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I have a 65 fastback that has been in storage for about twenty years. It is a strip only car with sub frame connectors that are partialy inside the interior, 8 point roll cage, notched shock towers, and has a ladder bar rear end with a 9 inch carrier. The front fenders have been flared. The rear fenders have been flared and inner fenders partialy tubbed. The cowl vents and windshield wiper holes have been filled. This car could not be returned to the street without a lot of expense.

I also have a stock 65 C code fastback. Both cars are rust free and both need paint. I have all the parts necessary to turn either car into a track car.
Will the drag cars ladder bar rear axle have to be returned to the stock configuration for it to be used as a track car?
Any advise as to which car should be the track car? The other car will be sold.
Thanks,
Ron
 

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I'd turn the C code into the track car. I say this because the optimum traction when cornering would be achieved with an independent rear suspension and new front end suspension. I'd eliminate the shock towers and go with a custom fabricated tubular K member with the 95 mustang front suspension, albeit with coilovers. I'd go with Edelbrock, Tokiko (spelling?)or Koni adjustable shocks, in that order, possibly even QA-1 adjustables.Set it up with Baer or Wildwood 4-wheel disc brakes, using the lightweight multi-piston calipers and lightweight wheels to keep down the unsprung weight. I'd go with zinc-washed rotors to avoid rust in the cooling vents, and also gas checked (slotted) rotors, not drilled, as I've read of metal fatigue being promoted by the holes in cross drilled rotors. I'd duct air to the calipers/rotors to help avoid overheating the brakes. Subframe connectors, definately - the Total Control style which is not only front to rear, but also side to side.

I think you have a lot of additions on the drag car which are unnecessary for the suspension you need on the track car. You don't need the weight transfer from front to rear to plant traction on the rear tires at launch. Ladder bars unnecessary on the track car.

Just my 2 cents worth. On the other hand, it would probably be easier to sell the C code and you would get more money for it than the strip car.
 

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A drag car is a track car trying to go straight.

I'd use the old drag car has the basis of a track car. The flares and tub's will let you run wider rubber
than in stock configuration (which is real good on a track car). The cage and subframes are a plus
for a tigther chassis. Drop the laddeers and re-install some leafs.

Fyi, my car is street legal with a cage and subframes, can't be that much work to make the old drag car
streetable.

Bob.
 

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If your drag car is anything like my race car, I'd sell the C-coder and modify it into a track car. The basic frame is there and it would just be a matter of changing suspensions to a track-specific one.

I would never, ever cut up a fastback again. When I did mine they were a dime a dozen; now, one is lucky to find one that isn't thrashed or rusted or already restored and fetching huge dollars.
 

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Ron,

You could go either way with the Fastback, what do you want to do? There are guys that love drag racing and guys that love going around corners... You do end up with more track time when you go open tracking VS drag. With the amount of tracks we have access to in the bay area and the amount of clubs, you can be on a road course almost every weekend... See Norcal Sheby Club , NASA, greenflag racing, for details..
 

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Track car suspension can be as special and hardcore as drag car. If you really want that, definitely sell the c-coder and ladder bar parts and use the drag race car.

You can go IRS route, but I don't think that a properly set live axle is any worse. Coil-overs, Watts link and torque arm set up will go long way. Unless you are in a hurry, you should log in to corner carvers' forum and read what there is about early Mustang suspension.
 
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