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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks to a high-rider pickup truck in a parking lot many years ago, my poor coupe picked up a couple of nasty dents in the passenger side driprail. I want to pull the molding and attempt to knock the dents out. Chuck has the small anvil that is used to do this, but not the hammer. I know Eastwood sells them, but are they available elsewhere, like at Sears or Harbor Freight? Time is running short and I don't really want to have to wait on mail order, if I can find it somewhere else.

Of course, then I have to get brave enough to remove the driprail, which has never been off the car. ::
 

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Are you going to Dearborn? Anyway, I'd check any of the body/paint supply shops. I put the repop drip rails on the 65 and I had all kinds of problems putting them back on, so I'd be careful. If you are up against a deadline, I'd take the point deduction and let it be. This is a project best left to the off season so you can be extremely careful and take your time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm getting ready for the Grand National, not Dearborn, so I have about three weeks yet. I don't mind the one point deduction, but I hate the way the driprail looks, it really detracts from the car's appearance. Just ask Midlife. I have a set of repros, but I don't want to use them (knowing the problems). So, that means my only choice is to fix the originals. I'll check the auto paint shop where a lot of my money seems to go. ;)
 

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Laurie, a hammer isn't necessary. You can get by with a ball peen and a small punch(steel, brass, plastic). Once you've removed the dents by creating slight high spots on the outside of the moulding, use a flat file in a length wise motion to even the surface. Slow and methodical is the way to go. Then hand sand with wet/dry paper 280-400-600 grit using WD-40 as a lubricant. After 600 grit the trim will need to be buffed with compound & wheel.
The resulting repair will be perfect and only you'll know it was once dented. I repair stainless trim all the time for people and can tell you if you miss any one of these steps, the repair will be noticable. Just pounding out the dent will look worse than leaving it alone. :)
 

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As long as you will be putting back the original molding, you will have no problem getting them back on.

I was daunted by that task as well, so I took a repro set and the originals to my body shop. He tried to get the repro's on.... Wouldn't fit anywhere near nice enough and he's had plenty experiency with them. He took them of and put on the originals. Took less then 4 minutes for both sides and they looked right. Only had to buff them a bit to get them to shine like new.

I would'nt use the repro's if I were you, especially not on your original coupe!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks! If we decide to attempt it, that's what we'll do. I guess we'll make the decision this weekend.
 

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if Harbor Freight doesn't have them JC Whitney does - been looking at them since most like Eastwood,s are way expensive for a 1 job use but would be worth it for a lifetime tool. quick look shows JC Whitney has 7 piece kit with 3 hammers and 4 dollies for $16. PN 89UF0023W.
 
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