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Discussion Starter #1
So, I'm fixing a bad patch job that the PO attempted on the bottoms of the doors on my '69 Mach 1. And while I was at it, i figured that I'd also replace the glued in glass with the '70 bolt in style along with some Dynamat for sound deadening. While putting the drivers door back on during mock up. I want to get the gaps properly aligned and all the body lines straight. I've come across a problem that I'm sure some of you other VMF'rs have come across. When I close the door, the "B" pillar gap is pretty decent and the bottom is straight across but it does stick out a little bit. (I'm still fine tuning it) but the back of the door is too far in when it shuts. I figured that if I could just loosen the door latch post and move it just a little bit outward I could get a nice smooth transition from the rear quarter panel to the door it would look and close a lot better, but NO....those screws wont budge!

The largest Phillips bits I have for my impact driver is a #3's. I already broke the tip off of one. Next, I tried using a little heat from a 1 lb propane bottle torch but it wasn't enough. I cant get any penetrating fluid behind it without yanking out the back seat and side panels from the interior. So for those in the know, How do you get the 50 year old "STUCK like CHUCK" door post screws out without wrecking the post or the "B" pillar? I'm willing to sacrifice the screws and also the latch post if I need to but I really don't want to. Any tricks that anybody has would be appreciated.
 

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I have experienced the same problem that you’re having. The thing I found to do the trick, as well as any, was a little tool called an “impact screwdriver” which can be had from Amazon, or Harbor freight, or nearly any tool outlet. The magic is… When you insert the screwdriver into the screw head,and smack it with a hammer, the impact is transferred into a twisting motion and will usually break loose a rusted or stubborn part.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have experienced the same problem that you’re having. The thing I found to do the trick, as well as any, was a little tool called an “impact screwdriver” which can be had from Amazon, or Harbor freight, or nearly any tool outlet. The magic is… When you insert the screwdriver into the screw head,and smack it with a hammer, the impact is transferred into a twisting motion and will usually break loose a rusted or stubborn part.
I did mention that i broke a # 3 bit while using my "impact driver" that is what I was using when the bit broke. What I should have said was "impact screwdriver" sorry, my bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Here is a link to a bunch of PH4 bits on amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=4+phillips+bits&gclid=Cj0KCQjwrrXtBRCKARIsAMbU6bGUKOfLg0y8SYHXDd7HBq-E2BWOn85LhhPJt4h3GH1-ro4gpwMKqzEaArKMEALw_wcB&hvadid=282906547168&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9027204&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=e&hvrand=3628174832956693417&hvtargid=aud-646675774026:kwd-301528726920&hydadcr=1611_9512018&tag=googhydr-20&ref=pd_sl_4ifogj8j4i_e


I'm not sure on that year but there is also the chance that it is actually a #4 Pozidrive. If it has little lines between the deep grooves of the + then it is most likely a Pozi and a PH4 will work but a Pozi is much better.
Thanks, getting a #4 was going to be my next step. I'm also looking for a #5 Phillips bit, but these screws are not very common therefore the tool is harder to find. I will look for Pozidrive bits with the lines
 
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