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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Can i use this Master Cylinder with my manual 4 wheel drum setup? Is there a difference between a drum Master Cylinder and a disc Master Cylinder? I have a 1967.
Wilwood Brake Master Cylinder Tandem With Push Rod And 15/16" Bore 1965-1973
Thanks,
Paul
Edit: For those wondering why i would go with the wilwood Master Cylinder: Im planning to upgrade to Wilwood disc brakes and want it to match.
But i guess i will buy a cheaper one as a temporary solution until i upgrade to discs.
 

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I am sure others will chime in with specifics but I am pretty sure there are differences since the 1967 disc set up was for power brakes.

Even if there isn’t a difference, I am wondering what is drawing you toward the Wilwood when something stock might serve you just as well with less headaches for a fraction of the cost?
 

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Drum brakes require a residual valve to keep a little pressure in the wheel cylinder. Some OE master cylinders have the residual valves built into the master cylinder and some don't. Some Mustangs have residual valves plumbed into a brake line somewhere on the car. There are variations depending on the car and year. You probably can use that master cylinder with the original manual drum brakes. But you need to account for and possibly install residual valves. The most common use for that type of master cylinder is for 2 or 4 wheel disk brakes so it won't have residual valves. Also, some new brake lines may be required if the ports are in a different location. It is a nice looking master cylinder. But a stock replacement will work for a fraction of the price.
 

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When you called CJ, did they state it had residuals in both ports for Drum/Drum, If they did, yes it will be excellent.
 

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Considering it has fluid outlet ports on both sides I doubt it has residual valves in the ports.
I think the OP needs to call CJ, pose the question of the aspect of residuals in both ports for Drum/Drum.
Hope OP can also, somehow, relate the gigantic "daaaa" received.
 

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Yeah. I seriously doubt that any of their master cylinders have residual valves in the ports.
They do sell 2# and 10# units. I have a 10# on my '68, which has rear drum.

ex-Global West GM
1991-1995
 

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The disc-drum cylinders are different in three aspects. The drum has a rod that goes to the brake pedal. The disc lacks. it. The fitting ports are of different sizes on the disc master and the bore is 1" Vs. 15/16. They don't interchange.
The residual valve is used on all disc systems 67-70. The 67 has the residual valve at the rear floor pan just to the left of the bracket the hose from the differential housing. The 68-70 cars have the residual valve at the distribution block.
As another noted: It's not a proportioning valve. It simply holds 3PSI of pressure in the line to the rear drums.
 

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I went with Chock's kit for my 66FB. Easy install and if I ever need parts I can go to NAPA or Rock Auto for parts and not pay Wilwood a forture for theirs. You can even stencil CHOCK on the caliper if you want to show a name....:cool:
 

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And I'm not even going to try and fix the misinformation in the posts.
I wanted to say the same thing.

ex-Global West GM
1991-1995
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I went with Chock's kit for my 66FB. Easy install and if I ever need parts I can go to NAPA or Rock Auto for parts and not pay Wilwood a forture for theirs. You can even stencil CHOCK on the caliper if you want to show a name....:cool:

I was going to paint over the big white wilwood logo on the top! I don't buy stuff because of the brand! Just heard a lot of positive things about their products.
By the way, how much is the Chock kit?
 

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Assuming you already have drums, shoes, etc and all you need is the master cylinder, you could just buy the one woodchuck linked.
 

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I was going to paint over the big white wilwood logo on the top! I don't buy stuff because of the brand! Just heard a lot of positive things about their products.
By the way, how much is the Chock kit?
Don’t remember the cost, was a few years ago. Just PM CHOCK for a quote. Also, I hope you realize my comment about stenciling Chocks name on the caliper was all in fun.
 

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I agree with Dan AKA Chock. The information I provided is fact. Not conjecture. As for the disc/drum. It makes no sense to spend the money on a Wilwood cylinder for a Drum/Drum factory set-up.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I agree with Dan AKA Chock. The information I provided is fact. Not conjecture. As for the disc/drum. It makes no sense to spend the money on a Wilwood cylinder for a Drum/Drum factory set-up.
I should probably clarify: My current master cylinder leaks and i want upgrade to front discs soon. Now my question: Can i use this master cylinder with my drums until i swap over to discs in a few months? I don't plan to keep it with drums. I know that doesn't make sense.
But i think i will just buy a cheap 4 wheel drum cylinder for 30$ as a temporary solution until i convert to discs.
 

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I agree with Dan AKA Chock. The information I provided is fact. Not conjecture. As for the disc/drum. It makes no sense to spend the money on a Wilwood cylinder for a Drum/Drum factory set-up.
Well sir I have to try to help a bit.
Stock wise 67-73 a you stated master cylinders with Drum/Drum had push rods, Disc did not. 64-66 Mustang Disc brake cars had a push rod. Those using a 74 Maverick Front Disc/Rear drum master will have a push rod.
Residual valves are in the master on the original Drum/Drum cars, Front Disc rear drum masters had residual in front port for rear drum brakes, Zero in rear port for the front disc brakes.
A inline residual (2#-or 10# ) can be added inline if you were to use a master with no internal residuals.
Stock wise no residuals were above the rear end, or by the distribution block as you stated.
You were think about the proportioning valve which is as you stated, above the rear end on 67, beside the brake distribution block on 68 69, 70 had a integral proportioning valve inside the block.
Residuals keep the brake line "Charged" with pressure.
Proportioning valve restrict sudden/extreme high pressure flow.
Hope this helps.
 
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