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Discussion Starter #1
Hello! New here, bought my first Stang today. 1967 Coupe w/ 351 and 4 speed manual. Drove it from PDX to SEA with zero issues. The biggest thing for me to overcome was the braking, a Boeing 747 can stop in less distance.
Has anyone done a brake conversion? Either just the front or all four?
 

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68 Mustang Coupe
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Hello! New here, bought my first Stang today. 1967 Coupe w/ 351 and 4 speed manual. Drove it from PDX to SEA with zero issues. The biggest thing for me to overcome was the braking, a Boeing 747 can stop in less distance.
Has anyone done a brake conversion? Either just the front or all four?
As in drums to discs? Or adding power to your existing brakes?

Just to let you know, there is no advantage in stopping distance to swapping to discs or even power discs. Adding disc brakes does have other advantages. Adding power brakes just makes the pedal easier to push. If i were you I'd put the car up on jack stands and take stock of what you have. Verify that the brakes you have are in good working order and are adjusted properly. That'll go a long way in whoaing your pony
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks for the input. And yeah, meant drums to disc. I’m putting it up tonight to see, could just be crap brakes.
 

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If it doesn't stop like a Piper Cub in a 50kt headwind then something is amiss with your brake system. The most common causes are a) crappy friction material(s), b) glazed drums &/or linings, c) improperly arched linings (radius of lining doesn't match drum), d) stuck/frozen wheel cylinder pucks.
 

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If it doesn't stop like a Piper Cub in a 50kt headwind then something is amiss with your brake system. The most common causes are a) crappy friction material(s), b) glazed drums &/or linings, c) improperly arched linings (radius of lining doesn't match drum), d) stuck/frozen wheel cylinder pucks.
Love the cub reference. Grew up flying in one, my step dad owned one for almost 40 years.
 
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Call Chocko
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If it doesn't stop like a Piper Cub in a 50kt headwind then something is amiss with your brake system. The most common causes are a) crappy friction material(s), b) glazed drums &/or linings, c) improperly arched linings (radius of lining doesn't match drum), d) stuck/frozen wheel cylinder pucks.
Okay! Drums are actually in decent shape. The brake pedal sinks, too, so I’m guessing it’s a master cylinder issue. Going to replace that and the lines and see if that does the trick.

Thanks for the input! Very helpful.
 

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Sounds like master cylinder to me. I was having the same issue a number of years ago. Had my local mechanic check it out. He replaced the MC and everything has stopped just fine ever since. Muddy pedal and taking way too long to stop were the symptoms.
... and it's a lot cheaper than replacing the whole braking system. I have 4 drums, manual. It stops when I put my feet on the pedals.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
yeah, you’re right. Much cheaper than the conversion. I’m surprised that I was able to make it safely across 200 miles with them being this bad.
 

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Not discouraging you from converting to disc as I’ll do it in a year or two. But I’ve got a very happy 4 drum manual setup. If done right, with quality parts they can work great. I’ve been able to hang behind 4 wheel disc classic Mustangs and modern era stang’s on twisties through mountains and punished them downslope with no fade. In think a good suspension it key too. All my brake parts came from rock auto and were inexpensive.
 

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Okay! Drums are actually in decent shape. The brake pedal sinks, too, so I’m guessing it’s a master cylinder issue. Going to replace that and the lines and see if that does the trick.

Thanks for the input! Very helpful.
Good place to start. The discs have no inherent advantage over the drums in a single panic stop, they have the same swept area. Discs cool more quickly, so in hard use, like on an autocross course or mountain road, they recover more quickly.
 

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We had no idea of this thing called Disc Brakes in the 60's. All we were aware of was the old farm trucks, cars, etc had brakes. Yes they were drum brakes. I'm living to exclaim, drum brakes will stop a tandem truck with 800 bushel of corn going down a hill, a 66 Mustang stopping at 75 MPH efficiently.
Now, the braking system has to be in good working order. A Mustang poorly maintained, Improperly installed (A big one today) or setting for years will have piss poor brakes.
Does installing Disc Brakes mean your ability to stop will increase? More than likely if you have the mentioned aspect stated. IF you have excellent working drum brakes, the advantage is very minimal.
Then the rear Disc Brakes on our classics---Why in the world would anyone spend $600.00 to gain less than 5% in braking ability on rear disc brakes. Boggles my mind.
 

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Cuz we gots to look cool Chock.

My brother's 1969 428 SCJ drag pack with 4 wheel manual brakes stops AT LEAST as well as my 69 351w 4 wheel manual disc with 14.2" front Brembos. And mine stops pretty dang well.
 

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A surprising number of 67-70 big-block Mustangs were ordered with disc brake delete due to the popularity of drag racing, and because some people disliked the discs.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
OKAY! New master cylinder, bled the lines, and this sucker is golden. Thanks for the advice. Now, on to the next.
 
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