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I'm going to try and do my own replacing of my front seat upholstery and was hoping for some tips/tricks from those who have done it.

Got any good links to step-by-step instruction?

Any what not to do tips?

I ordered my new seat covers and hog rings and pliers.
 

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I helped a "pro" (OK, he was actually a Military seamstress that made a few jeep seat covers and repaired parachutes) install a set of covers about 30+ years ago on a car we did for my brothers girl friend at the time. I do remember it was a very difficult job stretching the cover over the foam. But since then I watched a shop do some and they used a steamer to warm things up and it looked much easier. I have heard that if you use too much steam, mildew can build up inside the seat, so be careful if you do rent one.
 

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Set them in the sun to get them nice and hot to loosen up the material or you'll be fighting them.
 

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I did mine last year as a 1st timer. i cant say that it was easy but if you have some mechanical ability youll be fine. work slow and do 1 seat at a time and use the other as a reference. you can cut and use coat hanger for the listings. i used my old foam which was in great shape.

a local shop wanted $600 labor with me bringing him the seats and meterails.

dont rush it. do 1 hog at a time flip the seat and pull the meterail straight then squeeze out another hog. and do the same

i didnt need a steamer. i just worked outside in the warm May sun and it went right on.


i rushed the last few hogs and had to re do them after it all was re installed then I noticed it was botched up.
all total it took me a full w/e to do the front and rear
 

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It is not that hard, I have done it three times. As mentioned before, it is easier if the material is warmed up first, either in the sun, or in the dryer for about 5 minutes will do. Although, the base of the seat you have to do the attaching of the hog rings along the inside "tucked in" portion of the material first, so the seat does not stay that warm in the time it takes to do the inside ring. Another trick once the tucked in portion is secure, is to use a plastic bag, like a kitchen bag or hefty bag over the foam, this will make the upholstry slide over the foam, and then you can either pull the plastic out, or just rip it high enough that it gets tucked in.
 

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From my experience on other makes it seems the biggest thing with recovering seats is taking your time, and paying attention to what you are doing. Unless you are adding padding to the seat, new padding is a must to have it look right, unfortunately stretching the cover over new padding can be a pain.
 

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+1 on setting the upholstery out in the sun and putting a plastic bag over the foam. Just wait for a nice warm day and sit outside and do it. I'm putting late model seats / covers in my pony so I don't have to worry about hog rings, but take your time with them because they are a pain to get off!

Also, make sure you have some extra foam on hand to pad up areas that aren't filled out completely when you put the covers on. Corners are especially prone to needing padding, I've found.
 

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Wow, Anybody ever see the late 1980's Stacy Keach TV show "Mike Hammer" Private investigator? Your car is the exact same blue color...lol.. In the series, They used 1965 and 1966 Hartops in the color that you have your car painted...

Tony K.
 

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PS: You can do it all yourself. Get a 1966 Mustang Interior assembly manual from NPD or Jim Osborn reproductions...and also take good notes when taking the seats apart. Just reverse for re-assembly..

Tony K.
 

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Definitely get the 45 degree gooseneck expensive hog ring pliers with the blue handles and the 45 degree ends. You will be thankful when ringing the listing wires!!!!
 

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Man I thought you were talking doing you own sewing. I did that a few years back to try to make some late model mustang seats look more at home in my coupe. They actually turned out pretty good. My kids thought I totally lost it.

You should be good installing the new covers. I have seen others put plastic like from a plastic bag over the foam to make the covers slide over better.. it does work.
 

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I used wire tie's to hold the seat cover tight and in place till I could get the hog ring's on.

Marty.
 

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I HIGHLY recommend getting new seat buns (foam) when doing this job, rather than the redneck-engineering of stuffing pieces of foam, newspaper, dead puppies, yadda yadda, inside to take up the slack. Your covers will fit much better, and I'm guessing that if your upholstery is needing replacement, your buns do, too. You won't believe how comfortable they become, and it's a pretty cheap addition to the project.
This is one of those jobs that I just hate, as I've said on here many times before. Personally, I'd rather pull an engine than do upholstering...but that's just me. When I did the interior of my '66 a couple of years ago, my wife surprised me by having my upholstery done as an anniversary present! Just FYI, our local shop only charged $200 ft./$200 rear with us providing the covers and buns. They did a bang-up job, and I didn't have to deal with the cussing and aching hands for days after. ;-)
Best of luck with yours - some really good advice here to heed!
 
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