating a spherical bearing, at both connection points. The problem I have with the OEM setup is that those bushings have two jobs to do: they need to allow the link to pivot freely with suspension movement AND they need to provide a solid link between the LCA and the sway bar. With the bushings, you need to make sacrifices to allow it to do both jobs. You can crank down on that end link nut squishing the bushings to have a nice solid and slop free connection, but then when the suspension moves the bushings don’t give and they bind up, effectively stiffening suspension movement. If you loosen the nut to allow free movement of the end link then you create slop that needs to be taken up with suspension/bar movement before the sway bar can do its job. Any slop in the sway bar system will effectively decrease your sway bar spring rate making it feel like you have a smaller diameter sway bar. Using spherical bearings allows free movement AND a solid link.

For the assembly to fold up, the misalignment would have to be severe (like my first attempt and set of pictures 😬) and the sway bar would have to be floppy (like a stock diameter bar). If the OEM setup is misaligned it won‘t fold up like the double bearing design, it would just squish the bushings and fold over and then pop back up when pulled the other direction. Any misalignment in either link will ruin the effectiveness of the sway bar to do its job.

If something goes haywire with my latest setup I will definitely post about it. I started this post to run it by another set of eyes to find any issues, and we most definitely found issues! I appreciate the constructive input and discussion from everyone and I think these forums allow everyone to learn something. I hope for the same on future projects!
 

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It seems you've traded any binding by the stock set up for the swivel of the joints, negating the purpose of the sway bar.
While I do not see the need or benefit of the hinged connection, it will work to transfer a vertical load as long as it is perpendicular to the sway bar and LCA as it is shown now. As it moves away from perpendicular it will start to transfer a portion of the load sideways. A stock sway bar link is basically a hinged connection as the holes on each end are oversized and the only thing keeping the bolt from flopping around are the rubber/urethane bushings.
 
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