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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
Is it just me or do all of the replacement panels made in Taiwan fit like crap? I have been replacing the PS shock tower\Motor mount support and the inner fender apron on my 68 vert and they took alot of tweaking and some trimming along with reshaping to get these parts to line up. I am in the process of fitting the front fender apron\battery tray and it looks like the alignment of the panel is of by quite a bit. Anyone else experience this?
 

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Yes, when related to Mustangs "made in Taiwan" means total piece of crap.
 

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My front fender apron/battery tray is American Designer. Actually made in Canada and fit like a charm. My rear valance panel on the other hand as Previously posted Is my nightmare come true. I posted my thoughts at Hurtle's Reproduction Part Ratings .

If we all start to use it regularly and put the word out, maybe with a chinese translation, we will start getting better fitting parts...oh hell I'd settle for "almost close to half way decent" fitting parts.


Hey Chris...there goes that girl again :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am not sure if my front fender apron/battery tray is by American Design or not but it has little waves in the metal and the front seems to veer out a little away from where it sould weld to the radiator support.
 

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When I replaced the front passenger's side apron on my '67 I ordered a replacement panel from a vendor that was made in taiwan. I didn't ask, it came with the other parts that I ordered. The part looked good but seemed a little bit thinner. So I ordered another one from Matt at Ponderosa. He sent me an American Designer one. When I got it I quickly noticed it was a little, and I mean a little, thicker than the Made in Taiwan one, but it was all wrinkled on the curved portioned. When I put the two together and compared them, the made in taiwan looked the best so I used it. It looks great welded in.

BTW, I took a picture of both panels and sent them to Matt. He looked over the pictures and said that the American Designer ones that he had were all like that and he was going to connect his supplier to see what the problem was. So maybe it's been corrected, but the one panel that had to replace I ended up using the better of two pieces of crap!
 

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Consider: Your 68 vert is 36 years of age with maybe a time or two around the clock and countelss times around the block. :) Going through school, worked in a body shop putting late 50's and 60's cars together. Many of them needed shims, a yank or two with a pulldozer and other "chiropractic" manipulations to make them fit-with fact parts. Not here to defend Taiwan or American Designers.... Assembling an early Mustang is not always a walk in the park, but in the mainstream of same age cars, they are the easiest. Opinion. Taiwan stuff is not always good-not always bad. Have recently completed a complete rear assembly of a 66 cv with 2 new Tai 1/4's, wheelhouses, Ford tailite panel, used drain gutter, PO installed trunk floors and dropoffs. It went together pretty well! Not easy, lots of patience, swearing, every vise grip in the neighborhood, but it went together with good gaps, etc. If I had been working on comission, would have starved. :( On hourly rate, may have made .10 per hr! :: Am not sure that the factory Ford 1/4's would have been THAT much easier-save thicker guage metal.Front fenders from Tai. are another story. I don't use them. Tried once with a 68 and took it back. The repo doors--not sure. Stone guards, good, but thin (saved an orig Ford) Can't defend the shocktower 'cause have only done one used install on a 65.Was able to plugweld it from behind and also able to remove it from the doner car the way I wanted.
Have only used Am. Designer aprons. If there's major fitment probs, run some diagonal measures, look furthur back for any wrinkles or kinks. Have found that the use of an early GM bumper jack has been good for upper panel straighening and monte carlo bar install. It is possible that you may be out, or in, on one or both frame rails. If a car hasn't been wrecked, it is often best to just scab in the rusted portion on the RF apron saving the orig. Have only removed one totally. Have to agree about using Am Designers as the ticket for floorpans and structual stuff. Used Tai floor pans once-never again. Have read a lot of dissing on repo rear valances. Had to build up the edge of one end by 1/8" on the 1/4. Was having trouble making it fit. A guy in Ill. with a LOT more experience than I, told me to pull in the 1/4's more on the bottom behind the wheels before final welding to dropoffs. He was right. Have had reasonable luck wit 2 Tai hoods. They fit well. Have also used one 65/6 decklid and it was ok. The AM Designer cowl pieces are good-for 65/6, need work on 67/8. Back to the Shocktower-would imagine that it would need manipulation and some force to make connection for welding. Again, get some measurements, from another car, if poss. if yours has had damage.

Someday, hope to be able to put some pics on line. Am not too skillful with a puter.
 

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Ditto,

Even the factory parts dont fit from car to car.

It is all about how much patients you have.

I would agree though. The consistancy from panel to panel with the Tai parts is much less desireable than those of North American Production. It is as if the metal shifts in the press and distorts it. Real strange.
 
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