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Discussion Starter #1
hi
sorry but this relates to my truck if someone can answer for me. i was told by two people that for any manual car when at a stop light to put it in neutral or it could wear down i think he said the throwout bearings, is this true? my dad drives manual and didnt know that, but hes not a car guy. is there anyother things i should be careful of while driving my truck that might me wearing it down? btw i drive a 1994 toyota 4 banger pickup.
thanks
 

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Whenever you have the clutch depressed, you're putting a load on the throwout bearing, which is a big-a** lazy-susan bearing that presses on the clutch fingers.

If you're stopped for more than a few seconds, putting the tranny in neutral and letting the clutch out will save wear and tear on the throwout bearing.

While we're on this page, using the clutch to hold the car on a hill will wear out a clutch in much less time than many, many miles of normal driving. The clutch only wears for a moment when it grabs a new gear, and a little more when you're slipping it off the line. Sitting and holding it in a slip is like driving around with one foot on your brake all the time... the clutch (brake) lining will just get ground away to no particularly good end.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
so when say going around a curve, can you depress the clutch until you get to the point where you can actually put it into a lower gear to complete the turn. is that the correct way to do it? such as: say im in 3rd and the light is green to make a right turn, about 100-200ft before the turn what i normally do is depress the clutch put the stick into 2nd and make the turn. at the point where i am going slow enough to be in second i put it into gear. is this correct?
thanks for imput with last message
 

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Well, from a clutch component wear viewpoint, you want to shift as infrequently and as quickly as possible. That doesn't always match what the real world needs, but it's something to keep in mind.

Your second question is more about proper stickshift driving style. In general, you never shift in a curve. Judge your speed and the curve in advance and put the car in a gear that will get you through it. (For the controlled conditions of track racing, you generally downshift just before a curve then accelerate as hard as you can through and out of it. Again, this isn't always possible in the real world, but you should avoid shifting in a curve whenever you can.)
 

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Nitropress is right on. I will add, though, that in all the Toyota manual transmission cars I've had, I've never worn out a throw out bearing. Now I would always replace the throw out bearing when replacing a clutch, just for good measure, but I've never had one go out. I say this because I don't want you thinking that the throw out bearing is some fragile piece that must be babied. I drive my cars hard, and all the Toyota sticks I've had were no different.
 

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...in all the Toyota manual transmission cars I've had, I've never worn out a throw out bearing.
That's because Toyotas have clutch plates made out of jack cheese that wear out long before a bearing can go. :)
 

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<In general, you never shift in a curve>
WHAT?
I have never heard such a thing in all my years of driving.
You shift when its needed. You listen to the engine,when the engine speed requires it, you shift......!
Thats the real world,the engine speed dictates when you shift.
Be that up or down.
Proper technique is not that hard to learn. Listen to the engine, feel the car in your finger tips,your feet,the seat of your pants. listen and feel the music, that mechanical song.
They all sing it you just have to learn to hear it and then hum along.
You shift when its required by the load of the engine you do not lug it nor do you let it rev unnecessarily,when the load is off,up shift. if it begins to labor down shift. it is that simple
Oh my last daily driver had 286,000 miles on it with the factory clutch.
 

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I have to come to Nitropress's defence here. He did specify that " In general, you never shift in a curve". In general, you wouldn't ... you'd down shift going in, then upshift as you come out and RPM's dictate it. Sure, there will be times that things don't work as planned, but in general ...
 

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I have never heard such a thing in all my years of driving.
It's a basic rule of performance driving: brake and downshift into a curve, accelerate and upshift out of it. In general, there are already enough things going on in the negotiation of a curve not to add the stress of shifting - it's a distraction to the driver and can upset the car's attitude when you're near the limits of adhesion.

As I said, that's a general rule and a good one to follow... but daily, real-world driving has other demands. It's still a better idea to be watching the road and put the car into whatever gear will get you through the curve or bends before you get there, but the evidence is that lots of people row their cars like boats and are perfectly happy doing so.
 

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having my grandpa, who was a car hauler for hadley and ryder for over 40 years and being the best driver that i know, always told me that u always take it out of gear at a stop light, to save the throw out bearings, although newer ones last much longer than the old ones did. Also you downshift going into the turn let the clutch out before you hit the turn and accelerate in and threw the turn like someone said previously. BTW ive never heard of not shifting through a turn either. I say feel for the shift, or if you have a tach, between 3-4 grand for normal driving conditions.
 

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A race course and the street are vastly different worlds.
And he was asking about the basics of manual transmision driving,not the limits of adhesion.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks everyone i appreciate it
 

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Besides what nitro says, the main thrust bearing in the engine will see excess wear on the thrust surfaces. If you've ever looked at the thrust side of a main bearing out of a stick car, you'll see that it has wear.

Years ago, I use to be in VW's. VW recommended shifting into nuetral when stopped because the throw out bearings weren't that hearty and would wear.
 

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You've started an interesting discussion here. I'd like to toss in a cent or two.
I leave my clutch depressed at lights unless they extraordinarily long and my leg gets tired. I could care less about the throwout bearing. Newer ones seem to outlast two clutches. They're cheap and generally give you ample warning by way of squealing before they fail. Stuff happens, sure. But I've yet to have a throwout bearing fail before the clutch needed service and the bearing got changed anyway.
Not shifting during curves is an excellent guideline for everybody. "Guideline", not a rule, as every situation is different as is every curve. Perhaps this is more important to race drivers, motorcyclists, and folks who take curves at slightly more than the recommended speed (also known as fun, to me anyway).
Race drivers are taught that before entering a curve they want to be done braking and have the car in the gear they want to use when exiting the curve. During the curve they should be doing nothing but steering the vehicle.
It works. Though racers are concerned with maintaining maximum speed thought the curves, the same techniques apply to daily drivers too. I would think that anyone who has taken ANY kind of driving or driving safety course should have heard of this. Safely negotiating curves is every driver's concern.
I believe none of this applies to my mother. Who drives 10mph under the posted limit in any case. If you drive that slowly you can probably do whatever you please in the middle of a curve with little effect.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
wahoo! yeah i think ive passed your mom while driving, lol ::
 

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Trust me, EVERYBODY passes my Mom. ::
 
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