Vintage Mustang Forums banner
41 - 60 of 99 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
I stopped at an Autozone tonight. I needed an oil filter and paint for my 331 stroker. They didn't have a reference guide over by the filters, and I didn't know which models would fit, so of course I asked.

And of course, they needed to know make model year. It's always mighty confusing for these poor parts people to explain that it's a 331 stroker going in a '67 Cougar. They don't have an entry for that. So as usual, I just tell them the model year for the part that matters here: I said '89 Mustang V8 5.0 HO'. That's not hard, right?

But apparently that was confusing. Blank looks. "What engine? What car?"

"It's a Ford V8. '89."

More confused looks.

"A Windsor?"

The elderly lady working, and 20something kid standing there both chorused, "What's a Windsor?"

I could not help myself. I was absolutely stupefied. How can you work in a parts store, and not know what a Windsor is? I suspect if I'd said "LS" or "Small Block Chevy" they'd have been just as lost. It was like walking into a McDonalds and asking for a cheeseburger, and having them ask what I was talking about. I didn't know what to say!

I just took a step back, and said, "No worries. It's okay, guys. I'll get this someplace else." I was chuckling to myself as I left. I hope I did not come across as a jerk. I certainly didn't act mean, and I did thank them as I left. I almost went back into the store to explain, but then I thought, "If they don't know what a Ford V8 is, I don't have enough time to explain what a Windsor is." They only know how to type what you say into a window on the screen, and have no desire to understand what they are selling, or why they sell it, I guess.

Is the information I carry around in my head about these cars (and many others!) that esoteric?
[/QU

Try asking for a distributor wrench!
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Grimbrand

·
Registered
1970 Sportroof Mustang Grabber Value Package
Joined
·
1,668 Posts
We are in the age of computer science & social justice as electives in school instead of auto mechanics, basic electricity and welding. On top of that many youngins only play video games instead of pulling wrenches on a Cars, lawn mowers or mini-bikes after school. Jus my .02.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,350 Posts
That why I’m not a cashier.🤣

Back in early 90’s, I learned that I had to simplify and know what I had to make the process easier for both of us at the store.

65 Mustang with…78 Granada front brakes, 65 Mustang rear brakes, 78 distributor/cap/wires, 65 power steering, Aftermarket ignition system.

Two summers ago while in Austin, I had to make an emergency EGR coolant line repair….there was no way I was going to explain to the young person that it was for a 92 EFI 5.0L in a 65 Mustang.

It took me longer to “guide” and help look for part than it did to make my repair.

I also keep in mind if it’s a Ford, Dodge, and older Jeeps. chances are that it will have to be ordered….Chevy & Honda are on the shelf…still the same today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
I have a 1930 Model A Ford, that I bought in 1969. It was less than 40 years old when I bought it. This was a LOT newer (back then) than our Gen 1 Mustangs.

I found when I went to the parts store in 1969 through the 1970's, people that were born in the 1950's and late 1940's, were so INCREDIBLY STUPID on Model A parts that probably none of them lived to see 40 years old.

It was SO DEPRESSING these people did not have a CLUE about a car, where almost 5 million were made and many were still on the road. All they could do was flip pages back and forth in their giant books behind the counter.
LOL. I was JUST going to make a comment exactly like this.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,492 Posts
FL1 is the long one and if you need it shorter use a FL300.
Any one know why the pricee nearly tripled this year.?
And they are never on the shelf at walmart.


ken
Yeah I started a thread earlier in the year about the FL-1A getting harder to find, more expensive, sometimes counterfeited. The auto parts stores wanted twice as much as Wallet-Mart and the Ford dealer was out. I went to another WM, found 4 and bought 3. I left one for the next guy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,108 Posts
That why I’m not a cashier.🤣

Back in early 90’s, I learned that I had to simplify and know what I had to make the process easier for both of us at the store.

65 Mustang with…78 Granada front brakes, 65 Mustang rear brakes, 78 distributor/cap/wires, 65 power steering, Aftermarket ignition system.

Two summers ago while in Austin, I had to make an emergency EGR coolant line repair….there was no way I was going to explain to the young person that it was for a 92 EFI 5.0L in a 65 Mustang.

It took me longer to “guide” and help look for part than it did to make my repair.

I also keep in mind if it’s a Ford, Dodge, and older Jeeps. chances are that it will have to be ordered….Chevy & Honda are on the shelf…still the same today.
I plugged the egr port in the manifold on the GT40P in my fox and eliminated the coolant lines


ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,626 Posts
Dropping over $2-3K+ monthly on parts, I go to Orielly’s only. There are several guys and gals working there- most I’ll deal with, a few I won’t. They all know me by name, know what brands I prefer, and have no problem if I walk behind the counter to get what I need. Had exactly this conversation with the store manager just 2 days ago. He said exactly what you fellow gear heads are thinking…. Todays applicants have no idea about cars, no desire to learn, want the PC to do all the work, get their check and go home exactly at end of shift. No coming early, no staying late, no extra effort unless graciously compensated. He said they flat out can’t and won’t afford the intelligent apps, but prefer to roll through ignorance until they luck into a go getter that doesn’t know any better. And no- I will not ever set foot in an Autozone or Advance Auto.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,888 Posts
This knowledge is one of the curses of getting older. One becomes knowledgeable about so many things that more and more people around them seem stupid. I'm there and I'm not even an expert yet!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I try to go to those places with part numbers for what I need, if I can. It can be tricky with part numbers too.

Some places still want a make, model and year. Sometimes the part numbers are not for my car, that really confuses them.

