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I plan on rebuilding my suspension all the way around soon. All the master kits I see in the catalogs include upper and lower control arms. However this seems to drive the price up and I am wondering if I even need to install new control arms? If not, can I get these kits anywhere that don't include them? TIA
 
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I just got done with my daughters 66 coupe .I think from that little project that i would surely go with the new upper and lower control arms ! I did and i am very pleased with the end results. what a differance !! It doesnt add that much to the job realy to do it all . i got my master rebuild kit from laurel mountain and was pleased with there service and quality !
 

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I do know that lower control arms are available as a complete unit only. Apparently due to wear issues, they do not sell only the lower control arm ball joint like they do the upper one.
 

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I inspected my upper control arms on my 65 coupe and they seem straight, a prerequisite. My uppers also have the bolt on ball joints. I can save close to $100 on the suspension kit by re-using my uppers and re-building them. They should not be terribly difficult with a little time. Plus we have a big vise and serious tools to remove/replace the pivot shaft and bushing. I'll use the $100 elsewhere on the project. If I had extra money though, I'd replace the uppers rather than rebuild them though. Lowers come as a complete unit. I'm getting my stuff from Laurel Mtn. Mustang. Good Luck.
 
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I would replace everything. This is a safty issue more than anything.

Good Luck!
 

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I would rebuild the uppers. The originals arms are of superior quality than the repros. Also to make them last longer see MustangSteve's advice:

Upper A-Frame Bushing Rebuild
When you remove the 3/4" nuts from inside the engine compartment, retrieve the alignment bushings from each of the 4 bolts (under the fender). Keep track of which ones went where and then put them back in their original locations when you reassemble. Tighten the 3/4" nuts very tight and they won't come loose. The real challenge is getting the new bushings screwed into place with the shaft centered exactly between the bushings and also not putting the bushings in a real tight bind by torqueing the large threaded bushing into the a-frame until it feels tight. The bushings will likely NOT tighten up in the a-frame without bending the sides of the a-frame towards each other. I tighten them until they are all the way in, but not necessarily tight. Then tack-weld every other flat on the hex of the bushing to the a-frame to keep them from backing out. IF YOU DON’T DO THAT, THE BUSHINGS WILL EITHER WEAR VERY RAPIDLY OR THE BUSHINGS WILL UNSCREW FROM THE ARM. (That is not a good thing). Before putting the bushings onto the shaft, take a die grinder with a 1/16" wide cutoff wheel and cut a groove from the end of the shaft, across the threads, cutting slightly deeper than the root diameter of the threads, then into the o-ring sealing area. Do this only on the BOTTOM of the shaft. If you check the physics of it all, that side is never loaded, so it won't cause any additional wear. Deburr the slotted area. That slot achieves two things. 1. It allows the grease to have a path so it can reach EVERY thread on the shaft. Without it, the grease you pump in with your grease gun only gets to the first couple of threads, leaving the rest to give a SQUUEEEEKKK every time you hit the speed bump pulling into the local cruise night. and 2: It gives the grease a pathway to leak (slightly) past the o-ring so it doesn't hydraulically blow out the o-ring when you set the car back on the ground as the threaded bushing turns on the shaft, decreasing the volume of the area where the incompressible grease resides. Nothing worse than watching your brand new o-ring come oozing out from inside the bushing when you lower the car. Before you let the car down, shoot the bushings full of grease, then remove all 4 zerk fittings. Let the car down slooowwwly and then bounce the front end up and down as much as you can. Now, reinstall the zerks and your bushings are properly greased with plenty of, but not too much, grease.

Or go to his section on suspension (scroll down):

http://www.mustangsteve.com/MustangSteveFAQ.html

Regards,
Chris
 

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took one look at my '68 UCA//LCA and thought what the hell - its only money. there was such deep rust that you would never detect a crack with visual inspection and a failure is catastrophic on these parts. got mine from Can. Mustang and i believe ones from Laurel Mt are same.
 
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