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When I bought this 65 A code earlier last year, my plan was to just get it ready for the road so I could enjoy it. Was going to work on it when I retire in a couple of years. New gas tank, rebuilt the carburetor. When I removed the steering box (Frame Rot @ steering box)
I saw the edge of the rabbit hole, frame rot @ steering box. Several YouTube searches and VMF lurking led me to take a welding course in preparation for a frame rail repair.... which led to adding inner floor support, frame rail extension, floor pans, then passenger frame rail and shock tower, some firewall and cowl repair and what I realized today while removing exhaust and transmission: rear frame rails are also needed. Yes, I have fallen, willingly down the rabbit hole!
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Ya, unfortunately yours is not an uncommon story. At least you took a welding class, many use the car for learning how to weld. :(
 

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65 Fastback 289 4 spd, 65 convertible 5.0L 5 spd. 3.73 8.8
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When I bought this 65 A code earlier last year, my plan was to just get it ready for the road so I could enjoy it. Was going to work on it when I retire in a couple of years. New gas tank, rebuilt the carburetor. When I removed the steering box (Frame Rot @ steering box)
I saw the edge of the rabbit hole, frame rot @ steering box. Several YouTube searches and VMF lurking led me to take a welding course in preparation for a frame rail repair.... which led to adding inner floor support, frame rail extension, floor pans, then passenger frame rail and shock tower, some firewall and cowl repair and what I realized today while removing exhaust and transmission: rear frame rails are also needed. Yes, I have fallen, willingly down the rabbit hole! View attachment 749538 View attachment 749539 View attachment 749540
Let us know when you land! LOL Good luck
 

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Most can relate, I was recently told by my sweet heart that I was good at dis-assembly....

Not sure if it was a compliment or a slam, I’ll fix her goat just in case it was the latter. :)
 
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Ya, unfortunately yours is not an uncommon story. At least you took a welding class, many use the car for learning how to weld. :(
How dare you Sir, I resemble that remark!
 

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Just remember how lucky you are working on a Vintage car. I just did a motor exchange on a 2002 volvo. It was bad enough of a knuckle buster job with a sideways motor with the trans on the right - and no, you can't pull just the motor, there is not enough clearance to get the flywheel out of the housing so I had to bolt them back together and remove the entire assembly. Then there's 10 miles of vacuum hoses and a dozen sensors but after all that - then I spent the next 6 weeks chasing codes to shut down the check engine light and pass inspection. UGH!!!
 

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I have to consider myself Blessed. My 66 had no frame/floor/body cancer at all. I really feel for you VMFers that get these unwelcome surprises.
 

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Yup, down the rabbit hole you go, been there, done that, and I'm addicted. I love working on my vintage Mustangs. When you have your car back on the road, you will be glad you did it the right way and didn't overlook the rust. Best of luck with your journey and please keep sharing with posts!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yup, down the rabbit hole you go, been there, done that, and I'm addicted. I love working on my vintage Mustangs. When you have your car back on the road, you will be glad you did it the right way and didn't overlook the rust. Best of luck with your journey and please keep sharing with posts!
Thanks image98!
 

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Ha! I did not know that, and certainly couldn't tell from your build.
Thanks! Actually I did a very little stick welding almost 40 years ago. I bought the MIG specifically for restoring the Mustang and after a few trial runs on farm equipment, watching some Youtube and research, started on areas out of site on the car, got good practice on those floor pan repairs. I spent some time figuring out setting and techniques that I wouldn't have if I had some classes.
I will TOTALLY agree with you that this is not the greatest method and not recommended for most people. I am very analytical though and don't rush things and definitely am not afraid to dive into things and learn as I go.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Ordered some sheet metal from NPD. Air chisel, cut off wheel, grinder are ready. Mig ready. Going to measure everything several times, write it all down. Slow and steady.. is the plan.
Also, ultimate goal is to make this a “GT clone”. Something like this:
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My 65 has zero, nada, zip rust or sheet metal issues, the PO did an outstanding job refreshing this car 10 years ago and its still perfect.

My 67 is the Hindenburg.
 
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Discussion Starter #17
Didn’t get much accomplished this week. Repositioned jack stands. Did some measuring. Went out to garage and just stared at the car. Squirrels running through my head. The order squirrel: which to remove first, frame rail, floor pan? The tool squirrel: Tried out the air chisel on some of the old rivet panel repairs, tested the spot weld cutter. Both performed excellent. Next is cutting out floor.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Drivers side, (Edit: entire rear frame rail, center trunk patches, wheelhouse patches on inner and outer) entire rear torque box and frame rail, added to the list.
 

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This thread is awesome! VERY glad to hear most VMF'ers use these projects as their first introduction to welding. Nice to know I'm not the only one.

OP, kudos to you for taking a class on welding. VERY cool. I did like most and did a lot of homework before I started my project. Looked at welders, different types of welding techniques and watched a lot of youtube videos. Spent about 6 months doing research and buying equipment to start my project. So far so good for me.

I love working on these cars. Yes, I have made some small mistakes, but once I get the job done and step back to take a look at the project I get such a feeling of satisfaction and accomplishment.

Keep on keeping on my fellow VMF'ers…………….
 
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