I don’t go to those places much, except for things I can get off the shelf. Our local NAPA also has a machine/speed shop. Plenty of carburetor parts, gaskets high octane fuel, I am lucky to have them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,354 Posts
A lot of knowledge has shifted to the internet. Usually, my questions are very specific so only the net will have the answers. And then I’ll usually order online but for other things, I’ll try and pick up at the store but only when I know what I need.

As for losing interest in classics, I don’t think that’s as much a thing but it’s not an easy hobby to get into either. Cars are expensive, parts are expensive, gas is expensive, insurance is expensive, plus you need another car for daily driving, a garage, etc. Additionally, you have to want to invest the time into them. The cost of entry isn’t cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
Your first problem is it’s Autozone.

Second, there are a bazillion combinations of engines and makes and models and it’s pretty unreasonable to expect them to know all of that, especially an engine that’s 20 years obsolete.

I don’t intend this to be insulting or offensive to you, but what you did was an arrogant dick move and a missed opportunity. They’re just trying to put food on their table. A 30 second investment of your time and they’d have known what a Windsor was for the next guy. I think you are doing a good thing by going back there to explain.

The next good thing you can do is not go to an Autozone. ;) Napa’s or Oreilly’s tend to have guys that know their way around a car.
I didn’t read that he was exactly a dick about it, but I do get the point about knowing what you need before you go in. Part of it is just knowing a model and year to be able to give them if you happen upon a keyboard puncher. My block is from a 76 Maverick, so, I have that on cheat sheet in my glove box in case I ever need to ask the parts counter for something touching it.

To @Grimbrand ‘s point, though, the keyboard punchers can be frustrating, and I’ve played the “nevermind, I’ll go to NAPA” card before. Two instances come to mind, one when I was looking for distributor cam lube, and one when I was looking for gear pattern compound. In both cases, they asked me for a make and model that it would be used on.

Even if the employees aren’t particularly knowledgeable, and only had a baseline level of knowledge of the things in their store, they would be able to tell you if they had distributor cam lube. It’s like going in and asking for fuel injector cleaner and then asking for a make, model and year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,807 Posts
If you really want to get "that look", go in and ask for points for a dual point distributor in a 1965 Mustang (ran one for years). Almost every time I would get two sets of points for a single point distributor. Now when I go in to get something I need, I'll look it up online first and go in with the part number.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,807 Posts
When I was 17, I bought my first car, a 1965 Chevy Biscayne. After owning it for a couple of months, one of the front wheel bearings burned up and badly scored the spindle in the process. I went to a local junk yard and told the guy behind the counter what I needed. He looked at me (at 17, I probably looked like a 14 year old), and asked if I had ever taken one off before. I told him no, so he had me follow him out back where the cars were, found a 65 Chevy, and then proceeded to show me step by step on how to remove the spindle. He asked if I had a pickle fork, which I didn't, so he demonstrated on how to shock the joints apart with a hammer. It was a lesson I've used several times in my life! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,809 Posts
A lot of knowledge has shifted to the internet. Usually, my questions are very specific so only the net will have the answers. And then I’ll usually order online but for other things, I’ll try and pick up at the store but only when I know what I need.

As for losing interest in classics, I don’t think that’s as much a thing but it’s not an easy hobby to get into either. Cars are expensive, parts are expensive, gas is expensive, insurance is expensive, plus you need another car for daily driving, a garage, etc. Additionally, you have to want to invest the time into them. The cost of entry isn’t cheap.
Kind of makes me sad for them . They won't ever know the joy of laying in the dirt ,in the cold with some gas or trans fluid running down their neck or in their eyes .
Let alone the joy of when a socket or wrench slips off a nut & you really need a couple of stitches because you split some knuckles open but just don't have time to waste on getting them .

Poor dumb little babys don't know what they are missing .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
My 86 plow truck had alternator mounted low- had to lay on your back to change it, and all the road slop got to it. I bought an Advanced Auto lifetime guarantee. During my annual trip for new one, kid behind the counter says it needs to be tested first, and call the manager. Manager comes out, looks at me and tells the kid to go get me another. When he protested that he was told needs to be tested, no exceptions, Mike says "Charlie, when he gets back, would you show him how to use test machine"

My problem is you can't find a FL1A. Every manufacturer has changed their number three times. And my last trip in, asking for FL1A, had to have manager show counter person how to use interchange instead of computer look up.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Grimbrand

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
I see both sides of the argument. I actually worked at an O'Reillys when I first left active duty and was in school, my GI Bill was more than I made full-time as a night manager and that's the OLD GI Bill. I guess that could only hire ASE mechanics and hot rod builders, but imagine the increase in salaries and guess who's going to pay for that when they buy their parts!

But also, why try and confuse them? Why even say it's a 331 stroker, that has nothing to do with it!?! That has nothing to do w/ the filter.... it's still a 302 block! And w/ hot rods? Forget about it! I wouldn't go in asking for a cap n' rotor for an HEI in SBF Windor... I'd go in and ask for the part using the GM model as a reference and then say, "It's for an HEI in my Mustang."

You can't expect them to know all the OEM parts for ALL manufacturers for ALL models, can you?!? PLUS hot rod applications? If they knew that they probably wouldn't be working at a parts store! Pull your own part #s if you're going to build something even remotely out of the norm IMO (hell, I pull my own on my DDs/late models too).

Maybe by time those kids are YOUR age they'll have the same knowledge-base, jus' sayin'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I sold my 68 Failane about 10 or 12 years ago. Five years later, I get a call from the owner of local auto repair shop, saying none of the parts stores have a listing for a Duraspark module in 68.
And he is local shop all the hot Rodgers go to. Said he couldn't believe wiring job- it looked factory.
 
41 - 60 of 99 Posts
Top