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soooo... Pertronix cam gear question. Looked on Jegs. Says iron gear. Looked on Summit racing. Says steel gear. I have a non billet roller cam. Why the heck they can't list it right? I would assume it is good with a roller cam but for $300 for the dizzy and coil I think I want to get it right. Heat treated cast iron?
 

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There is a lot of confusion on this. I was equally confused when I put a GT40P with a Mustang 5.0 cam. You keep reading use a Melonized one place and a steel gear elsewhere for the same cam. So I spent some time looking into this calling Ford Motorsport, MSD and Howards Cams plus what ever I could find on the internet. On several calls to Howards to see if I got the same answer each time, I did. What Howards told me. All the cam companies are buying their cam cores from the same 3 manufacturers. They are what's called "SADI" which means Selectively hardened Austemptered Ductile Iron. The cam cores are cast ductile iron where only the lobes are hardened. Howards said to me as well as reading a article on line by Howards that SADI cams can use a simple cast iron distributor gear. The same used on a flat tappet. Crane says the same on the internet. Ford factory cams are 5150 billet steel. On the 5150 billet you need either e steel or a Melonied gear which is ductile iron with a hardening operation. One of the articles I read by MSD said Melonized distributor gears are typically used as they are compatible with cast iron, SADI and 5150 billet cams. It's the typical default distributor gear.

My un official statement is if you have a SADI cam, you should be fine with either a simple cast iron or Melonized gear but definitely not a steel gear. IMO, one of the most important things is to have the distributor gear properly and accurately locate the gear! The final say what gear to use on your cam should be the manufacturer of your cam.
 

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There is a lot of confusion on this. I was equally confused when I put a GT40P with a Mustang 5.0 cam. You keep reading use a Melonized one place and a steel gear elsewhere for the same cam. So I spent some time looking into this calling Ford Motorsport, MSD and Howards Cams plus what ever I could find on the internet. On several calls to Howards to see if I got the same answer each time, I did. What Howards told me. All the cam companies are buying their cam cores from the same 3 manufacturers. They are what's called "SADI" which means Selectively hardened Austemptered Ductile Iron. The cam cores are cast ductile iron where only the lobes are hardened. Howards said to me as well as reading a article on line by Howards that SADI cams can use a simple cast iron distributor gear. The same used on a flat tappet. Crane says the same on the internet. Ford factory cams are 5150 billet steel. On the 5150 billet you need either e steel or a Melonied gear which is ductile iron with a hardening operation. One of the articles I read by MSD said Melonized distributor gears are typically used as they are compatible with cast iron, SADI and 5150 billet cams. It's the typical default distributor gear.

My un official statement is if you have a SADI cam, you should be fine with either a simple cast iron or Melonized gear but definitely not a steel gear. IMO, one of the most important things is to have the distributor gear properly and accurately locate the gear! The final say what gear to use on your cam should be the manufacturer of your cam.
Thanks. I thought the pertronix came with the proper gear but I wouldn't buy a distributor new if it didn't work with cam. That would be like paying $ and then fixing it to work.
 

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That would be like paying $ and then fixing it to work.
You must not have purchased too many aftermarket parts for your car yet :).
I purchased a Pertronix distributor to use on a flat tappet cam, that came with a steel. Called Pertronix to verify, they replied they haven't seen a problem using on cast iron cams. Wasn't convinced, called Comp Cams and was told no, it will ruin your cam. Did an online chat with Comp and was told steel was fine, so what's a guy to believe.
I knew for sure a cast iron gear is compatible. Who wants to replace a cam, liters along with a new gear because you didn't want to spend an extra $25 and roll the dice?
As Huskinhano stated, you can't just pin a new gear in the same hole as the old gear as they don't end in the exact location on the shaft. I believe the MSD cast iron gear came with the measurement, but the Ford factory manual has it also.
 

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3 years years ago I was installing a roller cam (Lunati) and petronix plug n play dist on a 302 and I asked them what gear they use as I was getting conflicting info. This is what they said
All PerTronix distributor come with a harden steel gear. So, distributor part number: D130700 will work for your set up. If you wanted the matching coil please use part number: 45011..

I know some dealer have it listed differently. But we have only ever sold these distributors with harden steel gears.
 

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soooo... Pertronix cam gear question. Looked on Jegs. Says iron gear. Looked on Summit racing. Says steel gear. I have a non billet roller cam. Why the heck they can't list it right? I would assume it is good with a roller cam but for $300 for the dizzy and coil I think I want to get it right. Heat treated cast iron?
Melonizing is a chemical process, aka "molten salt bath ferritic nitrocarburizing".

One question I have is why spend $300 on a distributor when a $50 distributor, $20 gear, $30 module and $22 of wiring will do just as good a job.....
 

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Melonizing is a chemical process, aka "molten salt bath ferritic nitrocarburizing".

One question I have is why spend $300 on a distributor when a $50 distributor, $20 gear, $30 module and $22 of wiring will do just as good a job.....
Built in rev limiter is a nice feature with simple clean wiring.
 

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My question is: how much pressure is being applied between the cam gear and distributor gear? If the distributor stops turning and cam continues, then there is a serious problem with the distributor or oil pump. The amount of wear between the 2 gears would be minimal unless there wasn't any oil in the engine. Just wondering.
 
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